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The Impact of Psoriasis on Personal Relationships Survey Fact Sheet

This survey was created in partnership with the National Psoriasis Foundation and Galderma Laboratories, L.P.

Within this issue, as well as our November and December 2010 issues, we will be printing important findings revealed from the recent survey, "The Impact of Psoriasis on Personal Relationships." This survey, sponsored by Galderma Laboratories, was distributed to the National Psoriasis Foundation membership database via Survey Monkey. The survey was completed by approx 1,520 people; statistics below represent the percentage of people who answered a specific question (not always all 1,520 respondents). Statistics are rounded to nearest percentage point and percentages may not add up to 100 percent depending on the structure of the question. Not every respondent answered every question.i Below is a list of findings relating to psoriasis and its impact of social relationships.

Nearly 80 percent (78.7%) of question respondents feel that psoriasis has had a negative impact on their personal relationships.ii

Social Relationships

  • When having a psoriasis flare-up, 63.3 percent of respondents are less likely to go out socially iii and 53.6 percent have declined social invitations or cancelled plans because of a flare-up.iv Nearly 70 percent (69.6%) feel that psoriasis has impacted their social relationships.v
  • When meeting someone new, 74.3 percent of question respondents worry that the person will notice their psoriasis,vi and 72.1 percent of respondents are concerned that people that notice will think of them less favorably.vii
  • When going out for social occasions, 79.5 percent of respondents usually only wear outfits that cover up
    their psoriasis.viii
Published in Scope This


Pomegranate the Ancient Red Goddess!

by Natalie Pergar

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Known not only as part of the elite group of super fruits, the all mighty pomegranate, English word comes from the Latin words for apple; "pomum" (apple) and "granatus" (seeded), has been dated as far back as 1,000 BC and was introduced to North America by Spanish settlers in 1769. This red beauty represents global symbolism and history ranging from righteousness, prosperity, and fertility.

With over 760 varieties of pomegranate it is one of the oldest known medicines to man. Ancient Greek healers would use pomegranate juice to manage health problems similar to arthritis, circulation problems, digestive disorders, and infections. And to add to the wonders of the pomegranate, the fruit was also involved in ancient beauty concoctions. Today with our growing beauty culture and desire to turn back the clock, we find ourselves revisiting what our ancient friends already knew with the help of modern science and research.

Pomegranates are packed with phytonutrients, vitamin B, and an abundance of vitamin C. They contain red arils, tiny edible seeds that are loaded with juice and provide valuable fiber. They are delicious and fantastic to eat - though I would not recommend eating the white membrane that surrounds the arils as it is quite bitter and the consensus is that it is not recommended. And for those of us that count calories, a 1/2 cup of raw pomegranate has 80 calories and 0 grams of fat!

According to the American Association for Cancer Research (AACR), pomegranate fruit extract contains several polyphenols and anthocyanidins (pigment that gives certain fruits their dark red colors). Its antioxidant activity is higher than that of red wine and green tea and research suggests that pomegranate extract may have significant clinical benefits in decreasing risk for skin cancer.

By taking pomegranate extract capsules, one could reduce or reverse the signs of aging by promoting cell turnover and creating new, healthy skin. But that is not all! Evidence shows that including it in your skin care regime can provide wonderful results too. Rich in ellagic acid to manage free radicals, pomegranate oil contains punicic acid, an omega 5 conjugated fatty acid effective in aiding cell regeneration and proliferation. Pomegranate also carries beneficial phytoestrogen and a rare plant-based source of conjugated linoleic acids (CLA), an anti-carcinogen.

So I salute you, oh red goddess of history. Bring me health and wellness with all your super fruit power!

Pomegranate, Almond Oil, and Honey Mask


½ pomegranate
2 tsp almond oil
½ tbsp organic honey

Warm up the honey until it becomes liquid (not too hot!) by putting it in a small glass or metal bowl which is immersed in hot water. Peel the pomegranate half, cut the fruit in pieces, and put these in a bowl or food processor. Add the honey and almond oil. Blend it all into a smooth and uniform paste. Spread this gently and equally with your fingertips on your clean face and neck: keep the eye area clear. Now lie down, relax, and leave the mask on for 20 minutes. Then, wash it off with lukewarm water and end with a splash of cold water; pat your skin dry with a clean towel. Finally, apply a moisturizer, this way you "seal" your skin to keep the water inside. (For all skin types). *This fruit mask recipe peels your skin and we do not recommend using it on acne skin.

Copyright ® 2009-2010 Natural – Homeremedies-For-Life

Pomegranate Oat Bran Scrub

2 ounces pomegranate juice
2 ounces orange juice
2 tbsp honey
2 tbsp sea salt
3 to 4 ounces oat bran

1. In a container large enough to hold two cups, combine pomegranate and orange juices. To this add the honey and mix together well.
2. Now add sea salt and oat bran. Mix together and allow the oat bran to soak up the liquids, about 10 to 20 minutes.
3. Make sure to apply to a clean face. Probably the easiest way is to apply in the shower after you clean your face and allow it to set while you do other things. The steam from the shower helps allow the ingredients to penetrate your skin. Then, gently scrub off as you shower.

Copyright ® eHow.com

Published in Scope This


Pomegranates May Fight Breast Cancer

by Jennifer Warner, reviewed by Louise Chang, M.D.

Eating pomegranates or drinking pomegranate juice may help prevent and slow the growth of some types of breast cancer. A new study shows a group of phytochemicals called ellagitannins found in abundance in pomegranates inhibited the growth of estrogen-responsive breast cancer in laboratory tests.

"Phytochemicals suppress estrogen production that prevents the proliferation of breast cancer cells and the growth of estrogen-responsive tumors," researcher Shiuan Chen, Ph.D., director of the Division of Tumor Cell Biology and co-leader of the Breast Cancer Research Program at City of Hope in Duarte, Calif., says in a news release.

Researchers say the ellagitannins in pomegranates work by inhibiting aromatase, which is a key enzyme used by the body to make estrogen and plays a key role in breast cancer growth.

"We were surprised by our findings," Chen says. "We previously found other fruits, such as grapes, to be capable of the inhibition of aromatase. But the phytochemicals in pomegranates and in grapes are different."

Researchers say pomegranates have recently been hailed for their potential anti-cancer and heart healthy benefits thanks to their high antioxidant content. But they say this is the first study to look at their effects on aromatase and breast cancer growth.

In the study, published in Cancer Prevention Research, researchers examined the impact of 10 ellagitannin-derived compounds from pomegranates on aromatase activity and breast cancer cell growth in laboratory tests.

The results showed that of those 10 compounds, urolithin B most significantly inhibited breast cancer cell growth. Experts say further studies will be needed to determine whether eating or drinking pomegranate-derived products will have the same effect in humans, but these results are promising.

Until then, researchers say people may consider eating more pomegranates to protect against cancer in the breast and perhaps other tissues and organs.

Copyright© WebMD Health News

Published in Scope This


Step 3: How to Treat Dandruff?

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Two factors should be considered when you treat dandruff: Your age and the severity of your dandruff. Your aim will be to stop the dandruff by slowing down the reproduction of skin cells, and/or counteract the yeast production that might be the cause.

Shampoos and Scalp Preparations

Shampoos and products for the scalp are available over-the-counter (OTC) at most supermarkets, pharmacies, and many corner shops. It is important to remember that seborrheic dermatitis can be controlled, but not cured with these products.

Before using an anti-fungal shampoo see if you can remove any scaly or crusty patches on your scalp - do this with care. If you manage to remove them the shampoo will be
more effective.

If you have dandruff on your beard you can use dandruff shampoo on it. Most anti-dandruff or anti-fungal shampoos contain at least one of the following active ingredients:

  • Zinc pyrithione - an ingredient which slows down the production of yeast.
  • Selenium sulphide - this reduces the production of natural oils your scalp glands produce.
  • Coal tar - this has a natural anti-fungal agent. If your hair is dyed or treated remember that long-term coal tar usage can stain the hair.
  • Ketoconazole - a very effective anti-fungal. Most people who use this are pleased with the results. Experts say shampoos with this ingredient can be used with young and elderly people.
  • Salicylic acids - these help your scalp get rid of skin cells. It does not slow down the reproduction of skin cells. Many "scalp scrubs" contain salicylic acids. Some people find salicylic acid treatments leave their scalps dry and eventually make the flaking of the skin worse.
  • Tea-tree oil - this oil comes from the Australian Tea Tree (Melaleuca alternifolia). A growing number of shampoos now include tea-tree oil as an ingredient. It has been used for centuries as an anti-fungal, antibiotic, and an antiseptic. However, some people are allergic to it.
  • Green tea potential - researchers from the Medical College of Georgia, U.S. found that green tea may have potential for the treatment of dandruff and psoriasis.

Ideally, select a shampoo that has one of the above ingredients and shampoo your hair with it every day until your dandruff is under control. When that happens use them less frequently. You may find a particular shampoo stops being so effective after while, if this occurs switch to one that has another ingredient.

Make sure the shampoo has time to stay on your scalp before you rinse it off - perhaps about five minutes. If you rinse it off too quickly the ingredient will not have enough time to work. If after several weeks of treating yourself you still have dandruff, you should consider seeing your doctor or a dermatologist (skin specialist).

Published in Scope This

Menopause

by Rebecca Hulem

Menopause is a normal, natural stage of life that affects everyone differently. In the U.S., an estimated two million women enter menopause annually. Over the past five years, I have used my own menopause experiences to educate women and clinicians about the choices available for symptom treatment.

What are Typical and Atypical Symptoms?
Typical symptoms include: hot flashes, night sweats, mood swings, irritability, sleep disturbances, confusion, decreased libido, and vaginal dryness. Atypical symptoms include heart palpitations and anxiety, but are usually not reported by most women. Two options for minimizing and managing these symptoms include hormone therapy and natural relief.

What are the Pros and Cons of Hormone Replacement Therapy (HRT)?
Since the release of the findings from the Women's Health Initiative study in 2002 the practice of prescribing hormones to women going through menopause has changed significantly. Prior to the study, it was widely believed in the medical community that prescribing hormones to women experiencing menopause symptoms would not only relieve these symptoms but also protect women against heart disease and osteoporosis. The new recommendations are:

  • Prescribe hormone therapy early in the menopause transition. Prescribing these hormones five to 10 years past the menopause transition can increase risk of blood clots, heart attack, and strokes. Women should also be prescribed hormone therapy for five years or less
  • No hormone regimen should be prescribed to treat or prevent heart disease
  • HRT treatment should primarily be used for vasomotor symptoms like hot flashes and night sweats, and/or treating and preventing
    vaginal atrophy

How Do You Achieve Natural Symptom Relief?

  • Incorporating a healthy diet like an abundance of fresh vegetables, fruits, and plant-based proteins is a good first step for relieving menopause symptoms. Avoid caffeine, alcohol, and spicy foods to avoid triggering hot flashes. Also try to exercise daily and practice stress reducing practices like meditation, yoga, and tai chi.
  • Take all-natural supplements. Look for a product line that contains natural mood and memory herbal blends to support mental clarity, restore energy, improve cognitive function, and build a strong immune system.


For more information on this topic, visit www.themenopauseexpert.com.

Published in Scope This


Dealing with Teenage Acne

Cranberr facial mask

by Jaskiran Brar


The teenage years are wondrous days filled with new discoveries, fun, and friends. For a number of kids, these years are also filled with acne. In addition to causing painful whiteheads, blackheads, and red lumps, acne can leave scars and affect self-esteem during those critical adolescent years.

According to the American Academy of Dermatology, between 85 – 95 percent of American teenagers develop acne, and many of them will continue to battle the condition into their 20s and 30s.

A number of factors such as diet, personal hygiene, genetics, and hormones seem to play into the incidence of teenage acne. During puberty, hormone levels surge, often causing a hardening of the oil in the pores of the skin, preventing sebum from naturally making its way to the surface.

While almost all teenagers experience a few zits, the severity of the problem depends on hereditary factors. Over time, untreated acne can even leave permanent scarring, not to mention the emotional distress the teenager has to endure.

Along with good nutrition and healthy lifestyle, regular skin treatments during adolescence can make a world of difference in a teenager's complexion. Parents need to address the condition early, and make sure their teens follow proper skin care routines at home. A diligently followed routine, along with regular acne facials, for many of these teenagers can mean the difference between smooth glowing skin and permanent scarring.
Published in Scope This

Digging into the Newest Plant Cell Breakthroughs

Science seems like a very artificial and synthetic thing, where compounds are manipulated in sterile spaces by people wearing white coats and latex gloves. But incredibly, the latest breakthrough in beautiful skin comes from the earth and sea itself, and from some of the garden's most deliriously sensual flowers.
Botanicals have been used in cosmetics for centuries. But today, utilizing plant stem cell technology, we are able to extract cells from plants and cultivate them in the laboratory, multiplying their potency by literally 1,000 times or more than that which is present in the naturally occurring molecule.

Published in Ingredients

Salt is a mineral that is composed primarily of sodium chloride. There are two main forms of salt: unrefined (sea salt) and refined (table salt); of the two, unrefined salt provides the highest benefits when used for aesthetic purposes.
Bath salts are a great way to relieve many different kinds of health concerns, such as acne, arthritis, psoriasis, insect bites, female problems, tendonitis, water retention, stress relief, etcetera. Hippocrates, the Father of Medicine, noticed the benefits from 'salt' water after he noticed that fisherman were able to heal their hands by soaking them in seawater.

Published in Treatments

Summer makeup has always been about minimal looks, bronzed glowing skin and keeping it easy. When fall rolls around, the looks start to get more ornate and dramatic, which can be intimidating to many women. I know from my days of working retail that many of my customers were creatures of habit and liked wearing the same lipstick, blush or eyeshadow. When their favorite shade was discontinued, they would look high and low for the same color. I used to explain that this was a sign to try something new.

Published in Makeup Matters

Aromatherapy is the art and science of using pure essential oils extracted from natural botanicals to relax, balance, and rejuvenate the body, mind, and spirit. The use of aromatherapy goes back to ancient China, which is believed to be the first society to have treated the body and mind with aromatic plant oils. Eventually, the practice spread to the Egyptians, Greeks, and Romans; and it regained its popularity in the late 20th century and continues to grow in approval through the 21st century.

Published in Treatments