Antonia Schreiber

Antonia Schreiber

Special Delivery: Mediums & Modalities of Cannabinoids

Skin care and growing cannabis are actually very similar practices for me. While this is my 20th year in the treatment room, it is only my third year in the cannabis industry, and I’ve come to learn that it is measured in dog years – for every single year of changes and advances in the industry it feels like three or more has passed. The common ground is simply that, like people, plants are organisms whose existence, health, and equilibrium rely on basic needs: air, water, sun, and sustenance. 

Just like plants, we operate as organisms in optimum pH. Internally, our bodies need to be slightly alkaline, meaning basic. Externally, skin is happiest functioning in a slightly acidic environment due to our acid mantel, the oil skin produces to protect our body from pathogens, provide hydration, and lock in moisture. Without our acid mantel, any little microbe or pathogen that lands on our skin could ultimately kill us. The soil a plant grows in depends on a particular acidity to thrive as well, and every plant has different needs. Without proper pH a plant can be stunted, sick, or even die. Thankfully, being a skin care professional rarely gets that serious. 

THE SKIN CARE-CANNABIS CONNECTION 

While there is so much overlap between our body composition and that of the cannabis plant, there is also a lot of overlap in the skin care and cannabis market. Both have an overabundance of products hitting the shelves on a daily basis. Some of them are good, some of them are great, and some of them leave a lot to be desired. Even as a professional, the competition for your attention is overwhelming, but the same common sense your superior education and pedigree has bestowed upon you as a skin care professional should be equally applied to your CBD and cannabis products as to your traditional skin care. First and foremost, know your state regulations regarding cannabis. While it is a cold hard fact that CBD does not produce a high, it is still a highly regulated ingredient on a federal and state level and demands respect, integrity, and understanding.  

There is an important lesson in the emerging market of ever expanding results-oriented cannabis products: there are many good products out there. They might not be legally compliant, but that doesn’t make them bad. It just makes them noncompliant (illegal). To flip the script, there are many legally compliant products coming out, and more to come as the industry expands, that may not be very good. Therefore, it is the skin care professional’s job to understand how to decipher the snake-oil from the good stuff. Consider this article an introduction to the process.  

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Antonia Schreiber is a New York State licensed massage therapist, cosmetologist specializing in aesthetics science, and electrologist. With over 16 years’ experience in the industry, Schreiber’s work has brought her everywhere from the classroom to her certified green spa, the Windham Spa, to the United States Olympic Training Center and beyond. Outside of the treatment room she is a writer, speaker, and consultant with the New York State Department of Education, leading education firms and industry magazines. Antonia’s current passion projects include treatment research and development for burn patients, and assisting in the development of the United States Paralymic Bobsled and Skeleton Team. 

Kisses From Cannabis: CBD Lip Love 

The perfect pucker is mandatory for Valentine’s Day, even if the only person you are kissing is your reflection (No shame!). The good news is that cannabis not only has a myriad of uses during the month of love but is an especially good ingredient to perfect your pout all year long. 

COMPLEX SYSTEMS

Cannabidiol (CBD) is one of over 400 cannabinoids from the cannabis plant. Cannabinoids are compounds that are exclusively extracted from the cannabis plant and have a range of potential therapeutic benefits, such as easing anxiety, reducing inflammation, and anti-viral and antimicrobial properties, just name a few. Additionally, humans already have a network of receptors in our body that work with cannabinoids.  

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Antonia is a New York State licensed massage therapist, cosmetologist specializing in aesthetics science, and electrologist. With over 16 years’ experience in the industry Antonia’s work has brought her everywhere from the classroom to her certified green spa, the Windham Spa, to the United States Olympic Training Center and beyond. Outside of the treatment room she is a writer, speaker, and consultant with the New York State Department of Education, leading education firms and industry magazines. Antonia’s current passion projects include treatment research and development for burn patients, and assisting in the development of the United States Paralymic Bobsled and Skeleton Team.  

Get Loud: An Introduction to Cannabis 

Cannabis, weed, ganja, marijuana, pot, budthe plant goes by many names. William Shakespeare had it right when Juliet said, “What’s in a name? That which we call a rose by any other name would smell as sweet.” For the sake of professionalism and out of respect for a plant that has been used medicinally by humans for millennia, we are only going to refer to it as cannabis. For thousands of years, humans have cultivated cannabis all over the world, from the Himalayas to South America. It has only been within the last 40 to 50 years that we have taken a heavy scientific interest in the plant, even though it was named by the scientific community all the way back in 1753.

The hope is that cannabis, CBD, and all the extracts related to it will continue to change the aesthetics industry for the better. Along with that change, we are compelled as experts to advocate, educate, and promote best practices with any ingredient, and cannabis is no different. 

 

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Antonia Schreiber is a New York State licensed massage therapist, cosmetologist specializing in aesthetics science, and electrologist. With over 16 years of experience in the industry, Schreiber’s work has brought her everywhere from the classroom to her certified green spa, The Windham Spa, to the U.S. Olympic Training Center and beyond.  Outside of the treatment room, she is a writer, speaker, and consultant with the New York State Department of Education, leading education firms and industry magazines. Her current passion projects include treatment research, development for burn patients, and assisting in the development of the United Statess Paralympic Bobsled and Skeleton Team. 

Perfecting Patience: Communication, Acknowledgment, & Dealing with Difficult Clients

Dealing with difficult clients is part of in any customer service job, whether in the front of the spa, a service provider, or management. Aestheticians come across difficult clients in a myriad of ways. They could be perpetually tardy or rude. Clients could be combative, despite making the decision to come see a professional for a service. However, the onus is not always on the client. Sometimes skin care professionals must take responsibility for a difficult situation or negative outcome.

 

 

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Holding Onto Hope: Looking to the Future During an Uncertain Time

Life is full of surprises, the unexpected twists and turns that fate leads us to and from in our personal and professional lives can be overwhelming and profound. As aestheticians, we live very structured professional lives. We have preset appointments for services that are standardized times, protocols, and ingredients. We have skin care and sanitation regimens built into our psyches that are second nature to us. If we are lucky, we can even rely on the fact that many of our clients will see us regularly for their monthly service of choice. If you ask me, that means we might be mildly type-A personalities – even if it is just in our professional lives.

 

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Antonia Schreiber

 

 

 

Antonia Schreiber is a New York State licensed massage therapist, cosmetologist specializing in aesthetics science, and electrologist. With over 16 years’ experience in the industry, her work has brought her everywhere from the classroom, to her certified green spa – The Windham Spa. Outside of the treatment room, she is a writer, speaker, and consultant with the New York State Department of Education, leading education firms and industry magazines. Schreiber’s current passion projects include treatment research and development for burn patients and assisting in the development of the U.S. Paralympic Bobsled and Skeleton Team.

5 Ways to Make Your Aesthetic Practice More Green

We live in a world where being environmentally minded is not only a necessity for the health of the planet, but it also happens to be a very hip and marketable practice. Everyone is trying to be more environmentally sound, from big box stores to mom and pop shops in small town United States. Reduce, reuse, and recycle are part of everyday vernacular. Being green at the end of the day is about making conscious decisions about how individuals consume and live their daily lives. As aestheticians, that means making little decisions regularly within the aesthetics practices that have a big impact on the environment. You may not realize it, but there is a good chance you are already one step ahead of the game to having a greener practice. Here are five simple ways to make an aesthetics practice greener overnight.

 

Use less cotton

 Every facial uses tons of cotton and where does it end up? In the trash – used once and chucked. This is a horrifying practice. Keep cotton (gauze, pellon, and paper products) to a minimum. Invest in some good towels instead or use reusable cotton baby diapers (without the liner) as half of towels because they are smaller, so they take up less room in the washer, and they are super durable. Go to the baby section in a store and check them out.

 

Switch incandescent light bulbs to LED

 

This allows the spa to pay less on its electric bill and uses way less energy. The bulbs also happen to live as long as a human, so they will not need to be switched often.

 

Recycle

 

Recycle whatever and whenever possible. An empty mask jar – repurpose or recycle it. Do not forget to clean it first though. Those cardboard boxes a new handheld device came in – break them down and recycle them. Keep it out of the garbage and it is a win for everyone.

 

Add plants to the treatment room

 

They look pretty, they make people happy, and they clean the air. No light or low light? No problem – get a snake plant, angel fern, or pathos. They need barely any light at all to live happily. Just water and enjoy.

 

Use organic and biodynamic products

 

It seems like this would be a given to greening a practice but use organic and biodynamic skin care products at every chance. Commit to going green and swap out an entire line if necessary. Even if it is one product at a time, make a change to supporting companies that are healthier for clients and the environment. It can be more costly to go organic, so take baby steps and start with one product at a time. There is no need to dive in headfirst, but it will not hurt either.

 

Starting with these five simple steps, any spa can make an effort to be greener and have a long-lasting impact on clients and the environment.

 

Antonia Schreiber

 

 

 

Schreiber is a New York State licensed massage therapist, cosmetologist specializing in aesthetic science, and electrologist. With over 16 years of experience in the industry, her work has brought her everywhere from the classroom, to her certified-green spa – The Windham Spa, to the United States. Olympic Training Center and beyond. Outside of the treatment room, she is a writer, speaker, and consultant with the New York State Department of Education, leading education firms and industry magazines. Her current passion projects include treatment research and development for patients, and assisting in the development of the U.S. Paralympic Bobsled and Skeleton Team. 

February 2024

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  • Celluma by Biophotas, Inc
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