U.SK Under Skin Advanced Hydra Acids Balm

U.SK Under Skin’s Advanced Hydra Acids, is an innovative hydrating illuminator balm that contains a unique alpha and poly hydroxy acid blend as well as low-weight hyaluronic acid, rhamnose rich polysaccharides and U.SK Under Skin’s patented Pro-Skin Calming complex, which results in an effective chemical exfoliation without the irritation, giving users the glowing, soft and hydrated skin they desire. Please note: This product is available exclusively through authorized physicians.
(800) 870-7818  https://www.underskin.com/

Read more...

Seborrheic Keratosis

Seborrheic keratosis is amongst the most common cutaneous (skin) lesions and affects approximately eighty-three million Americans. It is a benign (non-cancerous) skin condition that appears as a brown, black, or tan growth. While one lesion can appear on its own, multiple growths are more common. They tend to develop in older Americans appearing on the face, chest, shoulders, or back with a waxy, scaly, and slightly elevated appearance. Seborrheic keratoses grow slowly, in groups or singly. Most people will develop at least one seborrheic keratosis during their lifetime. They are harmless and do not require treatment. If the client finds the lesions irritating, a medical provider can remove it for them.

The United States reports more than three million cases each year.

  • Both sexes are affected equally.
  • As with any skin condition, seborrheic keratosis requires a medical diagnosis.
  • Treatment is not necessary because the lesions are benign but can be removed for cosmetic purposes, irritation, or if bleeding occurs.

Common symptoms include itchiness, small bumps on the skin, and waxy elevated skin lesions.

APPEARANCE

The appearance of seborrheic keratoses can vary widely. Color can range from a light beige or tan to a deeper brown or even ebony. Some seborrheic keratoses have a texture that is rough, wart-like, and bumpy with a grainy surface that crumbles easily.

  • Other seborrheic keratoses are smooth and waxy.
  • They are usually round or oval-shaped.
  • While some seborrheic keratoses are very small, others may grow up to 13 to 16 inches in diameter.
  • Some skin care professionals mistake a seborrheic keratoses for warts, moles, skin tags, or skin cancer.

Contact a medical provider if multiple lesions develop over a short period of time or if irritation or bleeding occurs. Any suspicious changes in the skin, including growths, lesions that bleed, or don’t heal, should always be diagnosed because the growth could be cancerous.

CAUSES

The cause of seborrheic keratosis is unknown. Genetics may play a role as these growths tend to be hereditary. Ultraviolet exposure can also factor into the development of seborrheic keratoses. Some studies support the development of seborrheic keratoses following sun exposure. More research is needed because seborrheic keratoses also develop on skin that has not been exposed to ultraviolet rays.

RISK FACTORS

The first risk factor is age, as most seborrheic keratoses develop over the age of 50. It is rare for a child to develop seborrheic keratoses. Most people develop these growths during middle age or later. The number of seborrheic keratoses tends to increase with age. Some women develop seborrheic keratoses during pregnancy or after estrogen replacement therapy, which would suggest a possible hormonal component to this condition. Light-skinned individuals are most likely to develop these harmless growths. The next most common group are individuals with medium to dark skin.

In dark-skinned ethnicities, seborrheic keratoses tend to be small and appear around the eyes.

Removal Options

The issue with many removal methods is that they can be painful and may trigger post-inflammatory hyperpigmentation.

  • Cryosurgery is a method that involves freezing seborrheic keratosis with liquid nitrogen.
  • Curettage involves scraping the lesion from the surface of the skin.
  • Electrocautery is the burning of the growth(s) with an electric current.
  • Ablation is done through laser removal that vaporizes the lesion.
  • Apple cider vinegar dissolves the seborrheic keratosis.

PROTOCAL

  • Saturate a two-by-two piece of gauze or cotton ball in apple cider vinegar.
  • Secure the soaked implement with a Band-Aid for 10 to 15 minutes.
  • Remove and cleanse with warm soap and water.
  • Allow the area to dry unbandaged.
  • Repeat daily for two weeks.

CHEMICAL PEELS             

Chemical peels containing 20% to 70% glycolic acid have been used by dermatologists to treat seborrheic keratoses and other skin lesions.

PRESCRIPTION TREATMENT METHODS

The FDA-approved hydrogen peroxide 40% topical solution (Eskata–Aclaris Therapeutics) can be used for the treatment of raised seborrheic keratoses in adults. Treatment included a single in-office session where the solution is applied to the lesions four times, approximately one minute apart. Unfortunately, the medication did not achieve popularity, so the company discontinued production in 2019.

Wart Peel (5-FU 2.5%/salicylic acid 17%) is a prescription medication used to treat seborrheic keratoses at home, with weekly office follow-ups. Typically prescribed in a five milliliter tube, this medication can address one to two dozen lesions (size-dependent), which is a very cost-effective option for clients.

A good skin care professional is always well educated. While the aesthetician is unable to treat this condition for their client, they can undoubtedly educate and refer them to a medical professional who can offer options for treatment and removal.

 

 

Brenda Linday 2014

 

 

Brenda Linday is a licensed aesthetician, licensed aesthetic instructor, and certified aesthetic consultant with over 16 years’ experience in the medical aesthetic industry. Linday serves as a consultant for medical and aesthetic companies desiring to build strong sales and education teams. She develops clinical and sales education content, and trains sales and educational units, clinicians, physicians, and distributors around the world. Linday is also a featured author in many industry publications. Her passion is sharing her wealth of knowledge with other like-minded professionals who believe that education is the key to building lasting relationships with our clients, making each clinician more successful by increasing client satisfaction. Reach her at This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. or @LindayConsult.

 

 

Aloe Foundation

Oil-free, fragrance free, antioxidant rich with a base of water and aloe for extra protection from the elements. Sheer, natural coverage that is buildable and allows the skin to “breathe”. Excellent for all skin types.
8004522116  GINAMARIE Products

Read more...

GM Revolution Shatters Expectations in their New Launch of a Men’s Luxury

GM Revolution, a new men’s luxury skincare brand, is proud to announce the launch of its Signature Line. The collection of products are formulated to promote skin health and wellness. The professional line has been created to combat against any misconceptions and to normalize men’s skincare.

“We understand that a skincare line cannot change the world. But we know that it can change people. And people can change the world. It is the mission of GM Revolution to give others the confidence to accomplish their goals and make purposeful changes,” says Michael McGuire, GM Revolution.

For more information visit www.GMRevolution.com.
8004522116  gmrevolution

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Hydra Refine Astringent Pads by Repechage

Now, you can wipe away excess oils, while refining pores to create a perfect complexion in one easy step. Hydra Refine Astringent Pads come pre-saturated with powerful natural ingredients, including hydrating and refining laminaria saccharina seaweed extract, antioxidant farnesol—an extract of Lily of the Valley, brightening licorice root extract, astringent and fragrant Lemongrass, and soothing aloe and cucumber to help smooth the skin, while it helps reduce the appearance of oiliness and large pores.

Size: Contains 60 pads
1-800-248-SKIN (7546)   repechage.com

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Anti-Aging Serum

With key ingredients such as Hyaluronic Acid, Niacin, Vitamin E, Bakuchiol, Peptides, Green Leaf Tea Extract this anti-aging serum stimulates circulation within the skin, evens skin tone, lessens brown spots, hydrates and nourishes while helping to reverse and correct sun damage and heal problematic skin.
8004522116  gmrevolution

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Moisturizer

Made from a combination of highly-refined Soybean Oil and Vitamin E, this moisturizer works hard to hydrate the skin, while diminishing fine lines and scarring. In addition, this moisturizing oil is an excellent beard conditioner to restore softness and shine.
8004522116  gmrevolution

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7 Secrets Every Aesthetician Should Know About Skin of Color

The skin care market is growing but there is still an untapped need for personalized skin care services for people of color. Women and men of color are looking for skin care specialists who understand their unique skin care needs. Unfortunately, many aestheticians never receive adequate training on skin of color in aesthetics school. Getting quality education on how to treat the unique structure and function of different skin tones is critical for all aestheticians who desire to provide quality services. Below are seven secrets every aesthetician should know about diverse skin types.

 

AFRICAN-AMERICANS ARE NOT THE ONLY DEMOGRAPHIC WITH SKIN OF COLOR 

In fact, skin of color is defined as skin which is non-caucasian and falls within the Fitzpatrick III-VI skin types. Demographic groups with skin of color include Africans, African-Americans, Afro-Caribbeans, Hispanics, Asians, Pacific Islanders, Native Americans, and Middle Easterners. As indicated by the United States census, by the year 2050, over half of the United States’ population will be people of color.

 

ALL SKIN IS NOT THE SAME
Unfortunately, many aestheticians are under the impression that “skin is skin” and that all skin reacts the same. This is far from the truth. Many research studies have shown that skin of color has a structure and function that is unique to caucasian skin. For example, transepidermal water loss (TEWL) is the total amount of water lost in the skin. Some studies have found that black and Asian skin have TEWL that is 1.1 times greater than that of caucasian skin, leading to an open barrier that could cause them to be more irritant-prone. 

 

THERE ARE SKIN DISEASES THAT ARE UNIQUE TO PEOPLE WITH SKIN OF COLOR
Because of the differences in the structure and function of skin of color, skin diseases present differently in comparison to caucasian skin. Some of the common disorders found in skin of color are post-inflammatory hyperpigmentation, pseudofolliculitis barbae, melasma, vitiligo, and acne keloidalis nuchae. It is important for aestheticians to be aware of how differences in skin physiology impacts the presence of certain skin diseases in various skin tones.

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EuniceCofieObengEunice Cofie-Obeng is the founder, chief executive officer, chief chemist, and licensed aesthetician of Nuekie, an innovative skin care company for people of color. Eunice holds a Bachelor of Science degree in chemistry and molecular biology from Florida Agricultural and Mechanical University, a Master of Science degree in pharmaceutical sciences with an emphasis in cosmetic science from the University of Cincinnati, and a certificate in global leadership and public policy for the 21st Century from Harvard Kennedy School of Government Executive Education program. She is a sought-after expert on the topics of cosmetic science, skin of color, and entrepreneurship.

Cleanser

Formulated for all skin types, the cleanser cleans, exfoliates, and stimulates the skin all in one. The cleanser is water-based and infused with Vitamin E that works hard to keep the skin hydrated and youthful all day. With Hydrogen Peroxide, it is perfect for acne prone skin. It is also great for deep scalp cleansing and for wet shaving.
8004522116  gmrevolution

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Ultra Soothing Cleanser Colloidal

Oatmeal derives from the whole de-hulled oat grain – a natural product recognized since ancient times. Its enriched chemical composition is responsible for a variety of clinical properties, from cleansing to moisturizing, antioxidant, and anti-inflammatory properties. Ultra Soothing Cleanser Colloidal is the ideal cleansing medium for skin experiencing hypersensitivity, skin that is damaged due to climatic over exposure or extremely dehydrated skin

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U.SK Under Skin Advanced Hydra Acids Balm

U.SK Under Skin’s Advanced Hydra Acids, is an innovative hydrating illuminator balm that contains a unique alpha and poly hydroxy acid blend as well as low-weight hyaluronic acid, rhamnose rich polysaccharides and U.SK Under Skin’s patented Pro-Skin Calming complex, which results in an effective chemical exfoliation without the irritation, giving users the glowing, soft and hydrated skin they desire. Please note: This product is available exclusively through authorized physicians.
(800) 870-7818  https://www.underskin.com/

Read more...

Seborrheic Keratosis

Seborrheic keratosis is amongst the most common cutaneous (skin) lesions and affects approximately eighty-three million Americans. It is a benign (non-cancerous) skin condition that appears as a brown, black, or tan growth. While one lesion can appear on its own, multiple growths are more common. They tend to develop in older Americans appearing on the face, chest, shoulders, or back with a waxy, scaly, and slightly elevated appearance. Seborrheic keratoses grow slowly, in groups or singly. Most people will develop at least one seborrheic keratosis during their lifetime. They are harmless and do not require treatment. If the client finds the lesions irritating, a medical provider can remove it for them.

The United States reports more than three million cases each year.

  • Both sexes are affected equally.
  • As with any skin condition, seborrheic keratosis requires a medical diagnosis.
  • Treatment is not necessary because the lesions are benign but can be removed for cosmetic purposes, irritation, or if bleeding occurs.

Common symptoms include itchiness, small bumps on the skin, and waxy elevated skin lesions.

APPEARANCE

The appearance of seborrheic keratoses can vary widely. Color can range from a light beige or tan to a deeper brown or even ebony. Some seborrheic keratoses have a texture that is rough, wart-like, and bumpy with a grainy surface that crumbles easily.

  • Other seborrheic keratoses are smooth and waxy.
  • They are usually round or oval-shaped.
  • While some seborrheic keratoses are very small, others may grow up to 13 to 16 inches in diameter.
  • Some skin care professionals mistake a seborrheic keratoses for warts, moles, skin tags, or skin cancer.

Contact a medical provider if multiple lesions develop over a short period of time or if irritation or bleeding occurs. Any suspicious changes in the skin, including growths, lesions that bleed, or don’t heal, should always be diagnosed because the growth could be cancerous.

CAUSES

The cause of seborrheic keratosis is unknown. Genetics may play a role as these growths tend to be hereditary. Ultraviolet exposure can also factor into the development of seborrheic keratoses. Some studies support the development of seborrheic keratoses following sun exposure. More research is needed because seborrheic keratoses also develop on skin that has not been exposed to ultraviolet rays.

RISK FACTORS

The first risk factor is age, as most seborrheic keratoses develop over the age of 50. It is rare for a child to develop seborrheic keratoses. Most people develop these growths during middle age or later. The number of seborrheic keratoses tends to increase with age. Some women develop seborrheic keratoses during pregnancy or after estrogen replacement therapy, which would suggest a possible hormonal component to this condition. Light-skinned individuals are most likely to develop these harmless growths. The next most common group are individuals with medium to dark skin.

In dark-skinned ethnicities, seborrheic keratoses tend to be small and appear around the eyes.

Removal Options

The issue with many removal methods is that they can be painful and may trigger post-inflammatory hyperpigmentation.

  • Cryosurgery is a method that involves freezing seborrheic keratosis with liquid nitrogen.
  • Curettage involves scraping the lesion from the surface of the skin.
  • Electrocautery is the burning of the growth(s) with an electric current.
  • Ablation is done through laser removal that vaporizes the lesion.
  • Apple cider vinegar dissolves the seborrheic keratosis.

PROTOCAL

  • Saturate a two-by-two piece of gauze or cotton ball in apple cider vinegar.
  • Secure the soaked implement with a Band-Aid for 10 to 15 minutes.
  • Remove and cleanse with warm soap and water.
  • Allow the area to dry unbandaged.
  • Repeat daily for two weeks.

CHEMICAL PEELS             

Chemical peels containing 20% to 70% glycolic acid have been used by dermatologists to treat seborrheic keratoses and other skin lesions.

PRESCRIPTION TREATMENT METHODS

The FDA-approved hydrogen peroxide 40% topical solution (Eskata–Aclaris Therapeutics) can be used for the treatment of raised seborrheic keratoses in adults. Treatment included a single in-office session where the solution is applied to the lesions four times, approximately one minute apart. Unfortunately, the medication did not achieve popularity, so the company discontinued production in 2019.

Wart Peel (5-FU 2.5%/salicylic acid 17%) is a prescription medication used to treat seborrheic keratoses at home, with weekly office follow-ups. Typically prescribed in a five milliliter tube, this medication can address one to two dozen lesions (size-dependent), which is a very cost-effective option for clients.

A good skin care professional is always well educated. While the aesthetician is unable to treat this condition for their client, they can undoubtedly educate and refer them to a medical professional who can offer options for treatment and removal.

 

 

Brenda Linday 2014

 

 

Brenda Linday is a licensed aesthetician, licensed aesthetic instructor, and certified aesthetic consultant with over 16 years’ experience in the medical aesthetic industry. Linday serves as a consultant for medical and aesthetic companies desiring to build strong sales and education teams. She develops clinical and sales education content, and trains sales and educational units, clinicians, physicians, and distributors around the world. Linday is also a featured author in many industry publications. Her passion is sharing her wealth of knowledge with other like-minded professionals who believe that education is the key to building lasting relationships with our clients, making each clinician more successful by increasing client satisfaction. Reach her at This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. or @LindayConsult.

 

 

Aloe Foundation

Oil-free, fragrance free, antioxidant rich with a base of water and aloe for extra protection from the elements. Sheer, natural coverage that is buildable and allows the skin to “breathe”. Excellent for all skin types.
8004522116  GINAMARIE Products

Read more...

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