Understanding Urticaria: Triggers, Causes, Types, and Variances

Urticaria pronounced ur-tuh-keh-ree-uh is another term for hives (wheals). The term comes from Latin origin with “urere,” meaning to burn and “urtica,” meaning nettle. More modern interpretation comes from the European “stinging nettle” Urtica Dioica. Three million Americans are affected with urticaria each year. Classified as a rash, urticaria presents as itchy, raised, red, or skin-colored welts on the surface of the skin. A form…

Keratosis Pilaris

Keratosis pilaris (follicular keratosis or lichen pilaris) is a frustrating, yet prevalent skin condition experienced by approximately 40 million individuals worldwide. It is caused by a build-up of the protein keratin in the skin. The build-up of keratin blocks the hair follicle, eventually producing the bump. About three million cases are reported in the United States each year. It estimated that 50% to 80% of…

Varieties of Dermatitis

Healthy skin has optimal levels of hydration, while sensitive skin is usually dry on the surface, suffers from transepidermal water loss, inflammation, edema, and dilated capillaries. Dermatitis is inflammation of the skin, due to a skin condition, contact with an irritant, or an allergic reaction. There are several forms of dermatitis, but this article will focus primarily on atopic dermatitis with additional information on allergic…

Can You Spot the Difference? Couperose Versus Rosacea

These two conditions are often confused; however, they are two diverse skin concerns. Couperose skin presents as red, dry, and tight but is not inflamed. Meanwhile, rosacea symptoms include inflammation, flushing, papules, pustules, and in some cases, changes in the tissue itself. Couperose indicates the presence of weakened blood vessels, due to the lack of elasticity in the skin. Rosacea is a vascular disorder with…

Vitiligo

Did you ever wonder why Michael Jackson started to wear a white glove? While it may have been the beginning of a fashion trend, it was most likely an ingenious way to conceal a skin disorder – vitiligo. Arnold Klein, MD, Michael Jackson’s dermatologist, observed in 1983 that Jackson had vitiligo. Initially, to treat his condition, Jackson used a light tone of makeup and skin-bleaching…

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