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Fact or Fiction

Cosmetic products are being created on a daily basis. Some are only sold through aestheticians and doctor’s offices, while others are readily available via television shopping channels, infomercials, online retailers, or department stores and drugstores. Consumers often end up feeling confused about who to trust, where to shop, and whether to spend their hard-earned money at the spa or the drugstore. Where is the best place to buy a skin care product? There is no easy answer – it really depends on the skin care needs a person is trying to address; drugstore skin care products and products created for the professional industry usually have very different characteristics.

A tan is needed to show adequate absorption of vitamin D.

Written by Celeste Hilling, CEO, co-founder, and product formulator for Skin Authority

Fiction! Having a tan does not mean you are vitamin D sufficient. In fact, because pigment slows down the absorption of UVB, your natural tan is your body’s way of slowing the production of D.

Facial exercises can help prevent sagging skin.

Written by Dasha Saian, co-founder and CEO of SAIAN

How many people have heard about face yoga or facial exercises, but are unsure if these methods really work for tightening sagging skin? There are a number of YouTube tutorials, books, and miscellaneous information on the subject available online, which may confuse the general public.

Sun exposure is good for acne.

Written by Lina Kennedy, president of Alexandria Professional

Sun exposure is something everyone needs to stay healthy. Soaking in the warm sun is a relaxing way to enjoy a vacation, but how much sun is too much? With summer in full affect, it is time to consider the truth surrounding the old wives' tale of sun exposure being beneficial for acne.

Bar Soap Ages the Skin

Written by Janel Luu, founder and CEO of Le Mieux Cosmetics

Bar soap is often summarily judged and misunderstood as the villain that hijacks skin's natural moisture factor, leading to signs of aging. However, many bar soaps have undergone a metamorphosis due to formulations that make them anti-aging heroes for many skin conditions.

Lemon Lightens the Skin.

Written by Rachelle Dupree, marketing and communications director for Vivoderm Natural Skincare

Fresh lemon juice has been known for decades as a household remedy for lightening the skin. Many clients may be wondering, however, if it truly works. The basic answer is yes, but the lightening process does take time.

Products that contain parabens should be avoided.

Written by Sheilah Danielle Fulton, L.E., L.E.I., MBA, published writer

The use of paraben preservatives, such as alkyl esters and p-hydroxybenzoic acids, goes back over decades to when they were first introduced in the 1920s.1 Nowadays, synthetic parabens are found in 80 percent of all personal care products, including cosmetics. These preservatives are widely used because of their antimicrobial impact. There are various types of synthetic parabens, such as methylparaben, ethyparaben, proplparaben, and butylparaben.

Skin damage caused by HEV light may be as harmful as the damage caused by UVA and UVB light combined.

Written by Brenda Linday L.E., L.E.I., C.A.C., owner of Linday Aesthetic Consulting

High energy visible (HEV) light is high-frequency and high-energy light ranging from approximately 380 to 500 nanometers in the blue band of the visible portion of the electromagnetic spectrum and is also referred to as blue light or near ultraviolet light. Sources of blue light include the sun, full spectrum lighting, flat screen monitors, cell phones, and tablets. Additionally, reflective surfaces, including sand, snow, water, glass, and even concrete, are sources of HEV light.

It is important to use a separate eye cream from a facial moisturizer.

Written by Amanda Azar, L.E., founder and executive artist at Azar Beauty

Facial skin is thinner and behaves differently than the skin on the rest of the body. The skin around the eyes, however, can be up to 90 percent thinner than the rest of the already delicate facial skin. Furthermore, the ocular area contains significantly fewer oil glands, which can cause dehydration and premature signs of aging. The eyes are sensitive to internal expressions and external environmental factors that escalate collagen breakdown within the skin. Habitual facial movements, like squinting, smiling, winking, looking surprised, and frowning, have a dramatic effect on the eye area. These expressions and other influences, including smoking, sun exposure, lack of sleep, and alcohol consumption, cause wrinkles around the eye (crow's feet).

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