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Friday, 21 April 2017 08:39

What’s your recipe for treating skin during the summer heat?

Written by   Denise Baron, wellness expert and business strategist

The eyes, skin, and liver are extremely sensitive during the summer months. Whether professionals are working with clients to achieve healthy summer skin or treating clients who struggle with acne, rosacea, or eczema, there are lessons to be learned from ancient medical systems.

A healthy skin care routine is about diet and lifestyle. Hot weather and extended sun exposure can dry and damage the skin and intensify some skin conditions. Help clients get glowing, healthy skin from within by encouraging them to aid their body in countering these effects by integrating some of the following practices into their life.

 

DIET
For healthy skin practice, knowing which foods to eat during each season is key. Chinese medicine practitioners identify food as having cooling, heating, or neutral characteristics.

Cooling foods can help to expel heat and toxins; they include asparagus; cucumbers; sweet potatoes; broccoli; green, leafy vegetables; zucchini; and green beans. Sweet, ripe fruits, like cherries, plums, grapes, pineapples, peaches, and mangoes, are also cooling foods.

Clients should avoid or reduce foods that heat them up; these foods have a heating effect on the liver, can lead to inflammation, and have a poor effect on the skin. Heating foods include red meat, hot and spicy dishes, and sour foods. Tomatoes and garlic can also have a heating effect. Advise clients to eat these in moderation or balance them with a cooling food.

Rose petal jam is a great cooling food with a cooling element. It is a savory, sweet-scented, calming food. This jam is a must-have in the kitchen, in addition to fresh, sweet berries. It is a refreshing treat to offer to clients and is perfect on toast or as a summer snack.
Olive, sunflower, and coconut oils are great for balancing the body. A teaspoon of coconut oil in the mouth before breakfast will help stimulate digestion and cool down the liver.

Alcohol has a heating effect on the body – consider tonics and teas as an alternative. Experiment with creating cooling drinks. Try hibiscus and mint tea or mix pomegranate juice, coconut water, and crushed ice. Professionals may wish to have a pitcher of water with mint and cucumber on hand to welcome and refresh clients as they wait for services.

Drinking from a silver cup has special cooling effects. Have fun searching for a set of sterling cups from a local flea market and serve clients a cool cup of water in one of the cups after their treatment with a note thanking them for coming in for service.

BODY IN BALANCE
Healthy skin is about keeping the body in balance; cooling the system is about slowing down. In addition to diet, clients can also help to cool their body through the other senses using essential oils, meditation, and music.

Essential Oils and Sprays
Sandalwood is the professional's secret weapon. Placing even a tiny drop on the client's forehead will help bring down the excess heat in the body. Clients will feel immediately refreshed. Other essential oils and remedies to use to cool, heal, and calm the skin are rose water, meadowfoam seed oil, fraction coconut oil, clary sage, geranium, pomegranate seed oil, vitamin E, goat milk powder, oatmeal, egg whites mixed with lemon juice, aloe, neem, buttermilk, and ghee.

Meditation and Music
Playing soothing music during services is key. Sounds of waterfalls or raindrops can have a soothing effect in the brain and body. Teach clients the yogic "Cooling Breath," also known as Sitali. This simple technique will help reduce anger and agitation and pacify excess heat in the body. For clients with acne, rosacea, and eczema, use these practices in combination with Ayurvedic wands. The precious metals in the wand help draw out heat and toxins from the skin. Lastly, invite clients to try 10 minutes of meditation before sleeping. Getting a good night's rest is key for calm and clear skin.

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