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The Health Benefits of Cranberries and Cranberry Juice: - September 2010

The Health Benefits of Cranberries and Cranberry Juice:

  • Avoid Urinary Tract Infection: Cranberry juice is very effective against urinary tract infections. 100 percent cranberry juice produces hippuric acid in the urine, which acidifies the urine and prevents bacteria from sticking to the walls of the bladder. Drinking one glass of cranberry juice daily reduces the risk of infections and prevents cystitis. Cranberry juice also contains the chemical compounds called proanthocyanidins, a powerful antioxidant that decreases the adherence of bacteria to the bladder cells.
  • Healthy Cardiovascular System: Cranberry juice contains powerful antioxidants that help to prevent or repair the damages caused by free radicals. Drinking cranberry juice helps in the increase of good cholesterol and the reduction of bad (LDL) cholesterol. These benefits can be attributed to the presence of polyphenols in cranberry juice.
  • Prevents Tooth Decay: Strengthens Bones and Teeth: According to new researches, cranberry juice prevents cavities. The chemical contained in the juice, blocks the bacteria from sticking to the teeth. Thus, it prevents the formation of dental plaques. Although cranberry juice is also a source of calcium, many juice companies add extra calcium in the juice. Natural or otherwise, it reduces the risk of getting osteoporosis.
  • Prevents Cancer: Cranberry contains proanthocyanidins. These compounds inhibit the growth of various cancer cells. According to studies, proanthocyanidins can stop micro-tumors from developing in the blood vessels necessary for their continued growth. Regular consumption of cranberry juice prevents the rapid growth of tumors. Chemicals in cranberries also prevent multiplication of breast cancer cells.
  • Cures Cold: Fresh cranberry juice is effective at fighting against infections. It cures sore throats and colds. According to conducted studies, cranberry juice helps to inhibit certain strains of the Haemophilus influenza, which is a common cause of ear and respiratory infections in children. The juice inhibits the bacteria's hair-like structures, therefore not allowing them to be able to adhere to skin surfaces.
  • Good for Obese People: Cranberry juice is rich in organic acids. These have an emulsifying effect on the fat deposits in our body. So it is good for people who want to shed those extra pounds.
  • Prevents Formation of Kidney Stones: The high amount of acid components in cranberry juice prevents kidney stone formation.
  • Prevents Stomach Ulcers: H. pylori bacteria can cause stomach ulcers. Regular cranberry juice consumption, for months, destroys these bacteria and saves you from such stomach related troubles.
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History of Cranberries - September 2010

History of Cranberries

The cranberry, along with the blueberry and Concord grape, is one of North America's three native fruits that are commercially grown. Cranberries were first used by Native Americans, who discovered the wild berry's versatility as a food, fabric dye, and healing agent. Today, cranberries are commercially grown throughout the northern part of the United States and are available in both fresh and processed forms.
The name "cranberry" derives from the Pilgrim name for the fruit, "craneberry", so called because the small, pink blossoms that appear in the spring resemble the head and bill of a Sandhill crane. European settlers adopted the Native American uses for the fruit and found the berry a valuable bartering tool.
In 1816, Captain Henry Hall became the first to successfully cultivate cranberries. By 1871, the first association of cranberry growers in the United States had formed, and now, U.S. farmers harvest approximately 40,000 acres of cranberries each year.
The cranberry is a relatively small, red berry which grows on low-hanging vines in temperate zones in many regions of the United States and other parts of the world. Cranberry is a member of the same family of plants as bilberry and blueberry. Cranberry can be taken as a juice, the whole berry, or from an extract.
For maximum health benefit, cranberry juice should be unsweetened. It is a refreshing drink. Unsweetened cranberry juice tastes slightly sour but for medicinal purposes, 2 ounces of cranberry juice diluted in 8 ounces of water is recommended. It is good for your overall health.
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Survival of the Fittest - September 2010

Survival of the Fittest

by Christine Cowheard,
founder/CEO of A Natural Difference Skincare

Suppose you had to choose just one fruit for your overall health and skin care regimen.
Would you not select the only one that could assist in
repairing and preventing sun damage, enable moisture
retention, improve cellulite, disable bacteria, provide a healthy scalp with shiny hair, and possibly reduce cancerous tumors? Cranberry does all of this and more.
If you were to compare the phytonutrient values of fruits, cranberry would come out on top every time. Providing vitamins C, A, E, and K with an abundance of nutrients, minerals and amino acids, there really is only one clear choice.
The American Cranberry (Vaccinium Macrocarpon) was revered by Native Americans for its medicinal and preservative qualities. Early settlers caught on quickly to its varied benefits and even hauled cranberries across the ocean when sailing back and forth to the New World, when they discovered that cranberry prevented scurvy, a dietary deficiency of vitamin C.
Modern science however, is constantly calculating cranberry uses that go way beyond scurvy prevention.
New methods of determining nutrient values and ingredient functioning have produced multiple reports on the benefits of this nutrient rich fruit. For decades western physicians have recommended cranberry juice to combat urinary tract
problems, both as a curative and preventative. There are in vitro studies where cranberry juice has shown to interrupt the life cycle of the H. Pylori stomach bacteria. Recent strides are even pointing to the amazing ability of proanthocyanidins in cranberry to reduce cancerous tumors.
The benefits of consuming cranberries in all available forms are well documented. These same scientific principles and applications translate into superb topical advantages when the cranberry's natural compounds are scientifically infused with other ingredients by experienced formulators.
Cranberry is an excellent source of Omega-3, Omega-6, and Omega-9 fatty acids which have shown to improve collagen and elastin skin fibers, plus assist in the reduction of UV and environmental damage. These balanced omegas provide the same moisture retaining properties as fish oil without the ghastly odor.
Natural compounds called proanthocyanidins disable certain harmful bacteria while amazingly keeping the good bacteria intact. The combined antibacterial and anti-viral capabilities make cranberry an excellent ingredient for acne and psoriatic formulations.
cranberries
Cranberry's extremely high antioxidant content helps prevent and repair stress and age related degeneration while improving circulation. The cranberry's antioxidant content is higher than any of the top 20 common fruits.
So whenever possible use cranberry in your daily diet, nutritional and skin care choices.

 

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Fish Oil Linked to Reduction in Breast Cancer Risk - September 2010

Fish oil reduces the risk of breast cancerFish Oil Linked to Reduction in Breast Cancer Risk

A recent study suggests that regular use of fish oil supplements may reduce the risk of breast cancer. These findings were published in the journal of Cancer Epidemiology, Biomarkers & Prevention.
Researchers from the Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center recently evaluated what, if any, impact specialty supplements have on breast cancer risk.
In this study, more than 35,000 post-menopausal women completed a 24-page questionnaire to evaluate their use of non-vitamin, non-mineral “specialty” supplements. The women in this study did not have a history of breast cancer and did not have breast cancer when they enrolled in the study. During six years of follow-up, 880 study participants developed breast cancer. Of the specialty supplements used by the women in this study, only fish oil was associated with a reduced risk of breast cancer. Risk of breast cancer was 32 percent lower among women who regularly used fish oil supplements.
The results of this study will need to be confirmed by additional studies. The researchers note: “Fish oil is a potential candidate for chemo-prevention studies. Until that time, it is not recommended for individual use for breast cancer prevention.” Because the full range of effects of many dietary supplements is not well understood, patients should talk with their doctor about any dietary supplements that they are using
or considering. 

1 Brasky TM, Lampe JW, Potter JD et al. Specialty Supplements and Breast Cancer Risk in the VITamins And Lifestyle (VITAL) Cohort, Cancer Epidemiology, Biomarkers & Prevention. 2010; 19(7):1696–708.

Copyright© Susan G. Komen for the Cure®

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Bra wearing habits - September 2010

Bra wearing habits:

Bra Wearing HabitsIn a study by Singer and Grismaijer in 1995, three out of four women studied who wore a bra for 24 hours a day developed breast cancer compared to one out of 168 who wore a bra rarely or never. That is a huge difference, and the implication is clear. Your first line of defense in preventing breast cancer is to severely limit how many hours a day you wear a bra. Bras do not cause the cancer initially but they restrict the flow of lymph within breast tissue, thereby hindering the normal cleansing process of the breast tissue. Many environmental toxins and pesticides that cause and promote cancer are "fat-loving" and so they tend to reside in the breast tissue. Lymph fluid carries away waste products, dead cells, and toxins.

Copyright© 007 Breasts

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Breast Cancer and Nutrition - September 2010


Breast Cancer and Nutrition

Breast cancer nutrition

Vitamin E: Women consuming other forms of vitamin E called tocotrienols have been found to have dramatically lower risk of contracting breast cancer – 50 percent less risk for women without family history of breast cancer, and as much as 90 percent for pre-menopausal women with family history.
Copyright© 007 Breasts

flaxsedFlaxseed: Also known as linseed, Flaxseed is an ancient grain that may have originated in Egypt. The seeds, oil, and seed meal can be used in many ways. Flaxseeds contain phytoestrogens, which may reduce your risk of breast cancer and possibly prevent a recurrence. They have two anti-cancer components: lignans and an omega-3 fat called "alphalinolenic acid" (ALA). Flaxseeds may also be helpful in reducing your risk of heart disease, osteoporosis, breast and endometrial cancers. Flaxseed oil has been used for the relief of hot flashes, breast pain, arthritis pain, and pain related to constipation. Several studies have been done to determine how the phytoestrogens in flaxseeds may help cancer. One theory compares the estrogen-receptor blocking ability of flaxseeds with estrogen-receptor modulation drugs. The weak plant-
based estrogens block the estrogen receptors on cells within breast tissue, starving them of full-strength female estrogen, possibly stopping tumor growth and preventing cell damage. This effect may be most effective for younger, pre-menopausal women with estrogen-receptor negative cancers.
Copyright© About.com

soySoy: In laboratory studies, animal studies, and research looking at groups of people and what they eat, certain chemical components of soy have been linked to a lower risk of breast and prostate cancer. Most studies that have shown benefit have used whole soy protein rather than soy components and extracts. As a protein source, soybean products are promoted as a healthier alternative to meat and as an aid to weight loss. Soy products are also used to lower cholesterol and blood pressure, and to relieve symptoms of menopause and osteoporosis. Soy protein in a diet low in saturated fat and cholesterol is also promoted as a method to help reduce the risk of heart disease. Soy can be consumed in many forms with tofu, soy milk, roasted soybeans, soy powder, and textured vegetable protein being some of the more popular. Soy protein powders and bars are available in nutrition stores and health food markets.
Copyright© The American Cancer Society®

omega 3Omega-3 fatty acids: Omega-3 fatty acids are considered essential fatty acids. They are necessary for human health but the body cannot make them – you have to get them through food. Omega-3 fatty acids can be found in fish, such as salmon, tuna, and halibut, other seafood including algae and krill, some plants, and nut oils. Also known as polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs), omega-3 fatty acids play a crucial role in brain function as well as normal growth and development. They have also become popular because they may reduce the risk of heart disease. Research shows that omega-3 fatty acids reduce inflammation and may help lower risk of chronic diseases such as heart disease, cancer, and arthritis. Although not all experts agree, women who eat foods rich in omega-3 fatty acids over many years may be less likely to develop breast cancer. More research is needed to understand the effect that omega-3 fatty acids may have on the prevention of breast cancer.
Copyright© 2010 University of Maryland Medical Center

garlicGarlic: Garlic is a vegetable commonly used to enhance the flavor of foods. Garlic is currently under study for its ability to reduce cancer risk. However, there is not enough evidence at this time to support eating large amounts of garlic or taking garlic supplements for cancer prevention. It is reasonable to include garlic as part of a balanced diet, unless one has a particular health problem or is taking medication that has been shown to be adversely affected by garlic. Garlic and garlic supplements are sometimes promoted to prevent or treat cancer. Several compounds in garlic may have anti-cancer properties, but compounds of one type in particular – the allyl sulfur compounds – are said to play a major role. These compounds reportedly help the body get rid of cancer causing chemicals and help cause cancer cells to die naturally, a process called apoptosis. There have also been claims that garlic has immune boosting properties that may reduce
cancer cell growth and help the body fight off diseases such as colds or the flu. These claims are currently being studied. Proponents claim garlic can be used to treat bacterial, yeast, fungal, and
parasitic infections and can be used to treat high blood sugar levels. They also say it has properties that may help stomach and abdominal problems. Garlic has also been claimed to reduce risk of heart disease, lower cholesterol, and reduce blood pressure.

Copyright© The American Cancer Society®

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The Five Steps of a Breast Self - September 2010

The Five Steps of a Breast Self-Exam

Breast selfexaminationStep 1: Begin by looking at your breasts in the mirror with your shoulders straight and your arms on your hips. Here is what you should look for:
  • Breasts that are their usual size, shape, and color
  • Breasts that are evenly shaped without visible distortion or swelling

If you see any of the following changes, bring them to your doctor's attention:

  • Dimpling, puckering, or bulging of the skin
  • A nipple that has changed position or an inverted nipple (pushed inward instead of sticking out)
  • Redness, soreness, rash, or swelling

  • Step 2: Now, raise your arms and look for the same changes.

    Step 3: While you are at the mirror, look for any signs of fluid coming out of one or both nipples (this could be a watery, milky, or yellow fluid or blood).

    Step 4: Next, feel your breasts while lying down, using your right hand to feel your left breast and then your left hand to feel your right breast. Use a firm, smooth touch with the first few finger pads of your hand, keeping the fingers flat and together. Use a circular motion, about the size of a quarter. Cover the entire breast from top to bottom, side to side — from your collarbone to the top of your abdomen, and from your armpit to your cleavage. Follow a pattern to be sure that you cover the whole breast. You can begin at the nipple, moving in larger and larger circles until you reach the outer edge of the breast. You can also move your fingers up and down vertically, in rows, as if you were mowing a lawn. This up-and-down approach seems to work best for most women. Be sure to feel all the tissue from the front to the back of your breasts: for the skin and tissue just beneath, use light pressure; use medium pressure for tissue in the middle of your breasts; use firm pressure for the deep tissue in the back. When you have reached the deep tissue, you should be able to feel down to your ribcage.

    Step 5: Finally, feel your breasts while you are standing or sitting. Many women find that the easiest way to feel their breasts is when their skin is wet and slippery, so they like to do this step in the shower. Cover your entire breast, using the same hand movements described in Step 4.

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    Part 2: What Causes Dandruff? - September 2010

    Dandruff
    Part 2: What Causes Dandruff?

    The exact cause of dandruff, also known as scurf or Pityriasis simplex capillitii is unknown. However, most experts do agree that it is not caused by poor hygiene.

    Causes may include, but are not limited to:
    • Not enough hair brushing: People who do not comb and/or brush their hair regularly have a slightly higher risk of having dandruff. This is because they are not aiding the shedding of skin that combing and/or brushing provides.
    • Yeast: People who are sensitive to yeast have a slightly higher risk of having dandruff, so it is logical to assume that yeast may play a part.
    • Dry skin: People with dry skin tend to get dandruff more often.
    • Seborrheic dermatitis (irritated, oily skin): People with seborrheic dermatitis are very prone to dandruff.
    • Not enough shampooing: Some people say that if you do not shampoo enough there can be a buildup of oil and dead skin cells, causing dandruff. However, many experts doubt this is true.
    • Certain skin conditions: People with psoriasis, eczema, and some other skin disorders tend to get dandruff much more frequently than other people.
    • Some illnesses: Adults with Parkinson's disease and some other neurological illnesses are more prone to having dandruff and seborrheic dermatitis. Patients recovering from heart attacks and strokes, and some people with weak immune systems may have dandruff more often than other people.
    • Reaction to hair or skin care products: Some people react to some hair care products with a red, itchy, scaling scalp.
    • Malassezia: Malassezia is a fungus that lives on everybody's scalp. Generally, it will cause no problems at all. However, it can grow out of control. It feeds on the oils our hair follicles secrete. When this happens the scalp can become irritated and produce extra skin cells. These extra skin cells die and fall off; they mix with the oil from hair and scalp, and turn into what we see as dandruff.
    • Diet: Some experts say that people who do not consume enough foods that contain zinc, B vitamins, and some types of fats are more prone to dandruff.
    • Mental stress: Experts believe there is a link between stress and many skin problems.
    • HIV: A study found that 10.6 percent of people with HIV have seborrheic dermatitis.

     

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    NPA Products 300 strong - September 2010

    NPA Products 300 strong

    NPA Products 300 StrongConsumers who care about the quality of their personal care products now have hundreds of reasons to look for the “certified natural” seal of approval on their purchases. The Natural Products Association (NPA) is pleased to announce that more than 300 natural personal care products have been certified through its two-year old natural standard certification program.
    Under the NPA’s program, to merit bearing the seal, products must follow strict guidelines set by the association. Products must be made up of at least 95 percent natural ingredients – coming from a renewable or plentiful
    source found in nature (flora, fauna, mineral). Non-natural ingredients are allowed only when viable natural alternative ingredients are unavailable and only when there are absolutely no suspected potential human health risks. Products cannot
    use animal testing beyond what is required by law, and must
    use a majority of bio-degradable and post-consumer recycled content in their packaging.
    NPA also certifies ingredients as natural. These 100 percent natural ingredients can be used by manufacturers to develop products that are in compliance with the natural standard. Currently, there are 100 certified natural ingredients.
    Copyright© WorldPressOnline.com

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    De-Stress with Herbs - September 2010

    De-Stress with Herbs

    De-Stress with Herbs

    For physical and mental well-being, it is crucial to find ways to slow down. Herbal rituals: A teatime, a long soak in an herbal bath, and a restful slumber with an herbal pillow can help soften the pace.

    Herbal Tea Time
    Whether you need to relax before climbing into bed, de-stress after a busy day at work, or even get your day off on the right (calm) foot, a cup of herbal tea can help. Try different herbs that are known for their soothing properties, then pick your favorites and enjoy them solo or in combinations. As a general guideline, use about a teaspoon of herb per cup of water, and steep for about 15 to 20 minutes.

    Copyright© Frontier™ Natural Products Co-op

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