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Lomi Balm
By Jeremy Lawrence | January 16, 2019
If joint pain, muscle stiffness or inflammation is zapping your energy, Ola Tropical Apothecary’s Lomi Balm may be just what you need to hit the ground running again–naturally.

Ola Tropical Apothecary’s Lomi Balm is a natural analgesic product inspired by the traditional uses of Hawaiian medicinal plants. Consulting with Big Island Kumu Lomi, Dane Silva, Lomi Balm was created to target minor aches and pains of muscles and joints.

Lomi Balm harnesses the powerful anti-inflammatory, anti-bacterial and antioxidants of Hawaiian medicinal plants, infused with the warming and cooling sensation of menthol and camphor essential oil making it ideal to relax sore muscles, stress and tension.

Key ingredients are infused into a premium blend of organic tropical oils of coconut, kukui, macadamia, avocado, and tamanu and include:

• ʻŌlena (Turmeric) - Relieves inflammation |High in Anti-oxidants | Anti-bacterial | Anti-septic |Anti-microbial;
• ʻUhaloa (Waltheria americana and W. indica) - Stimulates Circulation |Anti-inflammatory;
• Ginger Root - Purifying and Stimulating |Anti-inflammatory |Anti-irritant;
• Noni Fruit - High in Anti-oxidants | Anti-inflammatory;
• ‘Awa (Kava Kava) - Promotes relaxation and tranquility | Soothing for muscles and tension;
• Lemongrass - Antiseptic | High in Antioxidants |High in Vitamin C;
• Hawaiian Chili Pepper - High in vitamin C |Relieves pain;
• Passion Flower - High in Anti-oxidants | Soothing |Anti-inflammatory.

Hawaiian Beeswax is also used to provide a synergistic and holistic medium to help maximize all the healing benefits.

Ola Tropical Apothecary’s Lomi Balm has a suggested retail price of $24 for a 2 ounce jar (a larger 6 ounce jar is available for spa/wellness professionals). To view the entire Ola Tropical Apothecary collection or to make a purchase please visit, www.hawaiianbodyproducts.com.

About:
Ola Tropical Apothecary is a natural-based bath and body spa collection centered on the Hawaiian concept of beauty and wellness. Each of the Company’s hand-crafted bath and body products combine beneficial botanicals, oils, fruits, sea elements and flowers in the time-honored, traditional Hawaiian way. By supporting Ola, you support local small farmers and business, as well as a Company that is responsible, transparent and sustainable. Please visit www.hawaiianbodyproducts.com for more information.


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By William Strunk | January 16, 2019

If there is one word that is synonymous with summer, it is sun – and, since July is national UV Safety Month, there is no better time of year to promote safe summer skin care! Do not let the weather be the only thing that heats up during these warm, summer months. Through specific, seasonal marketing focused on sun and summer skin care, professionals can boost sales, reconnect with clients, and watch as profits begin to sizzle, too.

 

HERE COMES THE SPA

 

Begin with small efforts around the spa. Use signs, posters, and charts about safe sun practices, statistics about the results of improper sun care, and pictures of common melanoma warning signs. Offer free skin cancer screenings, marketing these screenings to new and existing clients. Remind visitors that sunscreens expire. Then, prominently display sun care products where guests will be sure to see them, using props like coolers, umbrellas, and beach balls to further draw attention.

 

Next, consider the spa’s menu. Refresh lingo, products, and treatments to reflect the glowing, bright summer skin many clients seek during summer. Highlight treatments and products featuring fruit and have fun with menu names, specials, and packages.

 

Keep the spa’s clientele in mind when deciding what will work best. If located in an area where business typically decreases during the summer as people travel, do not let the sun does not have to set on the spa. Boulders Resort and Spa in Arizona draws in business by offering a summer program called “License to Spa,” where Arizona residents can show their drivers’ licenses and get a discount on services. For areas where the sun does shine, and tourist traffic is high, capitalize on the increase of visitors. Nurture Nook Day Spa in Tennessee plays off travel season, calling one of its summer packages a “Summer Spa Passport.” Whatever the situation, be creative and think summer!  

 

SOLAR-POWERED PARTIES

 

Another marketing tactic that is hot right now is hosting spa events. Recently, the Meritage Resort and Spa in California held a poolside event with a representative from their favorite skin care company in which guests of the resort could have sunscreen applied, try samples, and enter to win prizes. Consider hosting an event themed around sun or summer skin care to further boost sales, schedule services, and connect with new and existing clients.

 

At a sun care-themed event, hold a short seminar, or question and answer session, on sun care topics such as SPF and protecting skin from within. Then, match the other event elements to these topics. For instance, debut new sunscreens and link the event’s foods and drinks to snacks rich in antioxidants, vitamin C, and other nutrients that boost the skin’s natural defense against ultraviolet damage. Each year, Sunflower Dermatology and Medical Day Spa in Missouri hosts a sunblock party with food, drinks, products, and activities all centered on the theme of wearing sunscreen.

 

Another option is to host an event all about summer skin care. Similarly, the event could feature a short seminar, this time outlining an ideal summer homecare routine, emphasizing how summer weather or activities can dehydrate skin or fuel oil buildup. Then, make sure to have a retail table with single products or baskets made up of moisturizers, cleansers, exfoliants, hydrating masks, and so forth.

 

Events like these create an inviting atmosphere for potential and existing clients to bring their friends and have fun, all the while providing breezy opportunities for professionals to book appointments and sell products – without feeling overly salesy.

 

Through implementing summer-themed spa invents and ensuring that the spa is sun-kissed and summer-ready, professionals will surely improve connections with future and current clients improve, increase retail sales, and set bottom line revenue ablaze.



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By | January 16, 2019

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January 16, 2019


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By | January 16, 2019

tea-tree-lip-balmThis recipe will yield a protective tea tree sheen and powerfully fresh flavor punch.

2 teaspoons beeswax
2 tablespoons jojoba oil
3 drops each of peppermint and sweet orange essential oils
2 drops tea tree essential oil

Directions: Measure beeswax and jojoba into a small metal bowl and place in a shallow pan of simmering water until wax is melted and fully incorporated into the jojoba oil. Remove bowl from simmering water and add essential oils. Stir and pour into an empty lip balm tube or small salve container. Cap and allow to set. Apply to lips as needed.

Modify the recipe accordingly to obtain the desired consistency; more oil equals more glide and thinner coating on the lips. More wax equates to better protection but can feel a bit sticky and has a sometimes undesirable "drag" to it when applied. Most of all – have fun!

Copyright© Frontier Natural Products Co-op

 



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By | January 16, 2019

This recipe will yield a protective tea tree sheen and powerfully fresh flavor punch.

2 teaspoons beeswax
2 tablespoons jojoba oil
3 drops each of peppermint and sweet orange essential oils
2 drops tea tree essential oil

Directions: Measure beeswax and jojoba into a small metal bowl and place in a shallow pan of simmering water until wax is melted and fully incorporated into the jojoba oil. Remove bowl from simmering water and add essential oils. Stir and pour into an empty lip balm tube or small salve container. Cap and allow to set. Apply to lips as needed.

Modify the recipe accordingly to obtain the desired consistency; more oil equals more glide and thinner coating on the lips. More wax equates to better protection but can feel a bit sticky and has a sometimes undesirable "drag" to it when applied. Most of all – have fun!

Copyright© Frontier Natural Products Co-op

 



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By | January 16, 2019

by James E. Upperman and Laura L. Root, CST, CIDESCO Diplomate

It sounds relatively simple, doesn’t it? A cleanser, an aftershave balm, a sun protection product, possibly a lip balm. But what makes a product line distinctly male-oriented versus “unisex” can be elusive and much of the distinction lies in observing the male creature, as well as in the marketing and promotion of the products. A hard look at men and women’s skin care habits reveals very different routines, leaving a significant departure in the aspect of product acceptance by men. The dilemma is exposed when one researches the sales numbers, retail selection, and presentation of male-only products for the spa market. Indeed, men still remain a somewhat elusive target in the spa, not to mention the fact that not all professionals are able take advantage of the opportunity to market to the “metrosexual” market.

Men vs. Women

Women are inherently (could it be genetic?) willing to utilize as many as four to six steps in their skin care regimen: cleanser, a serum for hyperpigmentation, a serum for anti-aging, an eye treatment product, a moisturizer, and most definitely sun protection. Even ladies who are “bare bones” will use a sun protection product after cleansing. Men, on the other hand, like to swipe their bar of soap in the shower over their face, through their hair, lather up, rinse, and call it a day after the possibility of slapping aftershave onto their now-irritated skin. The challenge to the manufacturer – and thus the retailer – is to provide products with key ingredients that will improve the skin in as few steps as possible, while keeping the change to men’s daily habits to a minimum. This is one of the many reasons why men’s skin care product lines are somewhat under-represented in the marketplace, compared to product lines with a focus on women – men for the most part just don’t want to “mess” with all that effort.

A further observation of men’s skin care product retail sales reveals an important surprise: Most initial purchases of men’s products are gifts. As a result, the opportunity to give your staff the opening to provide skin care instructions to men is minimal at best. Perhaps you are now beginning to see why fewer skin care product options exist for men.

It is all about habits and the availability for an opportunity. Menu items such as “Sports Facials” may draw some male clients in for deep-cleaning facial treatments, or even the possibility of gift certificate sales for the lady’s “significant other” - and this then provides the true professional opportunity to both use and sell products to men.

Skin Care Objectives for Men

The professional must remember that whether shaving with a more traditional shave cream and razor or with an electric shaver, men have one thing in common. They are exfoliating on a daily basis – and you will recall what occurs after microdermabrasion when it is followed by strongly acidic products – so aggressive exfoliants in cleansers should be used with caution.

Supplying hydration and some exfoliation assistance is necessary, while providing antioxidant protection, as well as tissue regeneration for anti-aging. Frequently we find a focus on low levels of glycolic, salicylic, or lactic acid represented in men’s products to encourage cellular turnover, and deep hydration is created by hyaluronic acid. Anti-inflammatory botanicals, such as galbanum, boswellia serrata, and hmp seed, help to calm post-shave irritation. Light formulations including Shea Butter also help to boost antioxidant protection. For an almost-fool-proof initial product introduction, the professional may direct the client (either the male client or female client looking for a special gift) to the new biotechnology peptides, which are some of the safest anti-aging ingredients provided in products today. If the potential client has a tendency to ingrown hair (PFB), then the selection of products that include the extremely anti-inflammatory, antibacterial, and lypophyllic salicylic acid is very appropriate for the prevention and maintenance of that skin condition.

“Just the Facts, Ma’am”

Using this information, we are able to ascertain what men are willing to do in a daily skin care regimen. They cleanse their faces, shave, and (hopefully) use sunscreen or a moisturizer after shaving. The products that can qualify as replacements for soap and water and shave cream are only the products that do what the user is willing and accustomed to doing. Recognizing this, why don’t we combine some of the functions and utilize the ingredient technologies beneficial to the skin by focusing on function and adding treatment products to the basic functionality of what men will use:

1. Cleanser with Dual Purpose

The most utilitarian option is a cleanser containing lactic acid that also works as a shaving gel for the blade-shaving gentlemen. This cleanser can be used as a simple cleanser by those using electric razors. Lactic acid will provide a gentle, moisturizing cleanse, while allowing the gel to lather sufficiently for a blade-shaver. Thinking this through to the logical conclusion, if they don’t shave, most likely they are probably not gracing you with their presence at all. Other ingredients that should be considered in a men’s cleanser are galbanum extract to promote cellular regeneration, married with hemp seed oil, for their soothing components.

2. After Shave with Dual Purpose

The after shave balm class of products is a practical option for the inclusion of performance ingredients, while substituting for the after shave lotion that most men are accustomed to using. Keep in mind that the first purchase is usually a gift, so this product needs to have broad application, and avoid a skin classification conflict. In reviewing your own experience with men’s professional services, there will likely be universal agreement that pore congestion and exfoliation are the two needs you observe during those services. An additional need will be for an anti-aging regimen, which has nothing to do, of course, with gender!

3. Ancillary Men’s Skin Care Products that sell well

Lip Balm with SPF can be an “impulse” purchase with benefits – if it is an outstanding product, men could be enticed to seek out more of the same! Sun protection for men is a moral sales objective – as it should be for the ladies, as well. The dilemma in retailing sun protection is in finding an outstanding product that men won’t find objectionable because of its fragrance or consistency – a light gel or lotion with little to no scent is important if they are going to purchase and actually use the product!

A spot-treatment salicylic acid product is extremely utilitarian for those clients with acne or pseudo-folliculitis barbaei, and if its product contains anti-inflammatory botanicals with a pleasing, not-too-fluffy scent, all the better – especially for the teenage male client.

Now the Obvious

Men want products that look like their own, not the opposite sex’s. Therefore, packaging becomes extremely important and its presentation on your shelf equally so. Men are very reluctant to openly use their wife’s products, but may well use them surreptitiously a time or two. For those targeted outcome treatment products that you want to add to a men’s skin care regimen presentation, you will want to seek out unisex packaging for cross-over sales. The closet cosmeceutical client, a business will not make, but properly packaged and results-targeted product can build your men’s product sales.

The Reward

In recent years, men’s product sales have been growing, because men appear to have a stronger brand loyalty because of their tendency to maintain a set routine. Women will see an intriguing product and try it on a whim, but men generally do not make impulse purchases. However, because men have a much more ingrained “habit” instinct, the professional will begin to appreciate this, because once a routine is set with a men’s product, the sales are more likely to be repeat sales.

When marketing men’s products, the retail space and associated presentation must be closely considered, and the best way to provide an introductory offer is through gift presentation promotions. When picking a line of products for your male clientele, balancing products with broad interest with ingredient technologies to match the client’s needs that frequent your spa is important because you may not have the opportunity to actually provide a skin analysis. Keeping in mind that the majority of men’s products are first purchased as gifts, but if they work and if they use them, the rewards are long lived.

Licensed in aesthetics in both Arizona and Oregon, Laura L. Root is a Nationally Certified Surgical Technologist and CIDESCO Diplomate. She also consults with physicians and other professionals in formulating skin care products. A multi-modality training manual co-authored with Jim E. Upperman will be available this fall. Root’s most recent publication is The Skin Care Professional’s Chemistry and Ingredient Handbook. For more information, Laura may be contacted via e-mail at llroot@cox.net or through www.estheticeducationresource.com

James E. Upperman is a Physician’s Assistant with a B.S. in Medical Science, who expanded his training by specializing in Ear, Nose, and Throat; and Plastic Surgery, in addition to taking Medical Administrative courses. He has also worked as a supervisory Physician’s Assistant and Medical Administrator. Upperman has collaborated with Root to develop Antiqua Prima, a professional skin care line to address the needs of clients with inflammatory and acneic conditions. He may be contacted via e-mail at antiquaprima@aol.com.



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By Jeremy Lawrence | January 16, 2019

It sounds relatively simple, doesn’t it? A cleanser, an aftershave balm, a sun protection product, possibly a lip balm. But what makes a product line distinctly male-oriented versus “unisex” can be elusive and much of the distinction lies in observing the male creature, as well as in the marketing and promotion of the products. A hard look at men and women’s skin care habits reveals very different routines, leaving a significant departure in the aspect of product acceptance by men.

The dilemma is exposed when one researches the sales numbers, retail selection, and presentation of male-only products for the spa market. Indeed, men still remain a somewhat elusive target in the spa, not to mention the fact that not all professionals are able take advantage of the opportunity to market to the “metrosexual” market.

Men vs. Women
Women are inherently (could it be genetic?) willing to utilize as many as four to six steps in their skin care regimen: cleanser, a serum for hyperpigmentation, a serum for anti-aging, an eye treatment product, a moisturizer, and most definitely sun protection. Even ladies who are “bare bones” will use a sun protection product after cleansing. Men, on the other hand, like to swipe their bar of soap in the shower over their face, through their hair, lather up, rinse, and call it a day after the possibility of slapping aftershave onto their now-irritated skin. The challenge to the manufacturer – and thus the retailer – is to provide products with key ingredients that will improve the skin in as few steps as possible, while keeping the change to men’s daily habits to a minimum. This is one of the many reasons why men’s skin care product lines are somewhat under-represented in the marketplace, compared to product lines with a focus on women – men for the most part just don’t want to “mess” with all that effort.
A further observation of men’s skin care product retail sales reveals an important surprise: Most initial purchases of men’s products are gifts. As a result, the opportunity to give your staff the opening to provide skin care instructions to men is minimal at best. Perhaps you are now beginning to see why fewer skin care product options exist for men.
It is all about habits and the availability for an opportunity. Menu items such as “Sports Facials” may draw some male clients in for deep-cleaning facial treatments, or even the possibility of gift certificate sales for the lady’s “significant other” - and this then provides the true professional opportunity to both use and sell products to men.

Skin Care Objectives for Men
The professional must remember that whether shaving with a more traditional shave cream and razor or with an electric shaver, men have one thing in common. They are exfoliating on a daily basis – and you will recall what occurs after microdermabrasion when it is followed by strongly acidic products – so aggressive exfoliants in cleansers should be used with caution.
Supplying hydration and some exfoliation assistance is necessary, while providing antioxidant protection, as well as tissue regeneration for anti-aging. Frequently we find a focus on low levels of glycolic, salicylic, or lactic acid represented in men’s products to encourage cellular turnover, and deep hydration is created by hyaluronic acid. Anti-inflammatory botanicals, such as galbanum, boswellia serrata, and hmp seed, help to calm post-shave irritation. Light formulations including Shea Butter also help to boost antioxidant protection. For an almost-fool-proof initial product introduction, the professional may direct the client (either the male client or female client looking for a special gift) to the new biotechnology peptides, which are some of the safest anti-aging ingredients provided in products today. If the potential client has a tendency to ingrown hair (PFB), then the selection of products that include the extremely anti-inflammatory, antibacterial, and lypophyllic salicylic acid is very appropriate for the prevention and maintenance of that skin condition.

“Just the Facts, Ma’am”
Using this information, we are able to ascertain what men are willing to do in a daily skin care regimen. They cleanse their faces, shave, and (hopefully) use sunscreen or a moisturizer after shaving. The products that can qualify as replacements for soap and water and shave cream are only the products that do what the user is willing and accustomed to doing. Recognizing this, why don’t we combine some of the functions and utilize the ingredient technologies beneficial to the skin by focusing on function and adding treatment products to the basic functionality of what men will use:

1. Cleanser with Dual Purpose
The most utilitarian option is a cleanser containing lactic acid that also works as a shaving gel for the blade-shaving gentlemen. This cleanser can be used as a simple cleanser by those using electric razors. Lactic acid will provide a gentle, moisturizing cleanse, while allowing the gel to lather sufficiently for a blade-shaver. Thinking this through to the logical conclusion, if they don’t shave, most likely they are probably not gracing you with their presence at all. Other ingredients that should be considered in a men’s cleanser are galbanum extract to promote cellular regeneration, married with hemp seed oil, for their soothing components.

2. After Shave with Dual Purpose
The after shave balm class of products is a practical option for the inclusion of performance ingredients, while substituting for the after shave lotion that most men are accustomed to using. Keep in mind that the first purchase is usually a gift, so this product needs to have broad application, and avoid a skin classification conflict. In reviewing your own experience with men’s professional services, there will likely be universal agreement that pore congestion and exfoliation are the two needs you observe during those services. An additional need will be for an anti-aging regimen, which has nothing to do, of course, with gender!

3. Ancillary Men’s Skin Care Products that sell well
Lip Balm with SPF can be an “impulse” purchase with benefits – if it is an outstanding product, men could be enticed to seek out more of the same! Sun protection for men is a moral sales objective – as it should be for the ladies, as well. The dilemma in retailing sun protection is in finding an outstanding product that men won’t find objectionable because of its fragrance or consistency – a light gel or lotion with little to no scent is important if they are going to purchase and actually use the product!
A spot-treatment salicylic acid product is extremely utilitarian for those clients with acne or pseudo-folliculitis barbaei, and if its product contains anti-inflammatory botanicals with a pleasing, not-too-fluffy scent, all the better – especially for the teenage male client.

Now the Obvious
Men want products that look like their own, not the opposite sex’s. Therefore, packaging becomes extremely important and its presentation on your shelf equally so. Men are very reluctant to openly use their wife’s products, but may well use them surreptitiously a time or two. For those targeted outcome treatment products that you want to add to a men’s skin care regimen presentation, you will want to seek out unisex packaging for cross-over sales. The closet cosmeceutical client, a business will not make, but properly packaged and results-targeted product can build your men’s product sales.

The Reward
In recent years, men’s product sales have been growing, because men appear to have a stronger brand loyalty because of their tendency to maintain a set routine. Women will see an intriguing product and try it on a whim, but men generally do not make impulse purchases. However, because men have a much more ingrained “habit” instinct, the professional will begin to appreciate this, because once a routine is set with a men’s product, the sales are more likely to be repeat sales.
When marketing men’s products, the retail space and associated presentation must be closely considered, and the best way to provide an introductory offer is through gift presentation promotions. When picking a line of products for your male clientele, balancing products with broad interest with ingredient technologies to match the client’s needs that frequent your spa is important because you may not have the opportunity to actually provide a skin analysis. Keeping in mind that the majority of men’s products are first purchased as gifts, but if they work and if they use them, the rewards are long lived.

Licensed in aesthetics in both Arizona and Oregon, Laura L. Root is a Nationally Certified Surgical Technologist and CIDESCO Diplomate. She also consults with physicians and other professionals in formulating skin care products. A multi-modality training manual co-authored with Jim E. Upperman will be available this fall. Root’s most recent publication is The Skin Care Professional’s Chemistry and Ingredient Handbook. For more information, Laura may be contacted via e-mail at llroot@cox.net or through www.estheticeducationresource.com

James E. Upperman is a Physician’s Assistant with a B.S. in Medical Science, who expanded his training by specializing in Ear, Nose, and Throat; and Plastic Surgery, in addition to taking Medical Administrative courses. He has also worked as a supervisory Physician’s Assistant and Medical Administrator. Upperman has collaborated with Root to develop Antiqua Prima, a professional skin care line to address the needs of clients with inflammatory and acneic conditions. He may be contacted via e-mail at antiquaprima@aol.com.



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Beard Balm
By Jeremy Lawrence | January 16, 2019

Beards will look healthier and feel less itchy while skin will feel soothed and nourished. Close in texture to a low hold pomade, beard balm tames, shapes, thickens and defines beards and mustaches. Contains premium oils such as organic argan, coconut, jojoba, tea tree and dog rose to provide long-lasting moisture, cleanse, repair and soothe the beard and skin. The combination of shea butter and beeswax keeps the beard and the skin under the beard healthy. The masculine aroma of Spiced Vanilla will leave a lasting impression!



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By | January 16, 2019

Icleanse with either Chella’s Lush Balm or Exfoliating Scrub, and then spray on the Hydrating Tonic to balance the skin’s pH. I follow that with our Master Protocol 7 and SPF 25 Hydrating Daily Moisturizer.

 Headshot



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By Nick Berner | January 16, 2019

It is no secret that today’s men face challenges their forefathers could never have imagined. With an increasingly global economy creating a wave of new competitive challenges, men are seeking every advantage they can access in order to stay ahead of their peers.
One key area for advantage that men are increasingly turning to is their recurring use of skin care products in order to look as young and healthy as possible. Of course, there remain stalwarts who still use just bar soap and water, but their numbers are quickly eroding. Gone are the days when men of all ages shied away from products like cleansers and moisturizers.

To meet this trend, manufacturers have become savvy about differentiating product lines that meet the criteria demanded by men. The most successful manufacturers tailor their product sets with blended actives that address the key differences distinguishing men’s skin from women’s. For example, men’s skin overall is thicker, oilier, holds more collagen for longer, and is, on average, more exposed to sun. Successful manufacturers create products like cleansers, moisturizers, and SPF products with a blend of active ingredients designed to optimize the right balance that restores and protects the skin’s equilibrium. Because most men are function and step-oriented (left brained), men’s skin care manufacturers often combine steps to keep things simple, such as selling a moisturizer with sun protection already included. The same feminine scents of a cleanser or moisturizer that work for women are typically absent in skin care designed for men.
Men have larger pores that also need different protection than pores in women. Smart manufacturers use ingredients with higher molecular structure like flax seed and milk thistle to protect larger pores. Since men typically favor gels over lotions or creams, they are also great candidates for serums that help overcome the typical long-term inflammatory damage from daily shaving.
Combining the effects of an aftershave balm and moisturizer into a single serum product, for example, serves the multi-function role and helps repair, hydrate, and soothe irritated skin. Quality manufacturers work to tailor ingredients to men’s needs, such as using eucalyptus or tea tree oil for circulation, and they use different combinations than used for women’s products.



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By Amra | January 16, 2019

I went to MAC the other day to purchase my favorite BB Cream with the SPF of 50.  I kept looking at the testers that the store had on display and could only find SPF 35 in my Medium Dark BB Cream.  This young, Bettie Paige, MAC representative approached me, wearing her hair in a sultry pinup design and flashy red lips, asking if I needed her help.  I told her I needed the BB Cream that had the 50 SPF, she dropped her head down and let out an apologetic sigh as she told me that MAC no longer sales anything over a SPF of 35 because of the new FDA (Federal Drug Administration) regulations.

Banana Boat had 2 other sunscreens along with the Sport, “Kids” and “Ultra Defense”.

Remembering back to a recent training I was in for a skincare line from Barcelona that was making its way into the states, they addressed the new regulations in regards to sunscreen.   For years sunscreen has been used by millions of people and within the last decade it has seemed that the SPF number has kept rising from 4, 8, 15, 20, 25, 35, 45, 50, 60, 70, 85, 100 and there even existed a sunscreen that had an SPF of 110, made by two well known skincare brands, Banana Boat and Neutrogena.  Now the FDA has decided to put a SPF limit on the manufacturer and that limit is 35.

After the new ruling in 2011, this is how a sunscreen bottle was to be manufactured for consumers.

Back on June 14, 2011, the FDA issued new rules for sunscreen:

“New labeling and testing requirements are effective for all sunscreen products. Many common phrases used on sunscreen products, such as “sunblock,” “waterproof,” “prevents skin cancer,” etc. are no longer permitted by U.S. FDA. In addition, specific testing must be completed for each sunscreen product before other claims about the product’s UVA and UVB protection can be made.”

When they wrote this statement back in 2011, no where did they state anything about the SPF number being a factor.  As I was researching the FDA website I was not able to find any updated contact that stated the implementation of this new regulation so I will address what was shared with me during my product training course. What exactly is SPF?  SPF stands for, Sun Protection Factor, and was presented in 1962 as a way to measure a sunscreen’s effect against UVB light rays.  For the longest time there have only been two categories of light, UVB and UVA, now there is a third, UVC. The UVB rays cause sunburn on the skin whereas UVA rays are able to penetrate farther into the skin causing more damage such as premature aging.UVC is a new forum in the skincare world because UVC rays are the shortest rays.  This means that unlike UVA and UVB wavelengths that are long enough to penetrate through the ozone, UVC rays have not been able to break through the ozone as of yet, although some people may disagree.  Scientists are concerned about the thinning of the ozone layer due to the industrialization the world has gone through and sees no signs of it slowing down which could possibly emit a third kind of ultraviolet ray, UVC, through to earth and touch our skin.

Sunscreen is important to wear because it is able to assist in the blocking of these ultraviolet rays both physically and chemically.

Urban Defense is among many skincare companies providing a tinted SPF moisturizer.

Chemical sunscreen has special ingredients in it that act as filters and reduce ultraviolet radiation penetration to the skin.  Physical sunscreen acts more as a sunblock, it contains ingredients such as titanium dioxide and zinc oxide which physically blocks the ultraviolet radiation.  The titanium dioxide and zinc oxide are so thick that they are not able to rub all the way into the skin leaving a white film.  Companies have gotten wise and started tinting their sunscreen to take away from the unpleasing aesthetic white look it leaves.  That is why more and more companies have tinted their sunscreen, this way the skin looks great and is receiving a broad spectrum sunscreen that is effective for protecting the skin against harmful sun rays.

Tinted moisturizer, lip balm, spray on sunscreen and regular sunscreen.

Now knowing what SPF is, let me talk to you about the numbers. What does it mean if a product has an SPF of 10 in comparison to a product that has an SPF 30?  All this means is that your skin is able to exposed to sun a little longer.The numbers stand for duration, a certain amount of time your skin will be protected.  There is a certain formula for the numbers that is quite involved and unless you have taken calculus and understand logarithms and derivatives then I will explain in a much more simpler version. Most of us are guilty of not applying sunscreen and in return ending up with an undesirable sunburn.  How long was your skin exposed before you received that sunburn or even just a little bit of redness on the skin?  If you were out in the sun for 10 minutes before you received the sunburn then you take that 10 minutes and multiply it by the SPF number you have in your product.  For example if you were to have a sunscreen with an SPF of 35 then you would take 10 (from the 10 minutes without sunscreen before burning) and multiply it by 35 (the SPF number in your sunscreen, 10 x 35 = 350.  The total number of 350 is the amount of minutes your skin is protected before you need to apply more sunscreen.  That would approximately allow your skin protection for about 5 hours, taking away some minutes due to sweat and other ways your sunscreen could be rubbed off of the skin. The SPF number is a great ideal for the amount of time your skin has the ability to be protected from the sun but it does not guarantee that your skin won’t be exposed to UVA and UVB rays.  Your activity level that you partake in causing sweat will take the sunscreen off faster, water can wash away the sunscreen and also too much contact on the skin from either your hands rubbing on it or clothes and other items could cause the sunscreen to come off faster.  That is why it is important to reapply your sunscreen after vigorous activities, swimming and when you notice your skin receiving the slightest sunburn shade.

What rating would you give your sunscreen?

The FDA is also going to be rating sunscreens on a scale of 1-4.  The sun protection factor will be rated as to how good of protection the product has.  As with any rating, the higher the number the better.  So far, I have not seen any products with an FDA approved rating but this is something to be looking forward to in the very near future.

It’s all fun until someone gets a sunburn. Protect your skin and wear sunscreen.

In 1962, they came up with numbering the SPF and in 2014 the numbering system has capped.  This is to protect you, the consumer, from allowing a number to fool you into your skin being protected.  Just because the SPF number is high on the product does not necessarily mean that your skin is receiving that full benefit and that is why the FDA had to step in and make sure that your sunscreen will be effective about being protective.

 



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By Jeremy Lawrence | January 16, 2019

Heat flows from warm to cold objects. As environmental temperature drops, heat is lost from the body. We respond in two ways to a drop in temperature; the first is peripheral vasoconstriction, and the second is an increase in metabolism in an effort to generate more heat. Almost all of the skin’s problems associated with the cold can be derived from these two facts. Cold skin is poorly-functioning skin characterized by dryness, itching, and sub-acute inflammation, all resulting from a greater loss of water. Categorically, you can say that when skin is cold, it shifts into low gear and its ability to function is greatly compromised. Here are 10 suggestions to tell clients to help them survive the winter and protect skin from damage.

1. Use sun protection of at least SPF 30. Remember, the sun’s rays do not go away in the wintertime. While it is not as intense, sunlight still has a lot of UVA and UVB energy. If the skin is exposed, it is vulnerable to ultraviolet damage.

Untitled-62. Make a friend of moisturizers. A cold environment is usually a dry environment. Cool air loses its ability to hold water. As a result, transepidermal water loss goes up, causing the skin to become dry. Heavier moisturizers are generally required to protect the skin from water loss. Dry skin is usually flaky. If the dryness is severe, the skin will crack, making it a very poor barrier for controlling things going in and out of the skin. When you scratch itchy, dry skin, you are compounding the problem. Look for products that contain high water-retaining ingredients such as jojoba, argan, palm, and rice bran oils.

3. Drink an adequate supply of water. Remember, normally you can lose as much as 500 milliliters of transepidermal water a day. That is equivalent to one pint of water. Try to drink two to four ounces of water every couple of hours throughout the day.

Untitled-74. Your diet is critical. Make sure you have an adequate amount of essential fatty acids, as they are vital in helping maintain the moisture barrier. Fats are metabolized by the body to generate heat. One gram of fat will produce nine calories of heat, as opposed to protein and carbohydrate, which produce only four calories per gram. You need not gain weight, but be sure to add good sources of essential fatty acids (EFAs) – salmon,  avocado, and almonds are great sources.

5. Dry, cold skin is the playground of free radicals. Make sure you continue to use antioxidants during the winter, as well as during the summer. Using products with vitamin C and vitamin E and taking these as oral supplements will enhance resistance to free radical damage.

6. Rather than wearing a single, heavy garment, dress in layers. Remember that heat is lost from the body by conduction, convection, and radiation.  While it may seem like a contradiction, if you sweat in the presence of cold temperatures, mainly due to being overly dressed, you will markedly change your heat loss for the worse. Also keep your head covered to retain heat.

Untitled-87. While long, hot showers may be comforting, they are also quite injurious to winter-damaged skin. Avoid prolonged exposure to hot water, which, combined with aggressive soaps, can really tear up the skin barrier. Keep it short and set the water temperature only as hot as you need it to be.

8. Do not forget to protect your lips, as they lose water much faster than your cornified skin. Carry balm that is a combination of sunscreen and emollients and apply it often throughout the day.

Untitled-109. Check the humidity of your home and workplace. If it falls below 60 percent, your skin will tend to lose more moisture. Keep in mind the body is 70 percent water and that water will always go from a higher level to a lower level. If the average American home is comfortably warm temperature-wise, it may be too dry when it comes to humidity level. This is not an insignificant cause of many upper respiratory problems. A humidifier can help.

10. Finally, be aware of the wind chill factor. Frigid air can carry away heat and moisture rapidly from the skin and create an area of damage that can be quite severe. Windy days are extremely damaging to skin. Wear a scarf to cover your face and neck on particularly blustery days.

Look for the signs of cold-damaged skin: It is usually cool to the touch, dry, and flaky, but it can also be characterized by redness, which is a sign of an inflammatory reaction. Consider also that cold-compromised skin is ill-equipped to combat infections, so it is important to give these areas your particular attention. Pay attention to your client’s skin care routine and advise your clients to do the same.


michael-pugliese-2014Michael Q. Pugliese, B.S., L.E. became the third generation CEO of Circadia by Dr. Pugliese, Inc. in 2006. Under his leadership, the Circadia brand has grown to achieve international recognition and distribution. Pugliese is a licensed aesthetician and a member of the Society of Cosmetic Chemists, He regularly attends their education events to stay on the cutting edge of new product development. His compelling original lectures honor the tenets of modern skin science discovered by his grandfather and add today’s application of that information in an ever-changing business and scientific environment.



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