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By | January 18, 2019

21st Century Television is pleased to announce that Naturel Collagen has won the prestigious “Telly Award” for excellence in programming. Naturel Collagen offers anti-aging products that use fish-based collagen, which interacts perfectly with the human body. Naturel Collagen’s products possess epidermal repair properties never before seen in synthetic and bovine-based collagen products.



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21st Century Labs
January 18, 2019

salon-spa21st Century Laboratory produces cutting edge hair care, skin care, spa, cosmetic, and cosmeceutical formulations with natural ingredients and organically grown botanicals, including sulfate free formulations.Our combination of highly specialized equipment and extensive background in the cosmetics industry allows us to innovate or optimize top-notch cosmeceuticals for private labeling. Our methodology at 21st Century Laboratory requires the strictest quality control standards.



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By | January 18, 2019

Every retailer dreams about inventory literally “flying off the shelves”, as the phrase goes. But unless the retailer doubles as a savvy air-traffic controller, carefully overseeing arrivals and departures of items each day, you may encounter turbulence over Milwaukee (or wherever your business is located)!
Effectively managing the flow of inventory from your manufacturer to your clients is one of the most essential aspects of ensuring the success of your business. Few things displease a loyal client more than learning that a favorite product is out of stock. Conversely, nothing deflates the buzz of shopping more than seeing dusty, shopworn merchandise on the shelf, which obviously isn’t moving—the result of over-ordering.

Especially for a new business, anticipating and averting classic inventory problems will prevent your sales from losing altitude, and keep client satisfaction sky-high.

1 – PLEASE BRING YOUR CALCULATOR TO ITS FULL UPRIGHT POSITION—in other words, you won’t need it. While clients love the personal touch, there is no longer any place for quaint, boutique-style manual accounting, including “eye-balling” stock and issuing handwritten receipts. You must computerize your system to link your inventory to your purchasing process. For instance, spa or salon software may be used to automatically generate a Purchase Order after you have sold a specified quantity of a particular SKU. At the end of the month, review all activity. Note discrepancies and shrinkage—these form a significant part of your map for the future.

Speaking of maps, also note WHERE in the store—what section of square footage—best-selling products are displayed. Work with this “sweet spot” when merchandising; new products, for example, should be displayed there. This sweet spot is often on the right, about ten paces from the entrance, at about eye-level or a little higher.

2 – CHECK IT OUT. Create a log-in/ log-out protocol for the professional products used in the treatment room. It’s a good idea to keep the room stocked with the basics. Each time an empty container is pulled from the room and replaced with a fresh item, the transaction is recorded. Management may then review these numbers at the end of the month; each therapist’s numbers should be about the same.

3- BE A NEW BEST FRIEND to every client and browser. Shoplifting is the wild card in inventory control, yet shoppers don’t appreciate being hovered over by suspicious salespeople. Instead of lurking, coach the team on the floor to make immediate eye contact, engage, step into the client’s air-space in a friendly manner, and ask open-ended questions (“How has your skin been feeling lately, with this weather?”— Whatever that weather may be--) which can lead naturally to sales while the sales associate subtly monitors any disappearances from the shelf.

4 –THINK SOMETHING’S FISHY? Diversion is a huge problem in the professional skin care industry, just as it has long been in the hair care arena. Diversion is especially damaging to clients, since the best skin care products are developed and intended to be prescribed by licensed skin therapists; the client who buys an acne product, cleanser, or exfoliant off the Internet without this advice is being shortchanged. For this reason, we set maximum purchase limits on products, meaning that we won’t let someone come in and snap up all 25 tubes of our best-selling moisturizer. Unless they’re preparing an elephant for a VOGUE cover shoot, no one needs that much moisturizer in a single transaction!

5- KNOW YOUR MANUFACTURER. This is perhaps the biggest “Duh!” factor of inventory control. How long will it take the manufacturer to get the product into your hands from the time you order? The difference between two days and five days can lose you a lot of sales. If the manufacturer is inconsistent, you have two choices: stock up like a crazed, camo-wearing survivalist and hope that your current sales patterns will justify the investment, or find a manufacturer who can give you reliable turnaround.



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By | January 18, 2019

by Tara Rivas

Every retailer dreams about inventory literally “flying off the shelves”, as the phrase goes. But unless the retailer doubles as a savvy air-traffic controller, carefully overseeing arrivals and departures of items each day, you may encounter turbulence over Milwaukee (or wherever your business is located)!

Effectively managing the flow of inventory from your manufacturer to your clients is one of the most essential aspects of ensuring the success of your business. Few things displease a loyal client more than learning that a favorite product is out of stock. Conversely, nothing deflates the buzz of shopping more than seeing dusty, shopworn merchandise on the shelf, which obviously isn’t moving—the result of over-ordering. Especially for a new business, anticipating and averting classic inventory problems will prevent your sales from losing altitude, and keep client satisfaction sky-high.

1 – PLEASE BRING YOUR CALCULATOR TO ITS FULL UPRIGHT POSITION—in other words, you won’t need it. While clients love the personal touch, there is no longer any place for quaint, boutique-style manual accounting, including “eye-balling” stock and issuing handwritten receipts. You must computerize your system to link your inventory to your purchasing process. For instance, spa or salon software may be used to automatically generate a Purchase Order after you have sold a specified quantity of a particular SKU. At the end of the month, review all activity. Note discrepancies and shrinkage—these form a significant part of your map for the future.

Speaking of maps, also note WHERE in the store—what section of square footage—best-selling products are displayed. Work with this “sweet spot” when merchandising; new products, for example, should be displayed there. This sweet spot is often on the right, about ten paces from the entrance, at about eye-level or a little higher.

2 – CHECK IT OUT. Create a log-in/ log-out protocol for the professional products used in the treatment room. It’s a good idea to keep the room stocked with the basics. Each time an empty container is pulled from the room and replaced with a fresh item, the transaction is recorded. Management may then review these numbers at the end of the month; each therapist’s numbers should be about the same.

3- BE A NEW BEST FRIEND to every client and browser. Shoplifting is the wild card in inventory control, yet shoppers don’t appreciate being hovered over by suspicious salespeople. Instead of lurking, coach the team on the floor to make immediate eye contact, engage, step into the client’s air-space in a friendly manner, and ask open-ended questions (“How has your skin been feeling lately, with this weather?”— Whatever that weather may be--) which can lead naturally to sales while the sales associate subtly monitors any disappearances from the shelf.

4 –THINK SOMETHING’S FISHY? Diversion is a huge problem in the professional skin care industry, just as it has long been in the hair care arena. Diversion is especially damaging to clients, since the best skin care products are developed and intended to be prescribed by licensed skin therapists; the client who buys an acne product, cleanser, or exfoliant off the Internet without this advice is being shortchanged. For this reason, we set maximum purchase limits on products, meaning that we won’t let someone come in and snap up all 25 tubes of our best-selling moisturizer. Unless they’re preparing an elephant for a VOGUE cover shoot, no one needs that much moisturizer in a single transaction!

5- KNOW YOUR MANUFACTURER. This is perhaps the biggest “Duh!” factor of inventory control. How long will it take the manufacturer to get the product into your hands from the time you order? The difference between two days and five days can lose you a lot of sales. If the manufacturer is inconsistent, you have two choices: stock up like a crazed, camo-wearing survivalist and hope that your current sales patterns will justify the investment, or find a manufacturer who can give you reliable turnaround.



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By Jeremy Lawrence | January 18, 2019

Great customer service is the cornerstone of any business – keeping clients happy with their services and overall brand will keep them coming back.

Customer service now goes well beyond talking to the front desk staff, calling the customer care line, or even sending an e-mail. Customer service lives on social media, which makes it a very visible part of the business' brand.

This news is great for businesses because social media offers an opportunity to immediately connect with customers, solve any issues, and keep the business at the top of the customer's mind.

pic-1BENEFITS OF CUSTOMER CARE ON SOCIAL MEDIA
Increases Accessibility
Regardless of the industry of a business, that business' customers are on social media: They are engaging with friends and colleagues and while they are at it, they may just engage with a business. Clients take to social media to share their experiences with businesses – good or bad – ask questions, and look for solutions to problems. Sending a tweet, posting to a brand's Facebook wall, or commenting on an Instagram picture can be easier than making a phone call or writing an e-mail because that customer is already actively on the business' social platform. As a business, this access provides an opportunity to answer clients' questions in whichever way is easiest and most accessible.

Engagement Begets Engagement (and Trust)
The more skin care professionals engage with clients online, the more others will begin to engage with the professional. If a client sees the professional answer another client's question or resolve a complaint on social media, that client will be more likely to reach out to the professional on social media. Responding directly to the client on the platform in which they asked the question also allows current and potential clients to see the great customer service the professional offers. This engagement not only encourages professionals to be more active with their online presence, but also builds trust with their clients. Furthermore, the more people the professional engages with on these platforms, the more searchable and discoverable their profile becomes, making it easier for new clients to find them.

Expanding the Relationship Beyond the Treatment Room
Building a social media presence for the spa and engaging with clients online allows the professional to foster and grow connections with clients even when they are not receiving a service. Extending good customer service to any feedback the professional receives on social media, positive or negative, reinforces the positive experiences the client has had within the treatment room and the spa. This response furthers the connection the client feels to the business and the brand.

Third Party Recommendations
Recommendations from friends and family can make a huge difference when potential clients are deciding where or from whom to receive a service. The same can be said for online reviews and conversations. The internet has opened up a world of research that allows people to explore others' experiences with something they may want to try and many people turn to social media for such research. Engaging in customer service online creates a history of those conversations for others to view when looking for a service, which could draw new clients to the professional's business.

pic-2Social Listening
Monitoring what people are saying about the spa on social media platforms is called social listening. Fostering conversations across social media also allows professionals another avenue to listen to their clients and gain important insight into what people think of their business. Clients will share both positive and negative experiences, which will help the professional understand what is going well in their business and what they can improve upon.

For example, the professional might see multiple clients raving about one product or service and consistently complaining about another. The professional may want to find ways to expand the service that is getting great reviews and reevaluate what is receiving criticism. The professional might find that a particular employee consistently receives positive feedback for going the extra mile; find out what that employee is doing and encourage the rest of the staff to do the same.

Negative feedback is not always so obvious. Take note of posts that receive high engagement and compare them to posts that receive little-to-no engagement. High engagement is telling of what is popular among clients, while low engagement will show the converse. Finding a common denominator between high-engagement posts can help determine what clients are most interested in hearing about. The professional can then apply that information to the rest of their social media content.

MANAGING CUSTOMER SERVICE ON SOCIAL MEDIA
Putting in the Time
Managing customer service on social media requires a time commitment. The professional will need to dedicate resources to manage their accounts; someone has to post content, answer questions, and respond to any feedback. This time commitment does not mean the spa needs to have a staff member solely dedicated to social media, but they will need to have someone, or multiple people, responsible for monitoring their channels on a regular basis. Some businesses have one person that regularly monitors their social platforms, while others rotate the responsibility between multiple staff members. The amount of time spent monitoring the accounts will depend on the number of social media platforms being utilized, the size of the spa's following, and the amount of engagement from clients. The best advice is to start slowly. Pick one or two social platforms to use when getting started. The professional will be able to dedicate more time to each of them and better gauge what the overall time commitment will need to be.

Real Time Responses
One of the most important things to remember about social media is that it is immediate. When someone goes on social media, they are looking for instant gratification – a quick response to their question, an acknowledgment of their complaint, or even a "like" to their positive feedback. Businesses that are the most successful on social media acknowledge any comments as quickly as possible, even if they have to follow up with more information later.

Addressing Concerns and Negative Feedback
After a negative experience, people often turn to social media to either share their experience or look for a resolution to their issue. When the professional receives this type of communication, whether it is through a comment, review, or direct message, the best thing for them to do is acknowledge the client's concern in a timely manner. Even if the professional is not able to immediately answer the client's question or solve their problem, a quick response makes the client feel heard and goes a long way in resolving an issue positively. The professional should let the client know they are looking into the concern and will follow up with the full answer or resolution once they have it. It is also essential to thank them for their feedback, which not only shows the client that the spa wants to correct the situation, but also shows anyone else who sees the online interaction that client satisfaction is of the utmost importance.

Taking Customer Service Offline
Many customer service questions can be answered directly on the platform in which they are asked: operational hours, availability of a particular product, and whether or not a service is being offered. If the question can be answered thoroughly and concisely without additional information from the client, respond directly on the platform. Clients see the professional as the expert and are seeking their advice, but too many details can make the professional's response muddled and confusing.

However, the professional will run into issues that are better resolved in private messages or offline. These issues include anything that requires getting more information from the client, such as questions about which products they should be using to issues that would better be resolved over the phone, like a complaint about negative results from a service. When these issues come up, the professional can send the client a private message on the platform on which they reached out to them, or can ask the client for their contact information so the professional can reach out to them directly about the issue. Either way, be sure to acknowledge the action they are taking publically so others will see that they responded to the issue. For example: "Hi Katie. We are sorry to hear about your experience – that is definitely not typical. We would like to get some additional information from you so we can help resolve the issue. Look out for a private message from us. Thanks." The professional can also say, "Hi Katie. Thank you for your feedback. We'd like to reach out to you directly so we can solve your issue. We've sent you a private message asking for your e-mail address so we can contact you there. Thanks."

Engaging with Positive Feedback
Social media is not all about managing negative customer service complaints. There is plenty of positivity to go around. Clients also love to share what they love about businesses, such as awesome results from services, positive interactions with employees, and overall great experiences with the spa. Just as the professional acknowledges criticism and negative feedback, they should also acknowledge the praise they receive too. If a client leaves a comment thanking their aesthetician for their latest treatment, reply with, "Thanks for coming in! We always love to see you!" If a client shares a picture of their clear skin thanks to a series of treatments and homecare products, like the picture and leave a comment thanking them for sharing and telling them how wonderful and healthy their skin looks.

Finding Your Voice
Social media should be used as an extension of the professional's brand, be it large or small, so do not lose sight of the spa's voice. When posting or engaging with clients, channel the brand through a human voice; be relaxed, but professional. Customize responses like the client is being spoken to face-to-face. Using a familiar voice not only strengthens the professional's branding, but also helps clients feel more comfortable and loyal.

Surprise and Delight
While responding to clients on social platforms is very important, professionals also have the opportunity to give those clients who take the extra time to talk to them online something extra. This surprise will make clients feel special and encourage them to continue engaging with the professional on social media. For example, if one of the clients shares a picture on the spa's Facebook page after every chemical peel to show the professional, and all of her social media followers, her glowing results, the professional might consider giving her a free product when she comes in for her next treatment. The professional can comment on the post telling her that, as a thank you, something special is waiting for her the next time she comes in, so not only she sees that she is getting something, but others do as well, which also encourages them to post.


THE LOGISTICS: HOW TO MONITOR AND RESPONDpic-3
While the main principles of social media customer service apply to all platforms, the specific tactics of monitoring and responding vary by channel.

Facebook
There are multiple ways clients may communicate with the professional on Facebook. Clients may leave a comment or image directly on the spa's wall or they may send a private message. The professional can easily monitor both avenues directly on Facebook. When the professional is logged into their business page, they will receive a notification within the Facebook page when someone has posted directly to their wall, when they receive a message, or when someone comments on, likes, or shares one of their posts. The professional can also change their settings to add more users to the business page and receive e-mail or push notifications to the mobile phone.

Once the professional receives a notification, they can respond directly to the comment on their computer or on their mobile device within the Facebook Page Manager mobile application. To make this process easier, the professional can get push notifications to their mobile device to know immediately when someone is interacting with them on Facebook.

Instagram
On Instagram, clients may comment directly on the professional's posts, send them a direct message, or mention them in a picture they are posting. The professional can monitor comments, direct messages, and mentions of their Instagram account directly within the mobile application. Much like Facebook, the professional will receive notifications of all new activity when logged into their account. While the professional cannot post pictures from the website, Instagram does allow them to respond to comments and messages on both the computer and within the mobile application. However, Instagram will only show the professional the most recent notifications, meaning comments and mentions can get buried and lost. Be sure to scroll through the posts to check for recent comments that may have been missed. Outside platforms, such as Iconosquare, are also helpful with tracking engagements on Instagram.

Twitter
Clients may contact the professional on Twitter by responding to a tweet, sending a direct message, or mentioning the professional in a tweet they are sharing. Monitoring Twitter activity within the platform can be difficult because it moves so quickly. When someone engages with the professional directly, the professional will receive a notification in the Notifications tab. Most businesses and brands choose to use a management tool to track their Twitter activity, such as TweetDeck or HootSuite. These platforms allow the professional to not only track all of their notifications in one place, but also track keywords people might be using about their business. This tool comes in handy if someone shares a tweet that includes the name of their business without tagging the business' Twitter handle. The professional can respond to clients directly on the computer, in the mobile application, or from a management tool if they are using one. Both TweetDeck and Hootsuite also have mobile applications, so the professional can respond on their mobile device.

Engaging with clients on social media is well worth the time and commitment to build the brand's presence and connect with clients. Showing clients that the professional cares about any and all feedback makes them feel connected to the professional and the spa, and not only makes them more willing to come back, but also more likely to refer a friend.

kelley-MooreKelley Moore is the digital media manager at PCA SKIN. She has a background working both on and offline with consumer retail brands in multiple industries. With a focus on content development, consumer communication, and customer engagement, she specializes in creating connections between consumers and brands.



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By Alexandra J. Zani | January 18, 2019

A LITTLE HISTORY
Laser hair removal procedures in 2010 totaled to 936, 121, which reflected a -26.9% decrease from 2009 – most likely as a result of a flexing economy.1 It is a procedure, however, that continues to be popular.
Lasers (including the CO2 laser) were introduced in dermatology and surgery as early as the 1960s.2 The CO2 laser became more popular during the 1990s for skin resurfacing to improve wrinkles, dischromias, scars, atrophic scars, pitted acne scars and others.3 These pioneering procedures also meant longer recovery periods.

Newer generations of thermal lasers, including fractional lasers and controlled non-ablative pulsed lasers helped influence a new field of aesthetic medicine during the past 15 years. Many laser services are now considered lunchtime procedures unlike the earlier CO2 skin resurfacing procedure that required several days to weeks for recovery. Modern services include hair reduction, skin rejuvenation, pigmentation, vascular lesions (port wine stains, telangiectasia, superficial veins) and tattoo removal. Manufacturers for contemporary thermal devices for cosmetic treatments (laser, intense pulse light (IPL), and radio frequency) have perfected their machines through incorporating more contemporary smart features that support ease of calibration and use, safety and more controlled outcome of a procedure. Moreover, the passing of time during the past 20 years has allowed for additional research including a greater understanding of thermal effects on tissue, refinement of techniques, writing of peer-reviewed studies, and witnessing the transition into a medical spa environment.

EDUCATIONAL REQUIREMENTS
A growing concern involves the inconsistency of statewide variants as to who is allowed to operate a non-ablative laser, i.e., hair removal lasers in particular. Additionally, one must be mindful that lasers/IPL devices can be dangerous in the hands of an unskilled operator.
Reviewing the evolution of laser technology (including radio frequency and any device that perpetrates a thermal response in tissue) and its place in aesthetic medicine brings with it many challenges when it comes to consistent and adequate education in the use of non-ablative technology. Both medical and aesthetic personnel, each of whom will vary in education level, should be trained and certified in safe operation of these machines. Additionally, they must also work within the scope of their licensing. A few hours of manufacturer training in an office is not always adequate. Furthermore, learning laser theory without sufficient hours of hands-on practicum under the guidance of an experienced tutor again is not recommended. It takes practice to perfect the understanding of laser operation, tissue response and how to remedy any unexpected result. Moreover, this knowledge and precaution should not be limited to procedures that solely create heat shock to the skin (laser/IPL/radio frequency). Rather it should pertain to all other treatment procedures (chemical peels, microdermabrasion, ultrasound, dermal needling) that may pose a risk for tissue injury (controlled or unexpected) including interference with the normal biological functioning of the skin – acid mantle, immune cells, keratinocytes, melanocytes, nerve cells, fibroblasts, Natural Moisturizing Factors(NMF), enzyme processes and more.
An in-depth understanding in the dermal sciences should be mandated for all aesthetic professionals. Study should include skin histology, cells and systems, skin disorders and diseases, melanogenesis (pigment), angiogenesis (vascular and circulatory system), the immune response during a procedure, successful wound healing during the use of a device that creates a thermal response in the skin, or even a chemical or mechanical wound. Included in this list is the importance of understanding the procedural effects of thermal technology on all skin colors and cultural variation. Most important is to develop one's ability to fully grasp the degree of possible risks for global skin types that are becoming more prevalent within our North American society. Cultural (race) diversity includes Caucasian, non-Caucasian and mixed population groups found in many parts of the world and here. The outcome and rate of healing may vary within each category. Furthermore, product choices should be carefully studied so that we apply ingredients that are non-toxic and bio-identical to skin components.

SKIN ANALYSIS
Prior to performing any procedure, a detailed systematic pathway of skin analysis is required that encompasses the client's health history, life style profile, visual and verbal interview, and client expectations. The accuracy of this assessment is also dependent upon the education level of the practitioner who should be savvy enough to recognize indicators for potential tissue reaction and risk, healing potential and final outcome and success of a procedure. Without mastery of these underlying concepts, mistakes can be made with potential irreversible consequences.
The next section of this article will discuss an important aspect of skin histology beginning with a review of human origins and the melanogenesis story. We will travel back in time because it reveals valuable insight in supporting our decisions when performing laser/IPL treatments. Moreover, this information is relevant for ALL aesthetic services including chemical peels, enzymes, microdermabrasion and other skin-rejuvenating services.

HUMAN ORIGINS
When we first meet another person, we immediately notice the color of their skin, their hair, and other anatomical features that subtly provides indicators to their racial and geographical origin. Physical appearance (anatomical features) also influences the propensity for sexual attraction resulting in proliferation of a species. What differentiates the gradation or degree of color in human beings is based on several observations. Regardless of skin color, the purpose, function and biological requirements of cells remain consistent in all individuals no matter what their geographical location.4 What encourages body health and human survival are balanced nutrients, light and darkness, optimum immune response, healthy cell membranes and skin barrier, the ability to adapt into an environment, and healthy social structures. Cells have receptors and sensors that are responsive to external and internal stimuli that collectively become part of a greater communication network within the body. Synchronicity of ALL systems is based on genetic adaptation that leads to optimum human health and survival.5 There may be, however, some differences between race groups based on origins and genetic adaptive characteristics. This is a key observation.
The closer one originates from locations in proximity to the equator, the darker the skin with the biochemistry, including skin color, adapting accordingly. Populations originating in colder latitudes north and south of the equator are lighter in skin color.5 Anthropology studies substantiate that through a process called Natural Selection and Biodiversity, humans have a remarkable innate ability to adapt to their natural surroundings. This may be at sea level, to mountain regions, rain forest and hot desert. Body structures, height, and the amount of body fat are all adaptive mechanisms that reveal clues as to one's origin. For example, long, linear bodies tend to be correlated with hot, dry climates. Short, stocky body builds with shorter fingers and toes are found in colder, wet climates.6,7 What about individuals who tend to have larger lungs and chest cavities and whose ancestors originated at higher elevations with lower oxygen supply? At first you may ask why these differences exist. My answer to you is to explore the biological requirements of the cells and systems that promote healthy body functioning based on climatic and environmental adaptivity.
Here is another observation: It took thousands of years for humans to evolve and create features and biological responses that safeguarded survival in their native location. Genetic adaptations occur due to phenomena called environmental stresses(or evolutionary pressure) that include temperature, humidity, various altitudes, bacterial and viral infection, air quality, and dietary imbalance.7 When these conditions become persistent over several generations, survival requires a biological evolution for genetic adaptation.7 A good example is when populations lived during times of disease. They began to acquire genetic traits that helped them build immunity to those microorganisms. Genetic traits, as a result, are passed to subsequent generations. It also provides clues as to why individuals may experience health challenges including various skin conditions. For the price of a plane ticket, modern humans can relocate in a day to another part of the world. It certainly could promote a bit of biological and psychological havoc!
Considering that it took humans 25,000 to 50,000 years of adaptation, what biological and anatomical changes occurred when humans relocated from the core of Africa into northern or southern latitudes? Movement into these colder regions eventually caused darker skin to lighten proportionally to the distance to which they migrated. This resulted in a gradation (or range) of skin colors.9 What is the underlying reason for color adaptation in humans? We will move on to discuss melanin and body health.

MELANOCYTES – A Dendritic UV Filter System
There is a strong correlation between UV radiation and the biological requirements for health, specifically for vitamin D synthesis. Melanocyte function is primarily under genetic and hormonal controls that continuously strive to keep our natural level of skin color in check in order to regulate UV absorption. Both light and dark skin have variable sized melanin particles. The density and size of pigment particles become greater in darker skin types. An exception is with red heads that possess what is known as red gene MC1R factor resulting in fair skin, freckles, and red hair. Unlike their neighbors, the keratinocytes, melanocytes are slow cycling and long lived. After the age of 16 the regeneration cycle of melanocytes become limited. Beginning in our 30s and 40s the density of active melanocytes is reduced by 10 to 20 percent every ten years.10, 11
One in 10 cells in the basal area are melanocytes and serve to protect germinating nuclei of epidermal cells. They manufacture and package pigment granules (melanosomes) that are injected via dendrites into the keratinocytes. They are considered a photoprotective filter that becomes part of the natural skin barrier. These pigment cells reduce and control the penetration of all wavelengths of light to dermal tissues.10 This is a key function of the melanocyte and should not be overlooked. Melanin function includes not only UV filtering but also acts as a free radical scavenger due to its bipolymer complex structures as well as being a cation trap for toxic metals.8 We also have melanin receptors in the cones of our eyes; however, we will focus on the skin in this article.
It is well understood that over-absorption of UV radiation can result in cell destruction and suppression of thermoregulation and other biological processes.9 A controlled amount of UVB must, however, enter the skin cell receptors in order for the body to catalyze vitamin D, a group of fat-soluble secosteroids. Approximately 90 percent is this vitamin is normally synthesized in the basal and spinosum layers of the skin. The other 10 percent can come from our nutrition (fatty fish, egg yolks).

  • Vitamin D3 (cholecalciferol) is required for the intestines to absorb calcium and phosphorus from food for bone growth and repair as well as regulate heart rhythm. Rickets is a prime example due to calcium deficiency.
  • Vitamin D is required for our immune system as well as helps control inflammation and influences gene regulation, differentiation, and apoptosis of cells. 8
  • Vitamin D deficiencies during pregnancy can result in pelvic deformities in women preventing normal delivery of babies.11
  • The activity of melanocytes in controlling and filtering is important to protecting UV photolysis (light-stimulated chemical decomposition) of folic acid (foliate, a B vitamin). Deficiencies in this nutrient can lead to anemia and creates risk for poor fetal development, resulting in miscarriage and poor reproductive success. 8

The control and rate of melanin production is essential for Vitamin D synthesis. The duration of UVB exposure must be sufficient to catalyze provitamin D3. What is important, however, that this regulation is genetically controlled through the adaptive traits inherited from our ancestors and region of origin. There are reasons for gradation of color based on these genetic traits. An increase of melanin in the skin increases the length of exposure to UV that is required for synthesis of the provitamin D3. For example, the formation of provitamin D3 takes more than five times as long in a very dark skin (Type VI) versus a light skin (Type III).8 Lighter skin types who originate further away from the equator require variable exposure times depending upon their location.

WHEN THINGS GO WRONG
The correct choice of wavelength, correct treatment settings, and technique in hair reduction or another aesthetic laser treatment are indeed important considerations. Whether in laser hair reduction or reducing the appearance of pigment on the skin, and skin rejuvenation, the propensity for adverse reactions increases with darker skin types. Moreover, when there is racial blending, this becomes a red flag for hidden potential risks. Do not be fooled by visual observation. A skin may appear dark but possess an ability to burn (and/or react) due to mixed ancestor traits including undisclosed health issues. Lighter skin types also become susceptible to cellular oxidation and damage when they are living in an area not native to their origins that also increases their risk for cancer. A key is to assess whether a condition is actually treatable. Is the client a good candidate for the service?
And finally, when considering treatment for correcting melasma and other pigmentation disorders one must determine the significance of the initial underlying causes. Do you understand the concepts of the melanogenesis story and the biological implications when melanocytes are damaged, including the mitochondria and possible shortening of the dendrites from oxidative stress, damage, and aging? Is there damage to the keratinocytes? Moreover, considering that pigment is deposited into the cells at the spinosum layer in the newly formed keratinocytes, what if there is a weak spinosum layer or the presence of an imbalanced enzyme or lack of a key chemical substance during this transitional process? Moving further into the dermis structures, the degradation of collagen and elastin, and ground substance (caused from numerous factors including aging and oxidative stress) poses another clue into a larger picture.

FAST FORWARD – 21st Century
How is all of this information relevant to our skin care practice or laser center? It is not enough to look at someone and visually determine their Fitzpatrick type or treatment outcome. Rather there is a subtler underlying story when it comes to successful result of any treatment.

Sources:

  1. Cosmetic Surgery National Data Bank Statistics, 2010 Report. (Click Here to Retrieve)
  2. Laser hair removal history and current issues. (Click Here to Retrieve)
  3. Sandhu, N., Elston, D. (2010) Cutaneous Laser Resurfacing, Carbon Dioxide. Medscape Reference. (Click Here to Retrieve)
  4. Rawlings, A.V. (2005) Ethnic Skin Types: Are there Differences in Skin Structure and Function? Presented as a keynote lecture at the IFSCC International Conference, Florence, Italy. (Click Here to Retrieve)
  5. Jablonski, N. (2006) Skin: A Natural History. University of California Press. Berkley, California
  6. Black History: Modern scientific explanation of human biological variation – Race. (Click Here to Retrieve)
  7. O'Neil, D. (2011) Human Biological Adaptability. An introduction to Human Responses to Common Environmental Stresses. Behavioral Sciences Dept. Palomar College, San Marcos, California. (Click Here to Retrieve)
  8. Jablonski, N., Chaplin, G. (2000) The evolution of human skin coloration. Journal of Human Evolution; 39, 57-106. (Click Here to Retrieve)
  9. Barrett-Hill, F. (2005) Advanced Skin Analysis. Virtual Beauty, New Zealand.
  10. Alam, M. Ashish, B. et al (2004) Cosmetic Dermatology for Skin of Color. McGraw-Hill Medical, NY. P1-8
  11. Holick, M.F. (1995). Environmental factors that influence the cutaneous production of vitamin D 1-3. Am J ClinNutr 1995:61 (supple): 638S


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By | January 18, 2019

A LITTLE HISTORY
Laser hair removal procedures in 2010 totaled to 936, 121, which reflected a -26.9% decrease from 2009 – most likely as a result of a flexing economy.1 It is a procedure, however, that continues to be popular.
Lasers (including the CO2 laser) were introduced in dermatology and surgery as early as the 1960s.2 The CO2 laser became more popular during the 1990s for skin resurfacing to improve wrinkles, dischromias, scars, atrophic scars, pitted acne scars and others.3 These pioneering procedures also meant longer recovery periods.
Newer generations of thermal lasers, including fractional lasers and controlled non-ablative pulsed lasers helped influence a new field of aesthetic medicine during the past 15 years. Many laser services are now considered lunchtime procedures unlike the earlier CO2 skin resurfacing procedure that required several days to weeks for recovery. Modern services include hair reduction, skin rejuvenation, pigmentation, vascular lesions (port wine stains, telangiectasia, superficial veins) and tattoo removal. Manufacturers for contemporary thermal devices for cosmetic treatments (laser, intense pulse light (IPL), and radio frequency) have perfected their machines through incorporating more contemporary smart features that support ease of calibration and use, safety and more controlled outcome of a procedure. Moreover, the passing of time during the past 20 years has allowed for additional research including a greater understanding of thermal effects on tissue, refinement of techniques, writing of peer-reviewed studies, and witnessing the transition into a medical spa environment.

EDUCATIONAL REQUIREMENTS
A growing concern involves the inconsistency of statewide variants as to who is allowed to operate a non-ablative laser, i.e., hair removal lasers in particular. Additionally, one must be mindful that lasers/IPL devices can be dangerous in the hands of an unskilled operator.
Reviewing the evolution of laser technology (including radio frequency and any device that perpetrates a thermal response in tissue) and its place in aesthetic medicine brings with it many challenges when it comes to consistent and adequate education in the use of non-ablative technology. Both medical and aesthetic personnel, each of whom will vary in education level, should be trained and certified in safe operation of these machines. Additionally, they must also work within the scope of their licensing. A few hours of manufacturer training in an office is not always adequate. Furthermore, learning laser theory without sufficient hours of hands-on practicum under the guidance of an experienced tutor again is not recommended. It takes practice to perfect the understanding of laser operation, tissue response and how to remedy any unexpected result. Moreover, this knowledge and precaution should not be limited to procedures that solely create heat shock to the skin (laser/IPL/radio frequency). Rather it should pertain to all other treatment procedures (chemical peels, microdermabrasion, ultrasound, dermal needling) that may pose a risk for tissue injury (controlled or unexpected) including interference with the normal biological functioning of the skin – acid mantle, immune cells, keratinocytes, melanocytes, nerve cells, fibroblasts, Natural Moisturizing Factors (NMF), enzyme processes and more.
An in-depth understanding in the dermal sciences should be mandated for all aesthetic professionals. Study should include skin histology, cells and systems, skin disorders and diseases, melanogenesis (pigment), angiogenesis (vascular and circulatory system), the immune response during a procedure, successful wound healing during the use of a device that creates a thermal response in the skin, or even a chemical or mechanical wound. Included in this list is the importance of understanding the procedural effects of thermal technology on all skin colors and cultural variation. Most important is to develop one’s ability to fully grasp the degree of possible risks for global skin types that are becoming more prevalent within our North American society. Cultural (race) diversity includes Caucasian, non-Caucasian and mixed population groups found in many parts of the world and here. The outcome and rate of healing may vary within each category. Furthermore, product choices should be carefully studied so that we apply ingredients that are non-toxic and bio-identical to skin components.

SKIN ANALYSIS
Prior to performing any procedure, a detailed systematic pathway of skin analysis is required that encompasses the client’s health history, life style profile, visual and verbal interview, and client expectations. The accuracy of this assessment is also dependent upon the education level of the practitioner who should be savvy enough to recognize indicators for potential tissue reaction and risk, healing potential and final outcome and success of a procedure. Without mastery of these underlying concepts, mistakes can be made with potential irreversible consequences.
The next section of this article will discuss an important aspect of skin histology beginning with a review of human origins and the melanogenesis story. We will travel back in time because it reveals valuable insight in supporting our decisions when performing laser/IPL treatments. Moreover, this information is relevant for ALL aesthetic services including chemical peels, enzymes, microdermabrasion and other skin-rejuvenating services.

HUMAN ORIGINS
When we first meet another person, we immediately notice the color of their skin, their hair, and other anatomical features that subtly provides indicators to their racial and geographical origin. Physical appearance (anatomical features) also influences the propensity for sexual attraction resulting in proliferation of a species. What differentiates the gradation or degree of color in human beings is based on several observations. Regardless of skin color, the purpose, function and biological requirements of cells remain consistent in all individuals no matter what their geographical location.4 What encourages body health and human survival are balanced nutrients, light and darkness, optimum immune response, healthy cell membranes and skin barrier, the ability to adapt into an environment, and healthy social structures. Cells have receptors and sensors that are responsive to external and internal stimuli that collectively become part of a greater communication network within the body. Synchronicity of ALL systems is based on genetic adaptation that leads to optimum human health and survival.5 There may be, however, some differences between race groups based on origins and genetic adaptive characteristics. This is a key observation.
The closer one originates from locations in proximity to the equator, the darker the skin with the biochemistry, including skin color, adapting accordingly. Populations originating in colder latitudes north and south of the equator are lighter in skin color.5 Anthropology studies substantiate that through a process called Natural Selection and Biodiversity, humans have a remarkable innate ability to adapt to their natural surroundings. This may be at sea level, to mountain regions, rain forest and hot desert. Body structures, height, and the amount of body fat are all adaptive mechanisms that reveal clues as to one’s origin. For example, long, linear bodies tend to be correlated with hot, dry climates. Short, stocky body builds with shorter fingers and toes are found in colder, wet climates.6,7 What about individuals who tend to have larger lungs and chest cavities and whose ancestors originated at higher elevations with lower oxygen supply? At first you may ask why these differences exist. My answer to you is to explore the biological requirements of the cells and systems that promote healthy body functioning based on climatic and environmental adaptivity.
Here is another observation: It took thousands of years for humans to evolve and create features and biological responses that safeguarded survival in their native location. Genetic adaptations occur due to phenomena called environmental stresses (or evolutionary pressure) that include temperature, humidity, various altitudes, bacterial and viral infection, air quality, and dietary imbalance.7 When these conditions become persistent over several generations, survival requires a biological evolution for genetic adaptation.7 A good example is when populations lived during times of disease. They began to acquire genetic traits that helped them build immunity to those microorganisms. Genetic traits, as a result, are passed to subsequent generations. It also provides clues as to why individuals may experience health challenges including various skin conditions. For the price of a plane ticket, modern humans can relocate in a day to another part of the world. It certainly could promote a bit of biological and psychological havoc!
Considering that it took humans 25,000 to 50,000 years of adaptation, what biological and anatomical changes occurred when humans relocated from the core of Africa into northern or southern latitudes? Movement into these colder regions eventually caused darker skin to lighten proportionally to the distance to which they migrated. This resulted in a gradation (or range) of skin colors.9 What is the underlying reason for color adaptation in humans? We will move on to discuss melanin and body health.

MELANOCYTES – A Dendritic UV Filter System
There is a strong correlation between UV radiation and the biological requirements for health, specifically for vitamin D synthesis. Melanocyte function is primarily under genetic and hormonal controls that continuously strive to keep our natural level of skin color in check in order to regulate UV absorption. Both light and dark skin have variable sized melanin particles. The density and size of pigment particles become greater in darker skin types. An exception is with red heads that possess what is known as red gene MC1R factor resulting in fair skin, freckles, and red hair. Unlike their neighbors, the keratinocytes, melanocytes are slow cycling and long lived. After the age of 16 the regeneration cycle of melanocytes become limited. Beginning in our 30s and 40s the density of active melanocytes is reduced by 10 to 20 percent every ten years.10, 11
One in 10 cells in the basal area are melanocytes and serve to protect germinating nuclei of epidermal cells. They manufacture and package pigment granules (melanosomes) that are injected via dendrites into the keratinocytes. They are considered a photoprotective filter that becomes part of the natural skin barrier. These pigment cells reduce and control the penetration of all wavelengths of light to dermal tissues.10 This is a key function of the melanocyte and should not be overlooked. Melanin function includes not only UV filtering but also acts as a free radical scavenger due to its bipolymer complex structures as well as being a cation trap for toxic metals.8 We also have melanin receptors in the cones of our eyes; however, we will focus on the skin in this article.
It is well understood that over-absorption of UV radiation can result in cell destruction and suppression of thermoregulation and other biological processes. 9 A controlled amount of UVB must, however, enter the skin cell receptors in order for the body to catalyze vitamin D, a group of fat-soluble secosteroids. Approximately 90 percent is this vitamin is normally synthesized in the basal and spinosum layers of the skin. The other 10 percent can come from our nutrition (fatty fish, egg yolks).

  • Vitamin D3 (cholecalciferol) is required for the intestines to absorb calcium and phosphorus from food for bone growth and repair as well as regulate heart rhythm. Rickets is a prime example due to calcium deficiency.
  • Vitamin D is required for our immune system as well as helps control inflammation and influences gene regulation, differentiation, and apoptosis of cells. 8
  • Vitamin D deficiencies during pregnancy can result in pelvic deformities in women preventing normal delivery of babies.11
  • The activity of melanocytes in controlling and filtering is important to protecting UV photolysis (light-stimulated chemical decomposition) of folic acid (foliate, a B vitamin). Deficiencies in this nutrient can lead to anemia and creates risk for poor fetal development, resulting in miscarriage and poor reproductive success. 8

The control and rate of melanin production is essential for Vitamin D synthesis. The duration of UVB exposure must be sufficient to catalyze provitamin D3.What is important, however, that this regulation is genetically controlled through the adaptive traits inherited from our ancestors and region of origin. There are reasons for gradation of color based on these genetic traits. An increase of melanin in the skin increases the length of exposure to UV that is required for synthesis of the provitamin D3. For example, the formation of provitamin D3 takes more than five times as long in a very dark skin (Type VI) versus a light skin (Type III).8 Lighter skin types who originate further away from the equator require variable exposure times depending upon their location.

WHEN THINGS GO WRONG
The correct choice of wavelength, correct treatment settings, and technique in hair reduction or another aesthetic laser treatment are indeed important considerations. Whether in laser hair reduction or reducing the appearance of pigment on the skin, and skin rejuvenation, the propensity for adverse reactions increases with darker skin types. Moreover, when there is racial blending, this becomes a red flag for hidden potential risks. Do not be fooled by visual observation. A skin may appear dark but possess an ability to burn (and/or react) due to mixed ancestor traits including undisclosed health issues. Lighter skin types also become susceptible to cellular oxidation and damage when they are living in an area not native to their origins that also increases their risk for cancer. A key is to assess whether a condition is actually treatable. Is the client a good candidate for the service?
And finally, when considering treatment for correcting melasma and other pigmentation disorders one must determine the significance of the initial underlying causes. Do you understand the concepts of the melanogenesis story and the biological implications when melanocytes are damaged, including the mitochondria and possible shortening of the dendrites from oxidative stress, damage, and aging? Is there damage to the keratinocytes? Moreover, considering that pigment is deposited into the cells at the spinosum layer in the newly formed keratinocytes, what if there is a weak spinosum layer or the presence of an imbalanced enzyme or lack of a key chemical substance during this transitional process? Moving further into the dermis structures, the degradation of collagen and elastin, and ground substance (caused from numerous factors including aging and oxidative stress) poses another clue into a larger picture.

FAST FORWARD – 21st Century
How is all of this information relevant to our skin care practice or laser center? It is not enough to look at someone and visually determine their Fitzpatrick type or treatment outcome. Rather there is a subtler underlying story when it comes to successful result of any treatment.

Sources:
1 Cosmetic Surgery National Data Bank Statistics, 2010 Report. Retrieved from http://www.surgery.org/sites/default/files/Stats2010_1.pdf
2 Laser hair removal history and current issues. Retrieved from http://www.hairfacts.com/methods/laser/laser-hair-removal-history-and-current-issues/
3 Sandhu, N., Elston, D. (2010) Cutaneous Laser Resurfacing, Carbon Dioxide. Medscape Reference. Retrieved from http://emedicine.medscape.com/article/1120283-overview#aw2aab6b4
4 Rawlings, A.V. (2005) Ethnic Skin Types: Are there Differences in Skin Structure and Function? Presented as a keynote lecture at the IFSCC International Conference, Florence, Italy. Retrieved from http://wwww.pharmaclinix.com/ifscc_extract.pdf
5 Jablonski, N. (2006) Skin: A Natural History. University of California Press. Berkley, California
6 Black History: Modern scientific explanation of human biological variation – Race. Retrieved from http://www.britannica.com/blackhistory/article-234690
7 O’Neil, D. (2011) Human Biological Adaptability. An introduction to Human Responses to Common Environmental Stresses. Behavioral Sciences Dept. Palomar College, San Marcos, California. Retrieved from http://anthro.paomar.educ/adap/adapt_4htm
8 Jablonski, N., Chaplin, G. (2000) The evolution of human skin coloration. Journal of Human Evolution; 39, 57-106. Retrieved from http://www.bgsu.edu/departments/chem/faculty/leontis/chem447/PDF_files/Jablonski_skin_color_2000.pdf
9 Barrett-Hill, F. (2005) Advanced Skin Analysis. Virtual Beauty, New Zealand.
10 Alam, M. Ashish, B. et al (2004) Cosmetic Dermatology for Skin of Color. McGraw-Hill Medical, NY. P1-8
11 Holick, M.F. (1995). Environmental factors that influence the cutaneous production of vitamin D 1-3. Am J ClinNutr 1995:61 (supple): 638S



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By | January 18, 2019

Hydrotherapy, derived from the Greek words hydro and therapeia, meaning water and healing, is the application of water, either internally or externally, for the treatment of physical or psychological dysfunction. Bathing in water has been considered healing since the beginning of recorded time and across many cultures, from Hippocrates in the fourth and fifth centuries B.C., who used hot and cold water to treat a variety of diseases, to the Romans at the beginning of the first century A.D., who constructed therapeutic baths across their empire, to the Japanese, who have used ritual baths from ancient times to the modern day.

The therapeutic use of water gained particular popularity in Europe in the late 19th century, with the development of health spas in areas of natural springs such as Baden-Baden and Bad Ragaz, and shortly thereafter in the United States in similar areas of natural hot springs (Arkansas, California, New York, and Virginia). Although hydrotherapy has been shown to have wide-ranging therapeutic effects and benefits, its use today continues to be limited, largely due to the expenses associated with establishing and maintaining a safe hydrotherapy environment.

Main1Properties of Water
Water has a number of unique physical properties that include a relatively high specific heat and thermal conductivity and the ability to provide buoyancy, resistance, and hydrostatic pressure to the body.

Specific Heat and Thermal Conductivity
Water can transfer heat by conduction and convection and can therefore be used as a superficial heating or cooling agent. It is particularly effective for this application because it has a high specific heat and thermal conductivity. During hydrotherapy, heat is transferred from warm water to the body by placing the limb in a container filled with warm water. Heat may also be transferred from the body to cooler water by immersing a limb in a container filled with cold water.

Water Bath Therapies
Baths are given as: arm bath, foot bath, or full bath. These baths may be taken cold (32 to 65 degrees Fahrenheit), cool (66 to 71 degrees Fahrenheit), lukewarm (72 to 82 degrees Fahrenheit), intermediate (83 to 95 degrees Fahrenheit), warm (96 to 100 degrees Fahrenheit), or hot (101 to 105 degrees Fahrenheit). Warm baths may be taken with herbal essential bath oil additives such as balm mint, chamomile, eucalyptus, lavender, thyme, and pine needle.

Neutral Bath
The neutral bath, sometimes called the continuous bath, is a non-thermic hydrotherapy of great value. It is a full-body immersion in water, approximately 92 to 97 degrees Fahrenheit.
Begin by filling a full-size bathtub with water of neutral temperature. Make the client comfortable with a pillow or rolled towel for their head and adjust the water to temperature neutral to the client. Clients should feel somewhere between comfortably warm and neither warm nor cold; this is a better guide than the thermometer, although the actual temperature should be monitored, in any case. Cover any exposed parts with towels, or cover whole bathtub with sheet. The lighting in the treatment room should be dim. Add water to the bath, as necessary, to maintain neutral temperature. The bath should be between 15 minutes to one hour for insomnia. Cool the water a few degrees at the end of the treatment and assist the client out of the bathtub. The client should dry quickly but gently without friction, which would be too stimulating for a calmative treatment. The client should rest for half an hour.
This treatment works well for clients who are experiencing insomnia, nervous exhaustion, anxiety, and depression. Withhold this treatment from clients who are experiencing fever, acute hypertension, diabetes, chronic pain, toxemia or pregnancy, peripheral edema, eczema, or other skin conditions aggravated by water.

Main2Hot Bath
With the hot bath treatment, the whole body is immersed in water except for the client’s head. Excluding the head, the body cannot control its temperature by sweating, but the body is more heated since there is direct contact with the water and water has the property to carry heat and conducts it very well. To begin, fill the bathtub two-thirds full of hot water, approximately 104 degrees Fahrenheit and assist the client into the bathtub. Cover any exposed body parts with a towel or cover the bathtub with a sheet or light blanket. Keep the head cool with a cold compress. Check the client’s pulse regularly and do not let it exceed 80 beats per minute.
After assisting the client out of the bathtub, follow with an alcohol rub or a cool sponge bath. The client should dry thoroughly and be kept warm. They should rest for one hour after the treatment.
This treatment is great for clients who are experiencing poor circulation, pain, muscle stiffness, general fatigue, and congestion of internal organs. Withhold this treatment from clients who are experiencing heart disease, diabetes, diseases of malignant origin, vascular disorders, or high blood pressure. Also understand that frail clients will not tolerate hot baths well. If dizziness or faintness develops, stop the treatment at once. It is also wise to never leave the client alone.

Whirlpool Bath
A whirlpool bath combines a thermal stimulus of the water with further mechanical stimuli. One way this occurs is with the aid of a rotating propeller, which moves the water. In addition, a jet of warm air is injected into the water through a small nozzle. Depending on the size, the whirlpool bath can be used either as a partial bath for the lower legs or arms, or as a full bath for the entire body. The whirlpool bath should not be compared to the underwater massage, as the mechanical component is weaker. Whirlpool baths are used primarily after injuries and for clients with rheumatic disabilities, including rheumatic muscle and joint disorders, as well as for relaxing after practice and competition.
One of the outstanding therapeutic uses of the whirlpool bath is to relieve muscle soreness and fatigue. This is the reason many athletes and dancers purchase portable whirlpools for their bath or go swimming in a pool with such whirlpool action.
Whirlpool baths are helpful in anti-pain therapy. Begin the whirlpool bath at a neutral temperature and raise to the tolerance of the client. A whirlpool bath can vary from 15 to 45 minutes in duration, depending on the purpose for which it is being used. If the bath will be followed with a massage, wrap the client’s entire body to keep it completely warm.
Prepare the client for a massage by first providing a stimulating and relaxing whirlpool bath. Clients who are sensitive to very hot water should not use a whirlpool bath. This includes all clients with diabetes, varicose veins, advanced arteriosclerosis, or any advanced vascular limb problem.
Whirlpool therapy can help with circulation problems and is a well-known aid in relieving chronic pain and the phantom pain that occurs after amputations. Whirlpool therapy will help relieve muscle soreness and body fatigue, especially after vigorous athletic activity. It will also help heal skin sores and infected wounds, reduce the swelling of chronic edema (tissue swelling), help reduce the pain of minor frostbite, ease scar tissue from burns, and help with weak and painful feet.

Arm Bath – Alternative Temperature
This treatment will increase blood circulation for the client. Have the client seated comfortably for this treatment. Fill one arm bath bucket with warm water, approximately 96 to 100 degrees Fahrenheit. Fill another arm bath bucket with cold water, approximately 65 degrees Fahrenheit. Dip both arms in the warm bath bucket, up to the middle of the upper arm. Repeat the procedure in the cold water. The duration of this treatment should be as follows: five minutes warm water, 10 seconds cold water, five minutes warm water, 10 seconds cold water. Afterwards, wipe off the client’s arms with your hands. Do not towel dry. They should exercise their arms until warm. One hour of rest is recommended following this treatment.
Herbal bath additives can be included only in the warm water. Use herbs such as balm mint, chamomile, lavender, meadow flower, pine needle, or rosemary.
This treatment is great for clients who are experiencing blood circulation problems, high blood pressure, or bronchitis. Withhold this treatment from clients who are experiencing angina pectoris and heart ailments.Main3

Foot Bath – Alternative Temperature
This treatment will increase the body’s heat regulatory system, improve blood circulation, and stabilize the nervous system. To begin, fill one foot bath bucket with warm water, approximately 97 to 100 degrees Fahrenheit, and a second one with cold water (as cold as possible). Put the client’s feet in the warm water. Repeat the procedure in the cold water. The duration of this treatment should be as follows: five minutes warm water, 10 to 15 seconds cold water, five minutes warm water, and 10 to 15 seconds cold water. Wipe the client’s feet with your hands. Do not towel dry. They should exercise their legs until warm. One hour of rest is recommended following this treatment.
Herbal bath additives can be included in only the warm water. Use herbs such as balm mint, chamomile, lavender, alpine meadow flower, pine needle, or rosemary.
This treatment is great for clients who are experiencing chronic cold feet, low blood pressure, or insomnia. Withhold this treatment from clients who are experiencing varicose veins.

Mineral, Herbal and Essential Oil Baths
There are many herb and pharmaceutical substances that can be added to baths to produce special effects. Water by itself has a remarkable, almost magic ability to alter the body’s state. Depending on the specific need, water can decrease or increase muscle tone, reduce pain, or generate energy. The addition of certain herbal and pharmaceutical substances to the water is a twin present to the body. Some herbs soothe while others sedate or stimulate or soften the skin. Most important is the ability of some substances to hasten perspiration and stimulate the release of stored toxins from within the body. This ability can help overcome many acute attacks and improve a chronic condition.

Fango-Mud Salicyl Powder Bath
This bath is the ultimate and favorite fragrant mud bath in European spas. The analgesic properties of the volcanic ash powder extract (fango-mud) mixed with salicyl and pine needle essential oils help to alleviate aches and pains of rheumatism in muscles and joints. The bath stimulates circulation, replaces minerals, and gently exfoliates the skin. It is recommended for use three times per week for at least four weeks in order to experience relief from sciatica, neuritis, degenerative non-inflammatory joint arthrosis, and lumbago.

Main4

Milk-Whey Powder Bath
What is whey? Whey is composed of all milks. Liquid cow’s milk has about 6.25 percent protein, and of that protein, 80 percent is whey. Traditionally, the term whey protein describes those milk proteins that remain after the cheese making process uses up the casein molecules. In bygone days, whey was fed to young livestock on the farm for nutritional values.
Whey is a complete protein containing all essential and non-essential amino acids found in nature. History reveals ancient wisdom of whey’s health and beauty powers. Hippocrates, the Greek, and then the Italian promoted the health and beauty benefits of whey. It has become Europe’s foremost skin care bath product.
The milk whey bath is particularly useful for aging and dry skin, neurodermatitis, psoriasis, acne, eczema, baby rash, fungus and many other skin ailments. The milk whey bath has a true moisturizing effect and is naturally cleansing. Bathing in milk whey helps sunburned skin and returns its smoothness. It is recommended not to use soap or shower after the bath, but to envelope into a robe and rest, allowing the protein to bond with the skin.

Mud Natrium Powder Bath
The fango-mud natrium powder bath used in spas worldwide is a mineral-rich, volcanic ash extract. This ancient beauty ritual is effective for removing impurities and smoothing the texture of the skin so it can readily absorb moisture and minerals.
Fango treatments relax tired muscles, detoxify, and revitalize the body. Fango-mud natrium powder is biologically pure and bacteria free, unscented, and fully dissolves in bath water. It will not stain the bathtub or the body.

Seaweed Powder Bath
Seaweed baths stimulate blood circulation, help eliminate toxins, aid in slimming and toning the skin, and give the body all the mineral salts and trace elements that it needs to maintain the correct balance of cells.
The deep frozen and dried seaweed product (lyophilisation) ensures the conservation of the product’s natural qualities in a way no other method can. It conserves mineral salts, vitamins, enzymes, and aroma.

Main5Herbal Essential Oil Baths
Herbal essential oil baths like lavender, chamomile, pine needle, thyme, balm mint, valerian, eucalyptus, and rosemary are highly concentrated and contain vitamins, hormones, antibiotic, and antiseptics. In a warm bath, the oils are absorbed through the skin, inducing deep relaxation that reduces stress, tension, and muscle aches.

Bicarbonated Bath
A bicarbonated mineral pearl bath is great for stress release and minor pain relief that happens when this effervescent salt is added to 86 to 98 degrees Fahrenheitbathwater.
Bicarbonated baths alleviate mild forms of dermatological high blood pressure, vegotonic and respiratory conditions, muscle fatigue, and efficiently detoxify the skin.

 

Oxygen Bath
The oxygen-activated bath salt develops smooth pearl bubbles across the skin and soothes the inside releasing tension, increasing physical vitality, regenerating the nervous and metabolic system, and improving blood circulation in arms and legs.

There are many hydrotherapy treatments that have a wide range of therapeutic benefits. Bathing in water is a natural way of healing. With all of the various types of bath therapies available, there is a way to treat every client’s needs.


Reinhard-BergelReinhard R. Bergel, M.D. has owned and operated a health spa and physical rehabilitation center in San Francisco, Calif. He is renowned for his holistic and creative abilities in physical rehabilitation, health resort, and spa therapy services. Dr. Bergel founded the International S.p.a.Therapy Training Institute in 1986. In addition to providing comprehensive education and training to individuals who desire to focus their careers in the area of spa therapy, he has established H-e-a-t. Inc (Health-equipment-accessories-training. Inc), a consultation service for spa therapy development, facility staff training, and administration. He also co-published the Spa Encyclopedia.



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By Amra | January 18, 2019

Women have reigned in the skin care industry as the prominent, key consumers of products for centuries. Product lines based products off the female sector’s desires and needs, creating a plethora of stock keeping units (SKUs) to stock on shelves in stores. In the past, men’s products only consisted of a few SKUs, mainly a shaving cream and an after shave, taking up a tiny residency near the astronomical moisturizers, cleansers, and various other female-oriented products.

Growth in Men’s Skin Care
According to The NPD Group, Inc., a global information company, men’s grooming in 2013 reported to show positive signs in warranting more interest in their skin. Men’s Grooming Report NPD reported that men’s products grew seven percent in 2012 and continues to grow at a 12 to 14 percent rate, with shaving making up to 40 percent of the men’s grooming market. It also reported that men are consistently more optimistic about finances, are easier to sell and upsell than women, and are loyal to their products and routine.
In the 21st century, men are becoming more aware of their skin and less inhibited in taking care of it. Because they do not articulate to others in the same way as women, it is harder for them to recognize their skin needs. All they know is that when they look in the mirror every time they shave, their skin is changing and they would like to keep it from doing so. Unfortunately, they do not always know how. At this point, products and professionals become their educators.
Men do not talk about the latest skin care trends while hanging out with other men; it is not a normal choice of topic. It is usually a woman or a skin care professional who points out that a certain product would be good for them. In fact, according to the same report from 2013, 50 percent of women purchase products for men and it is women who are instrumental in helping them make skin care decisions.

Fast Results
Men like to be given a solution for their skin’s problem. If they look in the mirror and see that they are getting more fine lines around their eyes, they want something that they can put on them that will help. If they look in the mirror and see that their skin is red in certain areas, they want to know what can be put on to reduce the redness. There is no grey area when it comes to men and their skin. They want to treat what they see. Preventive skin care does not mean much to them because the less they have to do with their skin’s needs, the better. They are not searching for a miracle cream that keeps them from aging over time because they are not seeing future skin problems. They want the “now” treatment.

Packaging
Men are very sensitive about their masculinity. Therefore, purchasing a product from a company that is packaged in shades of pink and yellow it does not appear “manly.” No matter how wonderful the product and how beneficial it would be, the packaging detours the sale. Men feel unmasculine when they reach for a moisturizer with white, pretty peonies on the bottle. They do not even use the word ‘moisturizer’ – that word alone is feminine. Men prefer the words ‘cream’ or ‘lotion.’
Men’s products need to be seen as manly. The product needs to make a bold and masculine statement. Men want to feel like whatever is in the package has gusto and a loud roar. The packaging has to stand out as a proud, in-charge lion in the jungle. If they do try a product that questions their masculinity and it does not show fast results, they will go back to their old skin regimen and not purchase skin products again for some time. Why would they spend a lot of money on a product that did not do anything different from their usual routine? They already have two perfectly good products, usually a body wash and lotion, that they have been using for years.

Scents
When they feel that their masculinity is not being stripped by packaging, another obstacle they have to surpass is scent. Scent is extremely important; he wants to smell like cologne, not like perfume, so more earth-tone scents such as woods and musk are ideal. Besides packaging that tends to appeal more to women, men also are very discouraged from purchasing a product that reminds them of their mother’s, aunt’s, or grandmother’s scent. There is nothing more emasculating than rubbing the smell of sweet rose, which reminds them of all the unbearable hugs they received as a child by the women in their life, all over their face. They would rather smell of elk urine than gardenia and marigold. Men cannot have their product being pumped out of a bottle with the scent of a Japanese cherry blossom flower; the product will either be thrown into the trash or given to a female because men usually do not return products.

Specific Skin Care Needs For Men
Skin care specialists and women are the main reason that men branch out of their habitual skin care standards and try a new product. While men have been using shaving products for years, they are now starting to purchase eye creams and targeted products for specific skin concerns. Men’s products are becoming part of the norm. It is no longer considered out of the ordinary to use a SPF cream on the skin or an eye cream to combat fine lines and puffiness around the eyes. Men are learning that they can take care of their skin with more than two products. They are also learning that their skin is not the same as women. Because their skin is different, it should be treated differently.
Men produce more testosterone than women, making their skin very different from women’s. Testosterone produces more oily skin among men and causes their skin to become thinner with age, whereas the estrogen in women helps keep their skin from thinning. Men also have thicker skin. In addition to testosterone-caused differences, men have smaller sebaceous glands than women, thus slowing down the rate of their skin’s absorption. It is extremely important that men recognize these differences and understand that men’s products are formulated specifically for their skin. The good old stand-by of a soap bar and lotion will not favor them in the long haul.

Women’s products have been a great precursor for men’s products. Throughout centuries, women’s products have been formulated and reformulated, paving the pathway for researchers and developers to tweak formulations to target males and treat their skin with care and attention. Men’s products are increasing in SKUs and, although they will never quantify to the exponential growth of women’s products, they are being purchased and sought out. Men need products of their own and with the 21st century, they are able to add to the global market of skin care.


Amra-Lear-2014Amra Lear is a licensed massage therapist and aesthetician. She has been working in the spa industry for over 19 years and is well-versed in many streamlined modalities and products. With her vast experience and knowledge, Lear has created a blog (www.amralear.com) in which she highlights spa treatments, skin care products, and massage practices.

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By Jeremy Lawrence | January 18, 2019

When the drug review began over 30 years ago, the focus was predominantly on UVB protection or sunburn protection. The recommendation was skin that was unprotected would cause skin cancer and premature aging. So, chemist began formulating sun blocks and sunscreens that touted an SPF (sun protection factor) claiming that by applying these solutions one could stay engaged in outdoor activities longer without damaging the skin. The American Academy of Dermatology and the Skin Cancer Foundation have emphasized the best way to prevent skin cancer was to use sunscreens with a minimum of SPF 15. They also include the recommendation to wear clothing, hats, and sunglasses for added protection.

FDA further mandated that to protect the consumers and to ensure their safety, UVA should be addressed as well. To promote efficacy of products they devised a UVA rating system. It is called the Four-Star System. Under the proposed regulation, a UVA star rating would be prominently displayed on sunscreen labels, near the SPF rating.

The proposed UVA rating system: 

  • One star represent low UVA protection
  • Two stars respresent medium protection
  • Three stars represent high protection
  • Four stars represent the highest UVA protection available in an over-the-counter (OTC)
    sunscreen product.

If a sunscreen product does not rate at least one star, FDA proposed that labeling bear a “no UVA protection” marking on the front label, near the SPF value. FDA also amended its existing 1999 rule to increase the SPF from SPF 30+ to SPF 50+. Previously, FDA had recognized SPF values up to 30+. In addition they are allowing for new combinations of active ingredients. Research released in the 21st century reveals that in hindsight focusing on the effects of UVA and UVB may fall short in protecting the consumer. The use of sunscreen chemicals may be increasing the incidence of cancer and that sunlight exposure may actually decrease human cancer rates and improve your health. In this article, I would like to present a fresh perspective on detection, prevention, and a responsible approach to protect the skin from injury and premature aging, while considering the effects on the whole body and establishing a platform for further investigation.

Chemical Sunscreens and Three Primary Defects

  • They are powerful free radical generators.
  • They often have strong estrogenic activity.
  • They are synthetic chemicals that are alien to the human body and accumulate in body fat stores.

In the 1970s, Howard Maibach warned that up to 35 percent of sunscreen applied to the skin could pass through the skin and enter the bloodstream but this had little effect on sunscreen promotion or safety testing.1 The longer sunscreen chemicals are left on the skin, the greater the absorption into the body.2

Free Radical Generators
It is not that these compounds were ever viewed as benign substances. Organic chemists have been aware of the dangers of compounds in chemical sunscreens for years.
Chemicals are widely used to start free radical reactions during chemical synthesis. For instance Benzophenone is activated by ultraviolet light energy that breaks benzophenone’s double bond to produce two free radical sites. The free radicals then react with other molecules and produce damage to the fats, proteins, and DNA of the cells – the types of damage that produce skin aging and the development
of cancer.
Currently, the FDA approves avobenzone as a safe and effective active ingredient and is one of the suggested UVA blockers. Avobenzone, which is a chemical easily absorbed through the epidermis absorbs ultraviolet radiation energy. Since it cannot destroy this energy, it has to convert the light energy into chemical energy, which is normally released as free radicals.

Other free radical generators:

  • Oxybenzone – powerful free radical generator
  • Dioxybenzone – powerful free radical generator
  • Butyl methoxydibenzoylmethane – Toxic properties

Researchers at Harvard Medical School discovered that psoralen a psoriasis medication, is an ultraviolet light-activated, free radical generator that is chemically similar to sunscreens and is an extremely efficient carcinogen. They found that the rate of squamous cell carcinoma among patients with psoriasis, who had been repeatedly treated with UVA light after a topical application of psoralen, was 83 times higher than among the general population 3

Worldwide, the greatest rise in melanoma has been experienced in countries where chemical sunscreens have been heavily promoted. The rise in melanoma has been exceptionally high in Queensland, Australia, where the medical establishment has vigorously promoted the use of sunscreens. Queensland now has more incidences of melanoma per capita than any other place on earth. 4

Skin’s Natural Defense
Investigation into skin’s natural ability to defend itself reveals startling changes that should be considered when adding synthetics to aid in protection. Skin acts as a durable exterior barrier that provides light protection, prevents bacterial invasion, waterproofing, and protection from abrasion and injury. It is the first line of defense for the body. Within this system of defense lie five mechanisms that provide specific protection.
1st – Sebum – The chemical constituents of sebum provide antimicrobial properties warding off bacteria and pathogens from harming internal organs and tissue. It also prevents absorption of unwanted and potentially dangerous chemicals. Sebum has nutritional value, which helps in protection of cell structure and growth.
2nd – Stratum Corneum – The second line of defense
is characterized as an intercellular cementing of fibers formed from the dead, cornified cells that acts as armor
to shield bacteria and pathogens from injuring underlying living cells. It also prohibits certain chemicals from penetration.
3rd – Hair – The key role of hair is to provide protection against heat loss. Since hair is also cuticle like the keratinized cells of the stratum corneum, it too acts as armor to diffuse penetration of irritants and pathogens. Hair supports the excretion of waste and toxins and is vehicle for transporting sebum to the surface of the skin.
4th – Immunology – The Langerhan cells play an active role in immunity through immunological surveillance. They are found in the stratum granulosum and the stratum spinosum. If pathogens make it past the first three lines of defense, the skin’s immune system kicks in by producing antibodies to diffuse bacteria.
5th – Melanin – is a stable molecule, which absorbs harmful UV-radiation and transforms the energy into harmless amounts of heat. This property enables melanin to dissipate more than 99.9 percent of the absorbed UV radiation as heat and it keeps the generation of free radicals at a minimum.
A major aspect of the innate immune defense system against invading pathogens involves melanin. Within minutes after infection, the microbe is encapsulated within melanin (melanization), and the generation of free radical byproducts during the formation of this capsule is thought to aid in their destruction.
Skin treatments have become mechanical and chemically bloated, forcing these systems of defense to shift into high
gear. People are experiencing an increase in hair growth, oiliness, flakiness, hyperpigmentation, and inflammation. These are all indications that skin perceives itself as vulnerable, exposed, and defenseless. Pollutants, not managing stress, medication, sleep deprivation, and poor diet also affect the degradation of skin’s integrity.


Individuals misusing medical procedures to rejuvenate the skin have broken skin defense. As we explore responsible measures for sun protection, considering the integrity of skin is paramount. Focusing on sun exposure should include insuring skin does not lose it’s ability to defend.

Recommended Sun Protection
Here are recommendations for a holistic approach for prevention and protection:

  • Don’t overexfoliate or peel the skin. Ensure the integrity of the stratum corneum is kept in tact. Skin between the ages of 12 to 28, should never be peeled or have microdermabration. During this age group, the majority of skin damage occurs.Exfoliation should be done two times a week. Skin between the ages of 28 and up should exfoliate two to three times a week. Skin peels are recommended twice a year and not when the sunlight is strongest. Treatments are recommended late fall and early spring, when daylight savings changes.
  • Make sure and use skin care products that inhibit collagenase. Collagenase is an enzyme that destroys collagen and disrupts receptor activity around the cell.
  • Be sure and use a lot of antioxidants, both topically and internally.
  • Never use synthetic chemical sunscreens.
  • Use sunscreens that utilize minerals like zinc for added protection.
  • Sun Diffusers are the newest entry to the market and should be investigated.
  • Mineral makeups provide added protection as the minerals reflect sunlight.
  • Limit your sun exposure to off peak times of the day – 8 a.m. to 11 p.m. and 3 p.m. to 6 p.m.
  • Have skin checked regularly for any abnormal growths.

Detection - Identifying Skin Abnormalities Major signs:

Change in size
Change in shape
Change in color

 Minor signs:

Inflammation
Crusting or bleeding
Sensory change
Diameter of seven mm or more

 

The “ABCDE” rule can help you look for signs of skin cancer. When you look at moles on your skin, look for the following:

ABCDE Rule
A for asymmetry: A mole that, when divided in half, doesn’t look the same on both sides
B for border: A mole with edges that are blurry or jagged
C for color: Changes in the color of a mole, including darkening, spread of color, loss of color, or the appearance of multiple colors such as blue, red, white, pink, purple or gray
D for diameter: A mole larger than 1/4 inch in diameter (about the size of a pencil eraser)
E for elevation: A mole that is raised above the skin and has a rough surface

You should also watch for the following skin changes:

  • mole that bleeds
  • mole that grows fast
  • scaly or crusted growth on the skin sore that won’t heal mole that itches
  • place on your skin that feels rough, like sandpaper
  • The most common site for squamous cell carcinoma of the skin is the head and neck region.
  • The most common sites for malignant melanoma include the legs in women and the upper back in both men and women.
  • Actinic keratoses, sometimes called solar keratoses, often arise on chronically sun-damaged body areas such as the face, ears, arms and hands.

When providing skin treatments, if you notice a mole that has changed, or if a new mole doesn’t look like other moles, encourage your client to visit their doctor. Skin cancer can be treated successfully if it’s treated early. Ask them if the growth is new and/or how long it has been there. Explain that you are not qualified to diagnose the growth, but would recommend that they have a doctor evaluate their skin.
There is still much to investigate regarding skin cancer and healthy choices for prevention and protection. Be sure the information you are provided is evidence-based. It is essential to keep informed on this subject as scientists from all areas are continually researching the safest way to protect our skin and stay cancer free.

(Endnotes)
1 (Maibach, H. “NDELA-Percutaneous Penetration.” FDA Contract 223-75-2340, May 19, 1978)
2 (Bronaugh, R.L., et al. “The effect of cosmetic vehicles on the penetration of N-nitrosodiethanolamine through excised human skin, J Invest Dermatol; 1981; 76(2): 94-96.)
3 (Stern, Robert S. and Laid, Nan. The carcinogenic risk of treatments for severe psoriasis. Cancer, Vol. 73, No. 11, June 1, 1994, pp. 2759-64).
4 (Garland, Cedric F., et al. could sunscreens increase melanoma risk? American Journal of Public Health, Vol. 82, No. 4, April 1992, pp. 614-15).

Anne Willis has been part of the aesthetic industry for more than 30 years. She offers premier educational programs and customized training to schools and spas and is CEO of De La Terre Skincare. Her programs are taught throughout the country delivering innovative solutions and quality support. The highest standard for education insures maximum success for your staff and the facility. 828-230-5125, info@annecwillis.com, www.anncwillis.com

 



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By | January 18, 2019

skinfact1


nailpolishFall's Top Three Nail Hues!
by Suzi Weiss-Fischmann, OPI artistic director

Vivid red and noticeable neutrals are what I suggest for this fall. Define the look of nails for fall and winter, shades that revive classic, iconic colors – from cool gray, khaki and chocolate to warm rose, peach and red. This season, red will appear as an accent color in clothing, home goods, beauty and accessories; with its richly-pigmented color. The neutral trend that started in 2011 will continue throughout 2012, but with deeper, more opulent hues like dark taupe and olive green khaki, for a striking contrast to past seasons’ barely-there nude tones. These three shades complement trends from the runway, and can be worn with delicate feminine pieces or more dramatic menswear touches. For a glamorous yet affordable look, these three lacquer colors will offer the perfect accessory for this winter. ♦

 

makeup

According to CARA Cosmetics there are three top reasons salons fail to a have a successful makeup department

  • Many owners rely on new or inexperienced employees to make the makeup sales and services successful. 
  • Inadequate compensation for makeup artist, lack of retail incentive. 
  • Insufficient makeup artistry training of or makeup sales knowledge. ♦

 



Vanish Veins, Painlessly!
by Dr. Luis Navarro

Women are 10 times more likely to develop varicose and spider veins than men. The reason we develop veins is genetics, they are inherited from our parents and even grandparents. If you are born with this predisposition to develop unsightly veins they can appear as early as your teens and worsen as you age due to a variety of contributing factors. Women have many more accelerating factors than men, such as pregnancy, birth control pills and hormone replacement therapy. Other factors that plague both sexes are obesity, lack of exercise, weight fluctuation, constipation, prolonged periods of sitting or standing and the aging process.
Varicose veins are large, protruding and rope-like in nature and develop due to a weakening of vein valves and vein walls. Leg veins are fitted with one-way valves that assist in the pumping of blood back to the heart and lungs and thus preventing blood from flowing backwards. When a valve weakens or becomes defective, gravity forces the blood back down, which collects in the lower legs, causing the veins to bulge outward.
Spider veins are tiny dilated capillaries medically referred to as telangiectases, are blue, red or purplish in color and can crop up in clusters resembling a spider web. In addition to being unsightly and often embarrassing, varicose veins and spider veins can also cause discomfort, with symptoms such as, throbbing, heaviness, achiness and leg cramps.
Unsightly veins can appear on the legs, face, hands and or breasts. Once veins appear they will not disappear on their own you will need to seek treatment to alleviate the symptoms and vanish the veins.
Using the latest technologies and the most advanced therapies will achieve the best possible cosmetic results for your patients. You as a professional should refer your patients to a facility that offers all the modern forms of treatment, such as “painless” sclerotherapy, duplex-guided and foam sclerotherapy, TIGOS, laser therapy, EVLA, mini-phlebectomy, and ambulatory surgery. Which treatment or combination of treatments is best suited for a patient will depend on the type, size, location and depth of the vein problem. After a leg examination and non-invasive testing, such as doppler and if needed ultrasound, a proper diagnosis and treatment plan is developed. 

veins

Sclerotherapy or “injection therapy” can successfully treat 90 percent of all varicose veins and nearly 100 percent of spider veins safely, effectively and painlessly − with excellent cosmetic results. 

Modern sclerotherapy is a spray of cold air temporarily numbs the area during injections. With the use of advancements in magnification, polarized light, transillumination and infrared light veins are now more visible under the skin, thus improving results and reducing treatment time. Sclerotherapy, or injection therapy, is the most common treatment for spider and varicose veins on the legs (facial, breast and hand veins may also be treated). Sclerotherapy consists of injecting a mild chemical solution into the problem vein, which causes the vein to close; the blood is then re-routed to a healthy vein. The body's natural healing process will absorb the closed vein restoring proper circulation leaving the patient’s legs free of unsightly and often painful varicose and spider veins.
Once treated, there are a few tips to help maintain healthy veins: Exercise regularly, monitor BCP and hormone intake, elevate legs, maintain a proper weight, eat a high fiber diet and wear compression stockings.
The treatment of veins is an intricate process and requires an experienced vein specialist. To find a vein specialist in your area, check the American College of Phlebology for a board certified specialist. To find out more about veins go to www.veintreatmentcenter.com. ♦ 


girl1Top Tips to Treat and Prevent Acne During the Winter
by Dr. Tachmes

Many people are not aware, but the winter season is actually worse for acne. The constant exposure to drastic temperature changes, from cold outside to indoor heated environments, cause an excess of dead skin cells which clog pores. The myth is that most people believe only excess oil causes pimples in the summer months. However, winter is worse. If your skin becomes extremely dry and irritated from the cold weather your body will then go into repair mode causing the oil glands to go into overdrive resulting in the same outcome.

Recommended Regimen: If breakouts occur use a salicylic acid-based cleanser in the morning and evening (over cleansing will strip your skin of its protective layer and cause additional irritation and dryness) to minimize oil production and impurities and a benzyl peroxide during the day to kill bacteria.

Moisturize: Use a non-clogging oil-based moisturizer during the colder months. Intense indoor heat and cold temperatures can easily cause surface dryness and damage which prevents your skin from holding in water. A great hydrating agent such as hyaluronic acid will help seal in water within the underlying layers. This simple step will help to restore the moisture back into the epidermis allowing your skin to hold water within while strengthening your skins natural defense system.

Hydration: Not everyone drinks as much fluid as they should, especially during the winter months. Normally dehydrated, dry skin starts from within, so you must drink a sufficient amount of water daily. This keeps your body and skin hydrated from the inside-out avoiding cellular breakdown, pre-mature aging and
extreme dryness.

Exfoliation: Whether it is hot or cold, not exfoliating regularly can increase cellular build up and clog pores. Sloughing off dead skin cells two to three times a week will help keep your skin functioning properly minimizing vulnerability to extreme temperature changes. ♦

skinfact2 

 

The Professional Beauty Association's Three Main Tracking Indices for the Salon and Spa Industry Experience Declines from Record Highs in Second Quarter 2011

salonimageThe Professional Beauty Association's (PBA) three main tracking indices for the salon/spa industry which include the Salon & Spa Performance Index (SSPI), Current Situation Index and Expectations Index, experienced declines from their record highs in the first quarter of 2011 and year-over-year results. The SSPI, which is the main index of the three, is a quarterly composite index that tracks the health and outlook of the U.S. salon/spa industry. The SSPI declined 1% from the first quarter of 2011 to stand at 103 in the second quarter. This is also a .6% decline from year-over-year results compared to the second quarter of 2010. Combined with quarterly drops in the Current Situation Index and Expectations Index of 1% and .9% respectively, these results are discouraging considering the steady gains all three indices had been making in prior quarters. All indices remain above a base level measurement of 100, which is still positive for the industry as a whole.
The Current Situation Index, which measures current trends in five industry indicators (service sales, retail sales, customer traffic, employees/hours and capital expenditures), fell to 101.5 in the second quarter – down 1% from first quarter 2011 and .7% from second quarter 2010. Despite the decline, the Current Situation Index remained above 100 for the sixth consecutive quarter, which represents expansion in the current situation indicators. Sales and customer traffic levels remained positive overall in the second quarter and salon/spa owners reported a net increase in staffing levels.
The Expectations Index, which measures salon/spa owners' six-month outlook on five industry indicators (service sales, retail sales, employees and hours, capital expenditures and business conditions) has remained relatively unchanged for the past year, fell to 104.4% – down .9% from first quarter 2011 and .6% from second quarter 2010. Along with the Current Situation Index, the Expectations Index remains above a base level of 100, which indicates expansion and an overall positive viewpoint. Salon/spa owners were most optimistic about stronger service sales in the coming months, but felt less favorably towards retail sales, capital expenditures, and the direction of the overall economy. Fifty-two percent of salon/spa owners expect to increase staffing levels in the coming months, a positive for the broader labor market in the U.S.
The full SSPI report and the "Salon & Spa Tracking Survey" can be found at www.probeauty.org/research. ♦


Rose Scented Cleaner

Cleaning countertops and sinks will be downright enticing with this lovely blend. Baking soda raises the pH of the cleanser and can help prevent corrosion of faucets.

rosesIngredients:

  • 1 cup baking soda
  • 1 tbsp. salt
  • ¼ cup rose petals

Directions: Pulverize the ingredients together in a blender. Sprinkle on area to be scoured, wet slightly, and scrub.

Important: Whenever you create a homemade cleaning product, you should test it in an inconspicuous spot before using it, to make sure it will not stain, fade or otherwise affect your carpet, upholstery, woodwork, wallpaper, et cetera. ♦

Copyright© Frontier Natural Products Co-op

 

lemonade

 

Carrot and Its Benefits for Skin Care

bunchcarrots

Carrots have been around the Middle East and throughout Europe for centuries. It is believed that the wild carrot originated in Afghanistan and was small, tough and pale-fleshed. The familiar edible root, which is unmistakably orange, was actually developed by the Dutch during the 17th century.
Chinese medical practitioners recommend eating carrots to give your liver more energy, and research has also shown that this vegetable has a protective effect against ultraviolet light (in other words they will help you look younger, longer).

Carrot Oil
The Greeks and the Romans were also well aware of the medicinal properties of carrot… or more specifically the oil from carrots. Early alchemists identified the benefits of the roots oil while using a mixture of carrot seed oil, bergamot and lemon oil to treat a variety of skin and stomach disorders. Through a process of steam distillation, carrot oil is harvested and is, even to this day, one of the most underrated essential oils in aromatherapy. 
This powerful detoxifier and skin rejuvenator, when applied to skin stimulates the epidermal cells – helping to regulate wrinkles. It strengthens the mucous membranes, and can help alleviate arthritis, gout, rheumatism and edema symptoms. In addition, its ability to revitalize the skin and its ability to alleviate skin problems like acne, eczema, rashes, psoriasis, ulcers, dermatitis, weeping sores and boils have been well documented.

Its therapeutic properties are astounding; it is an antiseptic, diuretic, carminative, depurative, hepatic, stimulant, vermifuge, tonic – just to name a few – and it is an essential ingredient in vapor therapy, which boosts the respiratory system. When carrot oil is massaged into the skin or diluted in a bath it relieves muscle pain and increases the production of red blood cells. When blended with bergamot, juniper, lavender, lemon, lime, cedarwood, geranium and other citrus and spicy oils the results range from complete body detoxification to relieving fluid retention, which helps anorexia sufferers.

carrotsglassesandbenefits


Carrot Juice

carrotsoapDrinking carrot juice has both internal and external benefits. Why? Simply put… its antioxidant and vitamin content.
Externally, the benefits provided from the vitamin A and C found in carrot juice are extremely healthy for skin. A single carrot can supply the body’s vitamin A needs for the whole day. Vitamin A is essential for body tissue growth; it provides antioxidant benefits, attacking free radicals, and acts as a natural sun block and help in healing sunburns. The benefits of vitamin C help promote skin elasticity, with collagen production. It helps improve uneven skin tone, prevents scars, revitalizes skin, helps get rid of blackheads, provides acne relief, has anti-inflammatory properties, and promotes smooth, soft and supple skin.
Internally, drinking carrot juice helps remove indigestible fiber. The nutrients found in carrot juice are available to the body in much larger quantities than if the carrot was eaten whole. This is because many of the nutrients are trapped in the fiber, and while fiber aids digestion, some part of the fiber is indigestible. Thus, you do not get the benefits of the nutrients that are trapped in the indigestible fiber.carrotjuicequoteWith its detoxifying, rejuvenating, and therapeutic properties it is no wonder that although it was never touted as the “Fountain of Youth,” the Romans and Greeks thought it was, and that thought continues to live on in the minds of people around the world.

*Note: eating an excessive amount of carrots may cause the skin to yellow temporarily (this is considered harmless, just reduce your intake). Carrot seeds are also a nerve tonic and will induce abortion. So, reduce the amount or avoid it during pregnancy. ♦




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By | January 18, 2019

skinfact1

 

nailpolishFall's Top Three Nail Hues!
by Suzi Weiss-Fischmann, OPI artistic director

Vivid red and noticeable neutrals are what I suggest for this fall. Define the look of nails for fall and winter, shades that revive classic, iconic colors – from cool gray, khaki and chocolate to warm rose, peach and red. This season, red will appear as an accent color in clothing, home goods, beauty and accessories; with its richly-pigmented color. The neutral trend that started in 2011 will continue throughout 2012, but with deeper, more opulent hues like dark taupe and olive green khaki, for a striking contrast to past seasons’ barely-there nude tones. These three shades complement trends from the runway, and can be worn with delicate feminine pieces or more dramatic menswear touches. For a glamorous yet affordable look, these three lacquer colors will offer the perfect accessory for this winter. ♦

 

makeup

According to CARA Cosmetics there are three top reasons salons fail to a have a successful makeup department

  • Many owners rely on new or inexperienced employees to make the makeup sales and services successful. 
  • Inadequate compensation for makeup artist, lack of retail incentive. 
  • Insufficient makeup artistry training of or makeup sales knowledge. ♦

 

 

 

Vanish Veins, Painlessly!
by Dr. Luis Navarro

Women are 10 times more likely to develop varicose and spider veins than men. The reason we develop veins is genetics, they are inherited from our parents and even grandparents. If you are born with this predisposition to develop unsightly veins they can appear as early as your teens and worsen as you age due to a variety of contributing factors. Women have many more accelerating factors than men, such as pregnancy, birth control pills and hormone replacement therapy. Other factors that plague both sexes are obesity, lack of exercise, weight fluctuation, constipation, prolonged periods of sitting or standing and the aging process.
Varicose veins are large, protruding and rope-like in nature and develop due to a weakening of vein valves and vein walls. Leg veins are fitted with one-way valves that assist in the pumping of blood back to the heart and lungs and thus preventing blood from flowing backwards. When a valve weakens or becomes defective, gravity forces the blood back down, which collects in the lower legs, causing the veins to bulge outward.
Spider veins are tiny dilated capillaries medically referred to as telangiectases, are blue, red or purplish in color and can crop up in clusters resembling a spider web. In addition to being unsightly and often embarrassing, varicose veins and spider veins can also cause discomfort, with symptoms such as, throbbing, heaviness, achiness and leg cramps.
Unsightly veins can appear on the legs, face, hands and or breasts. Once veins appear they will not disappear on their own you will need to seek treatment to alleviate the symptoms and vanish the veins.
Using the latest technologies and the most advanced therapies will achieve the best possible cosmetic results for your patients. You as a professional should refer your patients to a facility that offers all the modern forms of treatment, such as “painless” sclerotherapy, duplex-guided and foam sclerotherapy, TIGOS, laser therapy, EVLA, mini-phlebectomy, and ambulatory surgery. Which treatment or combination of treatments is best suited for a patient will depend on the type, size, location and depth of the vein problem. After a leg examination and non-invasive testing, such as doppler and if needed ultrasound, a proper diagnosis and treatment plan is developed. 

veins

Sclerotherapy or “injection therapy” can successfully treat 90 percent of all varicose veins and nearly 100 percent of spider veins safely, effectively and painlessly − with excellent cosmetic results. 

Modern sclerotherapy is a spray of cold air temporarily numbs the area during injections. With the use of advancements in magnification, polarized light, transillumination and infrared light veins are now more visible under the skin, thus improving results and reducing treatment time. Sclerotherapy, or injection therapy, is the most common treatment for spider and varicose veins on the legs (facial, breast and hand veins may also be treated). Sclerotherapy consists of injecting a mild chemical solution into the problem vein, which causes the vein to close; the blood is then re-routed to a healthy vein. The body's natural healing process will absorb the closed vein restoring proper circulation leaving the patient’s legs free of unsightly and often painful varicose and spider veins.
Once treated, there are a few tips to help maintain healthy veins: Exercise regularly, monitor BCP and hormone intake, elevate legs, maintain a proper weight, eat a high fiber diet and wear compression stockings.
The treatment of veins is an intricate process and requires an experienced vein specialist. To find a vein specialist in your area, check the American College of Phlebology for a board certified specialist. To find out more about veins go to www.veintreatmentcenter.com. ♦ 

 

girl1Top Tips to Treat and Prevent Acne During the Winter
by Dr. Tachmes

Many people are not aware, but the winter season is actually worse for acne. The constant exposure to drastic temperature changes, from cold outside to indoor heated environments, cause an excess of dead skin cells which clog pores. The myth is that most people believe only excess oil causes pimples in the summer months. However, winter is worse. If your skin becomes extremely dry and irritated from the cold weather your body will then go into repair mode causing the oil glands to go into overdrive resulting in the same outcome.

Recommended Regimen: If breakouts occur use a salicylic acid-based cleanser in the morning and evening (over cleansing will strip your skin of its protective layer and cause additional irritation and dryness) to minimize oil production and impurities and a benzyl peroxide during the day to kill bacteria.

Moisturize: Use a non-clogging oil-based moisturizer during the colder months. Intense indoor heat and cold temperatures can easily cause surface dryness and damage which prevents your skin from holding in water. A great hydrating agent such as hyaluronic acid will help seal in water within the underlying layers. This simple step will help to restore the moisture back into the epidermis allowing your skin to hold water within while strengthening your skins natural defense system.

Hydration: Not everyone drinks as much fluid as they should, especially during the winter months. Normally dehydrated, dry skin starts from within, so you must drink a sufficient amount of water daily. This keeps your body and skin hydrated from the inside-out avoiding cellular breakdown, pre-mature aging and
extreme dryness.

Exfoliation: Whether it is hot or cold, not exfoliating regularly can increase cellular build up and clog pores. Sloughing off dead skin cells two to three times a week will help keep your skin functioning properly minimizing vulnerability to extreme temperature changes. ♦

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The Professional Beauty Association's Three Main Tracking Indices for the Salon and Spa Industry Experience Declines from Record Highs in Second Quarter 2011

salonimageThe Professional Beauty Association's (PBA) three main tracking indices for the salon/spa industry which include the Salon & Spa Performance Index (SSPI), Current Situation Index and Expectations Index, experienced declines from their record highs in the first quarter of 2011 and year-over-year results. The SSPI, which is the main index of the three, is a quarterly composite index that tracks the health and outlook of the U.S. salon/spa industry. The SSPI declined 1% from the first quarter of 2011 to stand at 103 in the second quarter. This is also a .6% decline from year-over-year results compared to the second quarter of 2010. Combined with quarterly drops in the Current Situation Index and Expectations Index of 1% and .9% respectively, these results are discouraging considering the steady gains all three indices had been making in prior quarters. All indices remain above a base level measurement of 100, which is still positive for the industry as a whole.
The Current Situation Index, which measures current trends in five industry indicators (service sales, retail sales, customer traffic, employees/hours and capital expenditures), fell to 101.5 in the second quarter – down 1% from first quarter 2011 and .7% from second quarter 2010. Despite the decline, the Current Situation Index remained above 100 for the sixth consecutive quarter, which represents expansion in the current situation indicators. Sales and customer traffic levels remained positive overall in the second quarter and salon/spa owners reported a net increase in staffing levels.
The Expectations Index, which measures salon/spa owners' six-month outlook on five industry indicators (service sales, retail sales, employees and hours, capital expenditures and business conditions) has remained relatively unchanged for the past year, fell to 104.4% – down .9% from first quarter 2011 and .6% from second quarter 2010. Along with the Current Situation Index, the Expectations Index remains above a base level of 100, which indicates expansion and an overall positive viewpoint. Salon/spa owners were most optimistic about stronger service sales in the coming months, but felt less favorably towards retail sales, capital expenditures, and the direction of the overall economy. Fifty-two percent of salon/spa owners expect to increase staffing levels in the coming months, a positive for the broader labor market in the U.S.
The full SSPI report and the "Salon & Spa Tracking Survey" can be found at www.probeauty.org/research. ♦

 

Rose Scented Cleaner

Cleaning countertops and sinks will be downright enticing with this lovely blend. Baking soda raises the pH of the cleanser and can help prevent corrosion of faucets.

rosesIngredients:

  • 1 cup baking soda
  • 1 tbsp. salt
  • ¼ cup rose petals

Directions: Pulverize the ingredients together in a blender. Sprinkle on area to be scoured, wet slightly, and scrub.

Important: Whenever you create a homemade cleaning product, you should test it in an inconspicuous spot before using it, to make sure it will not stain, fade or otherwise affect your carpet, upholstery, woodwork, wallpaper, et cetera. ♦

Copyright© Frontier Natural Products Co-op

 

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Carrot and Its Benefits for Skin Care

bunchcarrots

Carrots have been around the Middle East and throughout Europe for centuries. It is believed that the wild carrot originated in Afghanistan and was small, tough and pale-fleshed. The familiar edible root, which is unmistakably orange, was actually developed by the Dutch during the 17th century.
Chinese medical practitioners recommend eating carrots to give your liver more energy, and research has also shown that this vegetable has a protective effect against ultraviolet light (in other words they will help you look younger, longer).

Carrot Oil
The Greeks and the Romans were also well aware of the medicinal properties of carrot… or more specifically the oil from carrots. Early alchemists identified the benefits of the roots oil while using a mixture of carrot seed oil, bergamot and lemon oil to treat a variety of skin and stomach disorders. Through a process of steam distillation, carrot oil is harvested and is, even to this day, one of the most underrated essential oils in aromatherapy. 
This powerful detoxifier and skin rejuvenator, when applied to skin stimulates the epidermal cells – helping to regulate wrinkles. It strengthens the mucous membranes, and can help alleviate arthritis, gout, rheumatism and edema symptoms. In addition, its ability to revitalize the skin and its ability to alleviate skin problems like acne, eczema, rashes, psoriasis, ulcers, dermatitis, weeping sores and boils have been well documented.

Its therapeutic properties are astounding; it is an antiseptic, diuretic, carminative, depurative, hepatic, stimulant, vermifuge, tonic – just to name a few – and it is an essential ingredient in vapor therapy, which boosts the respiratory system. When carrot oil is massaged into the skin or diluted in a bath it relieves muscle pain and increases the production of red blood cells. When blended with bergamot, juniper, lavender, lemon, lime, cedarwood, geranium and other citrus and spicy oils the results range from complete body detoxification to relieving fluid retention, which helps anorexia sufferers.

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Carrot Juice

carrotsoapDrinking carrot juice has both internal and external benefits. Why? Simply put… its antioxidant and vitamin content.
Externally, the benefits provided from the vitamin A and C found in carrot juice are extremely healthy for skin. A single carrot can supply the body’s vitamin A needs for the whole day. Vitamin A is essential for body tissue growth; it provides antioxidant benefits, attacking free radicals, and acts as a natural sun block and help in healing sunburns. The benefits of vitamin C help promote skin elasticity, with collagen production. It helps improve uneven skin tone, prevents scars, revitalizes skin, helps get rid of blackheads, provides acne relief, has anti-inflammatory properties, and promotes smooth, soft and supple skin.
Internally, drinking carrot juice helps remove indigestible fiber. The nutrients found in carrot juice are available to the body in much larger quantities than if the carrot was eaten whole. This is because many of the nutrients are trapped in the fiber, and while fiber aids digestion, some part of the fiber is indigestible. Thus, you do not get the benefits of the nutrients that are trapped in the indigestible fiber.carrotjuicequoteWith its detoxifying, rejuvenating, and therapeutic properties it is no wonder that although it was never touted as the “Fountain of Youth,” the Romans and Greeks thought it was, and that thought continues to live on in the minds of people around the world.

*Note: eating an excessive amount of carrots may cause the skin to yellow temporarily (this is considered harmless, just reduce your intake). Carrot seeds are also a nerve tonic and will induce abortion. So, reduce the amount or avoid it during pregnancy. ♦

 



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