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By | January 18, 2019

21st Century Television is pleased to announce that Naturel Collagen has won the prestigious “Telly Award” for excellence in programming. Naturel Collagen offers anti-aging products that use fish-based collagen, which interacts perfectly with the human body. Naturel Collagen’s products possess epidermal repair properties never before seen in synthetic and bovine-based collagen products.



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21st Century Labs
January 18, 2019

salon-spa21st Century Laboratory produces cutting edge hair care, skin care, spa, cosmetic, and cosmeceutical formulations with natural ingredients and organically grown botanicals, including sulfate free formulations.Our combination of highly specialized equipment and extensive background in the cosmetics industry allows us to innovate or optimize top-notch cosmeceuticals for private labeling. Our methodology at 21st Century Laboratory requires the strictest quality control standards.



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By Jeremy Lawrence | January 18, 2019

Great customer service is the cornerstone of any business – keeping clients happy with their services and overall brand will keep them coming back.

Customer service now goes well beyond talking to the front desk staff, calling the customer care line, or even sending an e-mail. Customer service lives on social media, which makes it a very visible part of the business' brand.

This news is great for businesses because social media offers an opportunity to immediately connect with customers, solve any issues, and keep the business at the top of the customer's mind.

pic-1BENEFITS OF CUSTOMER CARE ON SOCIAL MEDIA
Increases Accessibility
Regardless of the industry of a business, that business' customers are on social media: They are engaging with friends and colleagues and while they are at it, they may just engage with a business. Clients take to social media to share their experiences with businesses – good or bad – ask questions, and look for solutions to problems. Sending a tweet, posting to a brand's Facebook wall, or commenting on an Instagram picture can be easier than making a phone call or writing an e-mail because that customer is already actively on the business' social platform. As a business, this access provides an opportunity to answer clients' questions in whichever way is easiest and most accessible.

Engagement Begets Engagement (and Trust)
The more skin care professionals engage with clients online, the more others will begin to engage with the professional. If a client sees the professional answer another client's question or resolve a complaint on social media, that client will be more likely to reach out to the professional on social media. Responding directly to the client on the platform in which they asked the question also allows current and potential clients to see the great customer service the professional offers. This engagement not only encourages professionals to be more active with their online presence, but also builds trust with their clients. Furthermore, the more people the professional engages with on these platforms, the more searchable and discoverable their profile becomes, making it easier for new clients to find them.

Expanding the Relationship Beyond the Treatment Room
Building a social media presence for the spa and engaging with clients online allows the professional to foster and grow connections with clients even when they are not receiving a service. Extending good customer service to any feedback the professional receives on social media, positive or negative, reinforces the positive experiences the client has had within the treatment room and the spa. This response furthers the connection the client feels to the business and the brand.

Third Party Recommendations
Recommendations from friends and family can make a huge difference when potential clients are deciding where or from whom to receive a service. The same can be said for online reviews and conversations. The internet has opened up a world of research that allows people to explore others' experiences with something they may want to try and many people turn to social media for such research. Engaging in customer service online creates a history of those conversations for others to view when looking for a service, which could draw new clients to the professional's business.

pic-2Social Listening
Monitoring what people are saying about the spa on social media platforms is called social listening. Fostering conversations across social media also allows professionals another avenue to listen to their clients and gain important insight into what people think of their business. Clients will share both positive and negative experiences, which will help the professional understand what is going well in their business and what they can improve upon.

For example, the professional might see multiple clients raving about one product or service and consistently complaining about another. The professional may want to find ways to expand the service that is getting great reviews and reevaluate what is receiving criticism. The professional might find that a particular employee consistently receives positive feedback for going the extra mile; find out what that employee is doing and encourage the rest of the staff to do the same.

Negative feedback is not always so obvious. Take note of posts that receive high engagement and compare them to posts that receive little-to-no engagement. High engagement is telling of what is popular among clients, while low engagement will show the converse. Finding a common denominator between high-engagement posts can help determine what clients are most interested in hearing about. The professional can then apply that information to the rest of their social media content.

MANAGING CUSTOMER SERVICE ON SOCIAL MEDIA
Putting in the Time
Managing customer service on social media requires a time commitment. The professional will need to dedicate resources to manage their accounts; someone has to post content, answer questions, and respond to any feedback. This time commitment does not mean the spa needs to have a staff member solely dedicated to social media, but they will need to have someone, or multiple people, responsible for monitoring their channels on a regular basis. Some businesses have one person that regularly monitors their social platforms, while others rotate the responsibility between multiple staff members. The amount of time spent monitoring the accounts will depend on the number of social media platforms being utilized, the size of the spa's following, and the amount of engagement from clients. The best advice is to start slowly. Pick one or two social platforms to use when getting started. The professional will be able to dedicate more time to each of them and better gauge what the overall time commitment will need to be.

Real Time Responses
One of the most important things to remember about social media is that it is immediate. When someone goes on social media, they are looking for instant gratification – a quick response to their question, an acknowledgment of their complaint, or even a "like" to their positive feedback. Businesses that are the most successful on social media acknowledge any comments as quickly as possible, even if they have to follow up with more information later.

Addressing Concerns and Negative Feedback
After a negative experience, people often turn to social media to either share their experience or look for a resolution to their issue. When the professional receives this type of communication, whether it is through a comment, review, or direct message, the best thing for them to do is acknowledge the client's concern in a timely manner. Even if the professional is not able to immediately answer the client's question or solve their problem, a quick response makes the client feel heard and goes a long way in resolving an issue positively. The professional should let the client know they are looking into the concern and will follow up with the full answer or resolution once they have it. It is also essential to thank them for their feedback, which not only shows the client that the spa wants to correct the situation, but also shows anyone else who sees the online interaction that client satisfaction is of the utmost importance.

Taking Customer Service Offline
Many customer service questions can be answered directly on the platform in which they are asked: operational hours, availability of a particular product, and whether or not a service is being offered. If the question can be answered thoroughly and concisely without additional information from the client, respond directly on the platform. Clients see the professional as the expert and are seeking their advice, but too many details can make the professional's response muddled and confusing.

However, the professional will run into issues that are better resolved in private messages or offline. These issues include anything that requires getting more information from the client, such as questions about which products they should be using to issues that would better be resolved over the phone, like a complaint about negative results from a service. When these issues come up, the professional can send the client a private message on the platform on which they reached out to them, or can ask the client for their contact information so the professional can reach out to them directly about the issue. Either way, be sure to acknowledge the action they are taking publically so others will see that they responded to the issue. For example: "Hi Katie. We are sorry to hear about your experience – that is definitely not typical. We would like to get some additional information from you so we can help resolve the issue. Look out for a private message from us. Thanks." The professional can also say, "Hi Katie. Thank you for your feedback. We'd like to reach out to you directly so we can solve your issue. We've sent you a private message asking for your e-mail address so we can contact you there. Thanks."

Engaging with Positive Feedback
Social media is not all about managing negative customer service complaints. There is plenty of positivity to go around. Clients also love to share what they love about businesses, such as awesome results from services, positive interactions with employees, and overall great experiences with the spa. Just as the professional acknowledges criticism and negative feedback, they should also acknowledge the praise they receive too. If a client leaves a comment thanking their aesthetician for their latest treatment, reply with, "Thanks for coming in! We always love to see you!" If a client shares a picture of their clear skin thanks to a series of treatments and homecare products, like the picture and leave a comment thanking them for sharing and telling them how wonderful and healthy their skin looks.

Finding Your Voice
Social media should be used as an extension of the professional's brand, be it large or small, so do not lose sight of the spa's voice. When posting or engaging with clients, channel the brand through a human voice; be relaxed, but professional. Customize responses like the client is being spoken to face-to-face. Using a familiar voice not only strengthens the professional's branding, but also helps clients feel more comfortable and loyal.

Surprise and Delight
While responding to clients on social platforms is very important, professionals also have the opportunity to give those clients who take the extra time to talk to them online something extra. This surprise will make clients feel special and encourage them to continue engaging with the professional on social media. For example, if one of the clients shares a picture on the spa's Facebook page after every chemical peel to show the professional, and all of her social media followers, her glowing results, the professional might consider giving her a free product when she comes in for her next treatment. The professional can comment on the post telling her that, as a thank you, something special is waiting for her the next time she comes in, so not only she sees that she is getting something, but others do as well, which also encourages them to post.


THE LOGISTICS: HOW TO MONITOR AND RESPONDpic-3
While the main principles of social media customer service apply to all platforms, the specific tactics of monitoring and responding vary by channel.

Facebook
There are multiple ways clients may communicate with the professional on Facebook. Clients may leave a comment or image directly on the spa's wall or they may send a private message. The professional can easily monitor both avenues directly on Facebook. When the professional is logged into their business page, they will receive a notification within the Facebook page when someone has posted directly to their wall, when they receive a message, or when someone comments on, likes, or shares one of their posts. The professional can also change their settings to add more users to the business page and receive e-mail or push notifications to the mobile phone.

Once the professional receives a notification, they can respond directly to the comment on their computer or on their mobile device within the Facebook Page Manager mobile application. To make this process easier, the professional can get push notifications to their mobile device to know immediately when someone is interacting with them on Facebook.

Instagram
On Instagram, clients may comment directly on the professional's posts, send them a direct message, or mention them in a picture they are posting. The professional can monitor comments, direct messages, and mentions of their Instagram account directly within the mobile application. Much like Facebook, the professional will receive notifications of all new activity when logged into their account. While the professional cannot post pictures from the website, Instagram does allow them to respond to comments and messages on both the computer and within the mobile application. However, Instagram will only show the professional the most recent notifications, meaning comments and mentions can get buried and lost. Be sure to scroll through the posts to check for recent comments that may have been missed. Outside platforms, such as Iconosquare, are also helpful with tracking engagements on Instagram.

Twitter
Clients may contact the professional on Twitter by responding to a tweet, sending a direct message, or mentioning the professional in a tweet they are sharing. Monitoring Twitter activity within the platform can be difficult because it moves so quickly. When someone engages with the professional directly, the professional will receive a notification in the Notifications tab. Most businesses and brands choose to use a management tool to track their Twitter activity, such as TweetDeck or HootSuite. These platforms allow the professional to not only track all of their notifications in one place, but also track keywords people might be using about their business. This tool comes in handy if someone shares a tweet that includes the name of their business without tagging the business' Twitter handle. The professional can respond to clients directly on the computer, in the mobile application, or from a management tool if they are using one. Both TweetDeck and Hootsuite also have mobile applications, so the professional can respond on their mobile device.

Engaging with clients on social media is well worth the time and commitment to build the brand's presence and connect with clients. Showing clients that the professional cares about any and all feedback makes them feel connected to the professional and the spa, and not only makes them more willing to come back, but also more likely to refer a friend.

kelley-MooreKelley Moore is the digital media manager at PCA SKIN. She has a background working both on and offline with consumer retail brands in multiple industries. With a focus on content development, consumer communication, and customer engagement, she specializes in creating connections between consumers and brands.



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By Jeremy Lawrence | January 18, 2019

Globally, the mature skin category amounts to 25 percent of the skin care market and almost 40 percent of the anti-aging market. People are living longer lives than ever before due to better life expectancies, decreased mortality rates, and declining fertility rates.

Now more than ever, it is important to offer results-oriented skin care for mature skin and focus on all of the factors that contribute to the skin’s aging, including biological aging. Biological aging, also known as intrinsic aging, is the normal aging process that occurs genetically as people grow older. Unlike extrinsic aging, which is accumulative and can be fought with preventative measures, intrinsic aging is unavoidable. The symptoms of intrinsic aging tend to manifest in the 50s and 60s which, for women, links closely to going through menopause.
Menopause is the ending of a woman’s reproductive period and is physiologically defined by the lack of a menstrual cycle for at least 12 months. During the time prior to menopause and during menopause, there are various hormonal changes and declines occurring throughout the woman’s body. Hormones are chemical messengers that stimulate specific functions of organs, tissues, and cells in the body; they regulate growth, metabolism, reproduction, and a variety of other processes. Hormones affect both the internal body and the skin, which is the body’s largest organ. For women, the changes in estrogen levels and other hormones (like progesterone) that are brought on by menopause significantly impact the skin’s aging process. Menopause hastens the skin’s aging at the cellular level. 
Due to these changes, menopausal skin requires expert care that addresses the aging process of the cells themselves, as well as how this manifests itself on the skin. In essence, all layers of the skin, including the cells, need to be addressed.

MENOPAUSE AND THE SKIN
Estrogen is produced by the ovaries, adrenal glands, and fat tissue. While it is often thought to be a female-specific hormone, both women and men produce estrogen. Estrogen is also the blanket term used to describe a group of chemically-similar hormones; therefore, estrogen is not a single hormone but a set of hormones. For example, estradiol (which is the most abundant during reproductive years), estriol (which is prevalent during pregnancy), and estrone (which is prevalent during menopause) are all considered estrogens.
Estrogen plays many crucial roles biologically besides reproduction. It is involved in bone formation, impacts capillary health and circulation, stimulates fat deposits, and is involved in protein synthesis (like collagen and elastin), the production of glycosaminoglycans, and helps regulate melanin and oil production. Plummeting estrogen levels will also impact the skin’s vascular network as capillaries harden (sclerose) and succumb to glycation. All in all, estrogen helps keep the body and skin youthful. Changing and declining levels of estrogen impact the skin’s capacity to function optimally and accelerates the aging process. Signs and symptoms of aging will be both superficial and deep as cellular function is impaired and all layers of the skin are affected.

Untitled-2

A CLOSER LOOK AT CELLS
Humans are made up of a juxtaposition of billions of cells. The cell functions like a living being: it is born, it grows, it proliferates, and it dies. Life starts out as a single cell that is divided into two and then four and so on until adulthood. It breathes and nourishes itself with nutrients, allowing it to produce the energy that is crucial for it to function. Cellular energy, also known as adenosine triphosphate (ATP), keeps everything going. ATP is synthesized because it is needed and used almost immediately; there is a constant cycle of producing and consuming. As people age, ATP production diminishes, leading to cells that function more slowly because there is less energy.
Cells have many organelles, each with a different function. One of these organelles includes the nucleus, the home of the chromosomes. Chromosomes are composed of DNA molecules and proteins and are capped at the end with telomeres. These endcaps prevent chromosomes from weakening, unraveling, and fusing together. A telomere is often compared to the plastic end of a shoelace. Every time a cell divides, the telomeres become shorter; when the cell becomes too short, it either dies or retains genetic damage that can lead to mutations or cancer. Shortened telomeres have been associated with cardiovascular disease, cancer, and diabetes. Longer telomeres are linked to overall healthy living and longevity. As people age, the risk factors increase due to a weakened immune system and naturally-decreased cell division. Daily activities like sun exposure, oxidative stress, and glycation play a big role by damaging DNA within the cells.
Skin cells divide and grow in the basement membrane. From there, new cells are pushed up into the epidermis. Once they are in the epidermis, cells no longer receive nutrients. They start to begin the process of dying and shedding off to be replaced by more new cells.
Keratinocytes are most common among skin cells; they account for around 95 percent of the skin. The primary function of these cells is to create the barrier from the world. These cells are found in the basal layer of the stratified epithelium that comprises the epidermis. Keratinocytes are responsible for forming tight junctions with the nerves of the skin. The skin is the first line of defense and keratinocytes serve as a barrier between an organism and its environment. In addition, these cells prevent the loss of moisture, heat, and other important constituents of the body.
Cells are complex and have many different organelles and functions. In order to optimize the fight against aging, all aspects, not just some, of why cellular function decreases need to be addressed or professionals will yield subpar results.

ADDRESS AGING AT THE CELLULAR LEVEL
Increasing longevity, communication, defense potential, oxygenation, and energy within cells boosting cellular function will highly benefit menopausal skin and help combat intrinsic aging.

Longevity
All skin cells are constantly dividing and telomeres play a role in cell division. Studies show that people can act on a cell’s life span by protecting the genetic material of the cell, the telomeres and chromosomes. Baicalin protects telomeres and lipoamino acids boost protein synthesis that protects the cells. Together, these ingredients increase cellular longevity.

Communication
Cells receive and give information within themselves and their environment. Their life depends on receiving and processing information from the outside environment, including access to nutrients, variations in light levels, and/or temperature changes. Cells can also communicate between each other to synchronize and work like a team. With age, the cell membranes become damaged, causing a dysfunction in cellular communication. As a result, the body does not respond well and the skin repairs itself less efficiently. Lipoamino acids restore clear communication between cells.

Defense Potential
The skin is exposed to imbalances coming from hormonal changes, like menopause, oxidative stress from free radicals, and sun exposure. These factors lead to aging skin. While Langerhans cells play a prominent role in protecting the skin, their numbers decrease over the years. Lipoamino acids protect Langerhans cells and reinforce the defense potential of the skin.

Oxygenation
A supply of oxygen is crucial for cells to produce the energy required for their metabolic needs. Oxygen is a powerful detoxifier; when there is a lack of oxygen in the cells, toxins begin to damage skin functions and deplete the body of energy. Garden nasturtium extract facilitates the transportation and diffusion of oxygen for healthy microcirculation.

Untitled-3Energy
Cells, like humans, need energy to sustain growth, metabolism, and reproduction. The body’s energy currency, ATP, is produced from food molecules like proteins, carbohydrates, and fats in the mitochondrion. ATP diminishes with age and causes the body to function more slowly. As a result, the appearance of wrinkles, loss of firmness, and dullness of complexion is accelerated. D-ribose accelerates the production of ATP.
When skin cells have increased functionality, the skin is healthier and acts younger; healthy cells produce healthy skin. They also allow the actives in skin care products to be better utilized by the skin, maximizing their effectiveness.

TREAT CHANGES TO ALL LAYERS OF THE SKIN
As a result of menopause, the skin becomes more thin, rough, and loose; wrinkles are more visible and dark spots appear. Therefore, mature clients have a bevy of skin care concerns and require global care. In order to provide optimum results, all layers of the skin must be addressed so that cellular function can
be addressed.

Epidermis
In the epidermis, dryness is a result of a reduction in oil production while dehydration indicates increased transepidermal water loss. Impaired barrier function and repair implies that the skin is compromised and less able to defend itself. In this layer of the skin, roughness is indicative of prolonged cell turnover. Pigmentation or a lack of radiance means that there is less regulation of melanin production while dullness or poor coloring implies that microcirculation is impaired, As the result, dermoepidermal junction hardens.

Dermis
In the dermis, deep dehydration means that less hyaluronic acid is being produced. Elastin production has decreased when lines and wrinkles deepen and collagen production has decreased when a lack of firmness and contour is seen.

Increasing cellular functions and providing a potent and comprehensive solution to the epidermis, dermoepidermal junction, and dermis can slow down the natural bio-chemical processes that occur with hormonally-compromised skin.


Katherine-Tomasso 2016Katherine Tomasso has spent over 20 years in the skin care and wellness industry. She brings a unique and innovative perspective and enjoys being part of the ever-changing face of the spa industry. As National Director of Education for YON-KA® Paris, Tomasso’s responsibilities include the development and implementation of YON-KA’s national educational programs. Tomasso has had a number of articles published in notable cosmetic and related prestige publications and is a frequent writer, collaborator, and lecturer within the industry.



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By Jeremy Lawrence | January 18, 2019

As Americans of the 21st century, we sometimes beat ourselves up for our youth-obsession. More traditional cultures, we remind ourselves, honor elders. We berate ourselves for being shallow and vain as we fret over the evidence of the passing years.
But, really… even the Confucian sages of ancient China were full of praise for the “Yin” of very young women, commenting that this essential quality dissipated quickly as the woman moved out of her teens; and so on. The fact is, the only people who ever want to look older are tweens and teens, who just want to hang out in cool nightclubs and other places grown-ups go.

Young skin is defined by its health. While it is possible for young skin to be affected by disorders such as acne, eczema and rosacea, clients generally characterize young skin as healthy skin, when cell turnover is at its peak, and the skin’s naturally taut surface snaps back into place like a new pair of Spanx, thanks to robust, intact collagen and elastin.
The fact is that all of this begins to change early in life. When the results become immediately visible it varies from individual to individual. Age-related skin changes are the result of two things: Our genetic blueprint encoded in our DNA (intrinsic factors) as well as environmental wear-and-tear (extrinsic factors).
How much of it is heredity, and how much is lifestyle? Both aspects must factor into the creation of a proactive, preventive skin health program. One immediate difference is that, unless the client undergoes exhaustive DNA testing, it is impossible to know very much about the body’s intrinsic programming. Typically, we only have direct experience with one or two prior generations (mother, grandmother), but the genetic material of which we are composed dates from centuries earlier. So, our full genetic “recipe” and its inherited predispositions remain a mystery.
By contrast, we can address the here and now, specifically how we treat our skin and our bodies. We can also examine and assess our environment in order to evaluate how the external world will impact us.
Experts concur that at least 90 percent of what we interpret as visible skin aging, such as fine lines, loss of contour and hyperpigmentation, is extrinsic, specifically linked to free radical damage, with UV or photoaging heading the list. Our innate genetic material dictates how well we handle the assault of sun-damage, as well as other damage inflicted by cigarette smoke and other external stressors. For instance, a major player in the condition of every woman’s skin is estrogen. The approach of menopause, as well as other hormonal shifts, may produce visible effects in the skin, regardless of sun-exposure or other external factors.
This duality confuses many clients, especially when it comes to lifestyle choices. For this reason, early education about skin health is a key part of every skin therapist’s mission. Engaging the client in a partnership to keep skin at its healthiest by definition also will help to delay “pulling the trigger” on the cascade of processes which lead to skin aging.

The New Enemy: Sugar
This time, it is not about brownies, cupcakes or an uncontrollable sweet-tooth. One of the major recent research breakthroughs regarding skin aging has to do with sugar or glycation. We now know that collagen and elastin proteins are highly susceptible to an internal chemical reaction within the body. The same glucose that provides energy for our cells can react with proteins, such as collagen, resulting in the formation of Advanced Glycation End-products (AGEs) and free radicals (ROS). This contributes to cross-linking of protein fibers, the loss of elasticity and changes in the dermis. When AGEs form in the skin, they activate a receptor site on cells and form a complex known as Receptor Advanced Glycation End-products (RAGE) that signals cellular processes related to inflammation and subsequent disease. Coupled with this are two additional biochemical reactions in the skin:sugar

  • The formation of Reactive Oxygen Species (ROS)
  • The activation of Matrix Metalloproteinase enzymes (MMPs)

ROS include oxygen ions, free radicals and peroxides. They are generally very small molecules and are highly reactive due to the presence of unpaired electrons. ROS form as a natural byproduct of the normal metabolism of oxygen. During times of environmental stress, ROS levels can increase dramatically, causing significant damage to cell structures. This is known as oxidative stress, which is the major cause of degenerative disorders including aging and disease.
Matrix degrading MMPs are enzymes that when activated, control matrix degradation in the dermis. Each MMP is specific for particular collagens or other proteins in the extracellular matrix of the dermis. Within hours of UV exposure the MMP genes are activated resulting in biosynthesis of collagenase and other MMPs. Because collagenase degrades collagen (and inhibits formation of new collagen), long term elevation results in disorganized and clumped collagen which is characteristic of photoaged skin. All of these biochemical reactions contribute to the cross-linking of protein fibers in the skin, which translates as skin degradation and loss of structural integrity. The visible result of this cross-linking is the clumping, thickened, “ropy” effect we often observe in aged skin, especially skin which has been subjected to sun, cigarette-smoke and other forms of oxidative stress.
These reactions, formations and visible results are linked with inflammation, which now is recognized as the enemy of overall health in virtually every physiological system. Again, simply put, inflammation is the catalyst behind what we know as the aging process, in the skin and throughout the body. The key to healthier skin which retains the resiliency of youth is to “trap” or arrest these biochemicals and quench them before they damage collagen and other tissues.

Managing These Biochemical Reactions
Our bodies are designed to fight free radical damage intrinsically. However, the fact is that modern industrial life places our defense systems on “overload.” Also, we are living longer than past generations, so our natural defensive reserves may be depleted well before our lives end. These facts require support and supplementation, including topically applied products.exfoliation

Ingredients Demonstrated to fight MMPs, AGEs and ROS:

  • Dipotassium glycyrrhizate (licorice)
  • Genestein
  • Glucosamine
  • Argine/Lysine polypeptide
  • Palmitoyl tripeptide-5
  • Retinol, retinyl palmitate (vitamin A)
  • Ascorbic acid, magnesium ascorbyl phosphate (vitamin C)
  • Tocopheryl acetate (vitamin E)
  • Linoleic acid (vitamin F)
  • Bioflavinoids:
  • Proanthocyanidins from grape seed extract
  • Polyphenols from green and white tea
  • Soy phytoestrogens
  • Beta-Glucan

soft-skinSearch out these types of ingredients when considering age-fighting skin products for your business. Visible results that address the signs of aging are what your client seeks and you need to be fully confident in what formulas can get those results, both at home and in the treatment room.

Putting Oxidation, Inflammation and Aging Under “House Arrest”
The treatment room can be the true tipping-point for an informed, effective skin care program which arrests the oxidation and inflammation of aging. While statistics do indicate that fewer than 7 percent of Americans have regular skin care treatments, work with your team members to create a strategy which raises this number.
Begin by offering short, intensive treatments which focus upon one aspect of reducing visible aging, such as flash exfoliation. A 20-minute resurfacing and brightening treatment, utilizing hydroxy acids to remove dulling surface debris which accumulate more densely as we age as the result of slower cell-turnover, will open clients’ eyes to the power of topical skin therapy.
Create a no-pressure sampling area or skin bar where clients can gain tips on how to use skin products while trying them on their own skin through a guided skin lesson; and send them home with trial sizes to experience results and pique their interest.
Exfoliation which can be customized and calibrated in strength to the client’s skin needs is key. The latest formulas combine a cocktail of multi-action exfoliation components like retinol, hydroxy acids, peptides, mineral powders and protease enzymes in soothing olive and chamomile bases. These deliver desired results while averting unnecessary skin irritation.
Various technologies will help deliver the benefits of the “A list” ingredients more rapidly and more effectively into the skin to expedite results. Electrical modalities like ultrasonic, iontophoresis, microcurrent and indirect high frequency may prove indispensable in delivering the degree of visible improvement needed to encourage your clients to book and rebook.
When discussing the use of ultrasonic in skin care, we are of course referring to therapeutic ultrasound as opposed to diagnostic. In addition to ultrasonic (especially blades) being a deep cleansing treatment and allowing for the release of dead surface skin cells and loosening of comedones, sonophoresis or phonophoresis uses ultrasound energy in order to enhance the skin penetration of active substances through a process that creates gaps in the lipid component of the skin. Use during your treatment protocol with cleansers, serums, complexes and gel masks.
Galvanic iontophoresis or ionization is a process where galvanic current is used on the positive polarity to pass active substances through the intact skin where, once penetrated, they remain working. Use with serums, complexes, gel and water based masks and moisturizers.
Indirect high frequency is the use of the high frequency current to aid in product penetration and skin stimulation. It is ideal for a skin that needs stimulation, such as a dry or lackluster skin, but that may be contraindicated to a European style massage. Use with oil-based massage creams.
Microcurrent machines have dual usage in a professional treatment as a tool for muscle re-education to firm the skin and to increase cell energy levels and for specific iontophoresis, that allows for the penetration of active ingredients to the deeper layers of the epidermis.  Use with toners, serums, complexes, gel and water-based masks and moisturizers.
Professional treatments and preventive home care are just part of the overall picture. As mentioned earlier, inflammation now is identified as the root-cause of many conditions and syndromes associated with aging, including Alzheimer’s. Preventing and reversing inflammation goes more than skin-deep; it is an overall lifestyle approach.
Massage, stress-reduction, diet, nutrition (including supplements), activity, exercise and perhaps most importantly a feeling of engagement and community matter in every phase of life. But the choices in these areas become more critical as we age, since the metabolism has naturally begun to slow, and we cannot recover from blows as easily as we once did. Certainly there is more to the equation than drinking enough water and shielding our skin from those killer rays.
When developing a regimen for skin, which stays in prime shape regardless of how many candles blaze on the birthday cake, begin with those factors over which we have some control. Explore the intrinsic factors, through a comprehensive examination and analysis. Then build a program based upon this knowledge and the evidence collected through the extrinsic record, which is the skin itself.
Most importantly, check the time. The needs of the skin are always changing, and we owe it to our clients to move with them through the seasons, cycles and their new array of demands and opportunities. In this way, advanced skin care challenges past perceptions of age, making healthy skin a timeless objective.

annet king-hsA unique understanding of the global skin care market combined with dynamic leadership skills make Annet King an invaluable asset to The International Dermal Institute. King develops, writes, presents, and monitors the success of all classes which comprise the IDI curriculum. King is both CIDESCO, ITEC, and CIBTAC-certified, placing her in the uppermost echelon of world-class skin care professionals. She is regularly sought as a source by journalists to comment on skin care issues, and is a frequent contributor to magazines, websites, and blogs on the subject of creating and operating a successful skin care business, as well as the specific science and art of skin and body care. King currently resides in Los Angeles and works at the IDI headquarters located in Carson, Calif.



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By | January 18, 2019

The 21st century has presented us with skin conditions that reflect challenging times. Practicing aestheticians are caring for skin conditions that are far more complex than oily, dry, and combination.
Physical, chemical, and biological application has reduced skin flora and vitality. The reduction in skin depth has eroded, alternating the skin’s ecology. The excessive treatment of skin has depleted nutrients, reduced skin’s ability to regenerate, increased temperature, discharge, and surface crusting.
Nutritional value of skin care is not just declining, but collapsing. Skin care products are chemically bloated.

While some companies make products that are safe to eat, other companies choose to use known human carcinogens or developmental toxins. Nearly all these chemicals can penetrate the skin, and some we ingest directly from our lips or hands. More than one-third of all personal care products contain at least one ingredient linked to cancer.

According to the Environmental Protection Agency, children receive 50 percent of their lifetime cancer risks in the first two years of life! The EPA warns that chemicals are up to 10 times more toxic to children than adults, precisely because: “Children’s internal organs are still developing and maturing and their enzymatic, metabolic, and immune systems may provide less natural protection than those of an adult. There are ‘critical periods’ in human development when exposure to a toxin can permanently alter the way an individual’s biological system operates.”
DEET can be found in over 230 different products such as deodorants, soaps, makeup, and sunscreens. DEET sprays can melt plastic. Duke University Medical Center Pharmacologist discovered that prolonged exposure could impair cell function in parts of the brain.
The accumulation of the following chemicals has a detrimental effect on the whole body. A few of these materials include:

  1. Mineral oil, paraffin, and petrolatum are petroleum-based products that coat the skin like plastic, clog pores, create a build-up of toxins, and lead to various dermatologic issues.
  2. Parabens are preservatives that mimic estrogen and disrupt the endocrine system, leading to cell malformation and all forms of acne.
  3. Propylene glycol may cause dermatitis, kidney, or liver abnormalities, inhibit skin cell growth, or cause skin irritation.

Affect Skin Management
Implementation of better skin management practices needs to be acknowledged and regarded as a health issue. Effective skin management is to anticipate the possibilities of skin breakdown and to initiate risk factor, prevention, protection, supplementation, and care.

Risk Factors
Internally sugar is the greatest enemy. Sugar increases insulin, which directly influences the production of oil and growth of the follicular canal whereby oil is transported to the surface of the skin. Sugar causes inflammation, which injures capillaries, thus leading to cell starvation. Cancer loves sugar! Any free radical agents such as smoking, over exposure to sun, and over use of alcohol and medications are detrimental to overall health including skin.
Externally chemical agents and peels weaken capillaries. Increased inflammation deteriorates the skin’s barriers, making it more susceptible to sun damage leading to skin cancers. Degraded skin is more permeable, thus leading to quicker and deeper penetration of toxins.

Prevention and Protections
Skin is the cream that rises to the top. What goes in, physically or emotionally, will eventually make its way to the surface. How to prevent break down to the skin as we age?

  1. Chemical-Free Sun Protection and clothing
  2. Use antioxidants.
  3. Avoid chemical-based skin care products.
  4. Avoid peeling skin if it is unnecessary.
  5. Find joy in your life. Release negative emotions.
  6. Do something silly at least once a day.
  7. Incorporate healthy eating habits and get adequate sleep and rest.

Supplementation and Care
Minerals play an important role in the health of your body in terms of healthy skin, bones, teeth, hair, nails, nerve and muscle activity, and regulation of body fluids. Minerals are required for the body to utilize vitamins. Our bodies can live longer without vitamins than they can with a deficit of minerals. Without minerals your body could not repair damaged cells and tissue. The lack of just one trace mineral could create a multitude of skin problems. The theory that there is a greater risk for certain types of skin cancer in someone who suffers from sub-optimal levels of certain minerals in the body or a deficiency in some trace element like selenium is being increasingly supported by evidence garnered from various clinical studies done on human subjects.
Essential fatty acids (EFA), which are lipids and proteins, are also an integral part of a cell’s protection and are necessary for supplementation and care. EFAs reduce inflammation and repair injured cells.

Minerals – Herbs – Clay – Salts
Minerals can be found in several skin care ingredients such as herbs, clay and salts.
Herbs, especially the weedy ones, are minerals powerhouses. Minerals from plants have been predigested by the plants root and are known as water-soluble, hydrophilic (organic) minerals. Hydrophilic minerals are thought to be 99 percent absorbable and most beneficial to the skin.
Zinc: This mineral promotes growth, accelerates healing, regulates oil glands, and promotes healthy immune system. Herbal Sources: Alfalfa, burdock root, chamomile, chickweed, dandelion, fennel seed, mullein, nettle, and rose hips
Magnesium: This mineral supports the integrality of cell structure, strengthens the blood vessels, and prevents hair loss. It is responsible for muscle contraction and nerve impulse. Herbal Sources: Alfalfa, chamomile, chickweed, dandelion, fennel, lemongrass, licorice, mullein, nettle, oat straw, peppermint, raspberry leaf.
Iron: This mineral is essential for metabolism and oxygenation of skin cells. Herbal Sources: Alfalfa, burdock root, catnip, cayenne, chamomile, chickweed, chicory, dandelion, fennel seed, lemongrass, licorice, mullein, nettle, oat straw, peppermint, rose hips.
Calcium: This mineral builds and protects bones and teeth and maintains the integrity of cell structure. It is responsible for muscle contraction and nerve impulse. Herbal Sources: Alfalfa, burdock root, chamomile, chickweed, chicory, dandelion, fennel seed, lemongrass, mullein, nettle, oat straw, peppermint, raspberry leaf, rose hips, violet leaves, yarrow.

Minerals in Salts
Himalayan pink salt has a rich mineral content that includes over 84 minerals and trace elements such as: calcium, magnesium, potassium, copper, and iron. This salt is recognized for its high mineral content and therapeutic properties. Regular use of Himalayan pink salt provides essential minerals, trace elements, supports proper nutrient absorption, eliminates toxins, balances the skin’s pH, and increases circulation of lymph and blood.

Minerals in Clays
Indigenous people as an important medicinal and cosmetic tool have used clay around the world for centuries. Recently, medical research has emerged that supports the efficacy of clay, and it is now becoming increasingly popular as a rediscovered treatment for many different health and skin care conditions. Revered for its ability to stimulate blood and lymph circulation, remove dead skin cells, absorb impurities and fats, and tone and strengthen connective tissues. Externally, clays are used to absorb excess oil, dirt, and toxins from the skin while simultaneously exfoliating and improving skin circulation. They are a rich mineral source that aids skin nutritionally.
Minerals should come from pure sources. There are a lot of genetically modified herbs that claim they have the same effect on the skin and the body as pure plant material. Genetically engineered organism (GEO) is an organism whose genetic material has been altered using genetic engineering techniques. These organism are false representation of the pure plant and mineral source and should be avoided.
Using products that have ingredients that are organically grown and that come directly from the earth are the safest and purist ingredients to use on your skin.

References:
Mineral in Bibliography: Bergner, Paul, The Healing Power of Minerals, Prima, Rocklin CA, 1997Clays

Anne Willis has been part of the aesthetic industry for more than 30 years. She offers premier educational programs and customized training to schools and spas and is CEO of De La Terre Skincare. Her programs are taught throughout the country delivering innovative solutions and quality support. The highest standard for education insures maximum success for your staff and the facility. 828-230-5125, info@annecwillis.com, www.anncwillis.com

 



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By | January 18, 2019

When most people hear the term “spa,” the words that come to mind are more often than not, luxury and pampering. Little is known of the history of spa. And certainly, the spa and beauty industries have tended to cater to a more affluent clientele where luxury is expected and commonplace.
But in a climate where economic, political, and ecological realities are no longer seeming certainties, it would seem that spas are changing and the demographic of who they are trying to cater to more inclusive.

Once again, returning to their original purpose; becoming “green,” which actually means nothing more than trying to operate and offer that which is in keeping with and sustains nature, and thus become sanctuaries for releasing stress and tension and becoming revitalized and rejuvenated. Of course, these have always been promised goals of a day or destination spa visit. But, it would seem that clients are more knowledgeable and insistent upon these goals and as a result, to accomplish these tasks most effectively, there has been a positive trend to include on spa menus the bodywork, sensibility, and education of more holistically oriented therapies from around the world. Of course, everyone would like a bit of pampering. But, without a doubt, this by-product of a stellar spa service must be a part of the far greater gift to your client of being capable of leaving your facility and back out into the world with new skills, a clear head, and open heart to make their life more productive, meaningful, and beneficial for everyone they come into contact with during the day. 
To accomplish this task, more and more spas are including forms of nutritional counseling, yoga, relaxation therapy, and meditation to their menus; body and mind techniques that clients can continue to practice when at home. In fact, my wife Melanie and I believe that this trend – where spas educate their clients to take the benefits, lessons, and skills back out into the world is absolutely an essential ingredient for successful, useful spas of the 21st century. We have coined the term “Spa Without Walls” as this next important step.
In the “Spa Without Walls” model, a key ingredient is supporting your client in awakening new potentials by transforming how they work with their own minds. For in Ayurveda, the science of health and longevity that we teach, mind always precedes body. The negative habit patterns of our mind that make us proud, arrogant, angry, miserly, fearful, or confused or the positive mental habit patterns of generosity, patience, discipline, inclusiveness, certainty, and compassion are mirrored in our body and the world around us. And, if we are really honest with ourselves, we all know this to be true.
Transforming our mental patterns is no easy task. Often times, this is accomplished when we are faced with a traumatic event in our lives. Then again, how often have we seen in ourselves that once everything gets back to normal, we backslide into our old ways of doing things? That is why in the East techniques of meditation are emphasized as a means to stabilize positive states of mind, which in turn support positive actions, a more joyful life, and so on.
However, meditation is not always something that a client is either open or educated about or confident in seeing the benefits from. That is where some of the more subtle treatments of Ayurveda can be of great benefit to them, hence a real plus on your spa menu. The practices in Ayurveda that can give a client the experience of a more expanded, relaxed, and clear-minded state have as their focus what in Sanskrit are known as “chakras.”
In Ayurveda and all of the health and spiritual disciplines of the East, there is a recognition of an energy that infuses the body that is beyond sheer matter. This is not all that different from the western notion of a soul, although this notion of a soul or spirit is interpreted in different ways and hotly contested in virtually all world religions. Probably the most significant difference between the Eastern and Western views is that like the anatomy and physiology of our physical body, Ayurveda and other Eastern disciplines see the spiritual energy infusing the body in a matrix or network not unlike our physical nervous system. There are pathways (nadis), plexi, or large junctions of these pathways – energy vortices or wheels (the chakra actually means wheel), and the energy (prana) that pulsates through that matrix. And, just as we can stimulate, massage, or exercise a given part of our body for certain physical benefits, it is possible to stimulate, massage, or meditate upon a certain chakra or energy vortex and affect our mind and mental/emotional patterns.
The practice of Shirodhara, where a fine stream of warm oil is played upon the forehead, the site of the “third eye” or ajna chakra, is actually an Ayurvedic chakra treatment. According to the theory of chakras and their subtle energy matrix, we have three primary invisible channels through which prana or life force flows. Two channels go from our nostrils and wrap around a central channel that is anterior to our spine. Where the two side (from the nostril) channels constrict, the central channel is where you will find the chakras. At a physical level, the chakras are located where we have the major glands of our endocrine system. And there is an inter-dependence between our chakra health and our glandular health. But, this cannot be discussed here.
At a physical level, the warm oil of Shirodhara facilitates the release of serotonin, the chemical that creates that wonderful sensation of deep relaxation. But people receiving Shirodhara often notice a more subtle, powerful shift. They have deeper insights, greater mental clarity, and a heightened sense of all the sense and perception. Some even have spiritual epiphanies. The reason for this has to do with the loosening of the side channels around the central channel at the third-eye or ajna chakra. More spiritual/subtle energy is flowing. This is why Tibetans call Shirodhara “psycho-spiritual” massage and encourage it being administered to those who are entering into meditation retreats.
In Ayurveda and in the Tibetan meditative traditions, there are other, less elaborate or “messy” ways to arouse the energy of the chakras for positive physical, emotional, and spiritual benefits. And in the spa setting, rather than embarking on a lengthy full service such as Shirodhara, one can do a simple 15 to 20 minute add-on service using specific oils on the chakras and then laying semi-precious stones over the chakra areas.

The Protocol:
From our research, study, and practice with Indian and Tibetan doctors and spiritual masters, we recommend the following oils and stones for doing a simple chakra add-on that will take whatever work you have been doing on your client to a deeper, more satisfying level. Like Shirodhara, we recommend that you do the following protocol at the very end of the session and do nothing else while the stones are on the body. What is offered here is an abridged version of our more extensive Tibetan Chakra Stone Ritual.
While there are seven chakras traditionally described, the Tibetans say that only five need to be addressed. First, palpate the following points and as you do so, note if they feel sharp (PITTA), dull (KAPHA), or somewhat painful, but changeable (VATA) in their sensation. Also, here I am describing the element, emotions, and potentials to which these chakra points are below:

1. The Sacral Chakra, at the sacral plexus, about three finger-widths below the navel. This center is associated with the Element of Water and is associated with guilt and the right to feel. The antidote to such feelings comes from the capacity to develop the wisdom to transform the neurotic emotion of jealousy. As we transform our jealousy, the chakra allows us to experience what in the Tibetan tradition is called “all-accomplishing” wisdom. We develop greater power and resourcefulness free
of competitiveness.
2. The Navel Center - located at our physical solar plexus, midways between the bottom of our sternum and above our navel. This chakra is associated with the Element of Fire and the feelings of shame and the right to act. The antidote to such feelings comes from the wisdom in transforming the neurotic emotion of pride. As we transform pride, we access “equanimitous” wisdom. We have a much greater sense of fairness and justice free of partisanship. It opens us to our altruism.
3. The Heart Center - associated with the Element of Air and the feelings of sorrow and the right to love and be loved. The antidote to such feelings comes from the wisdom in transforming the neurotic emotion of anger and hatred. As we transform these two most toxic of our emotions, we access a “mirror-like” wisdom. You become more relaxed, open, and clear-headed in seeing things as
they are.
4. The Throat Center - located above the sternum and below the Adams Apple. This chakra is associated with the Element of Ether and the feelings of lies and the right to speak and hear truth. The antidote to such feelings comes from the wisdom in transforming the neurotic emotion of desire. As we transform desire, we access “discriminating” wisdom. Our judgment improves and we know where and how to offer our love and concern. Our compassion becomes more skillful and we are less likely to be duped.
5. The Third Eye Center - located slightly above the meeting of our two eyebrows. The Third Eye Chakra is associated with illusion and the right to see. The antidote to such feelings comes from the wisdom in transforming the neurotic emotion of ignorance or confusion. This is sometimes the result of just plain not understanding, but is also associated with willfully ignoring. As one begins to transform ignorance, ignoring, and confusion, one accesses greater levels of a wisdom that is described as “all-pervasive.” In our awakened state, we have our pulse on and feel intimately connected with the universe itself.

After you palpate each area and note its sensitivity, use the following oils and a lapis lazuli egg or smooth stone to massage each chakra area, starting from the Sacral chakra, moving your way up…

1. If sharp in sensation, apply sunflower or safflower oil. This oil can be infused with eucalyptus if you wish. With a cool lapis stone, massage gently in a clockwise circle around the chakra point for at least 21 times.
2. If the point is dull, apply almond oil. It becomes even more effective if it is infused with ginger. Use
a more rapid, jostling stimulation to the chakra point.
3. If the point is neither sharp, nor dull, but variable, use sesame oil. Infuse the oil with bay laurel if possible. Slowly and deeply massage the point with the stone, again 21 times in a clockwise direction.

After you have applied oil and massaged all of the points, then take the following semi-precious stones and place them on the chakra points in the following order. Note that the choice of stones is based on a Tibetan understanding and will thus be different from what you may have read in yoga books or magazines.

  • Ajna Chakra (third eye) – white howlite
  • Heart Chakra – lapis lazuli
  • Navel Chakra (at solar plexus) – yellow jasper
  • Throat Chakra – red jasper
  • Sacral Chakra (below the navel) – malachite

Allow the stones to sit directly on your client’s skin for seven to 10 minutes. While this is happening, we like to play Tibet bell music. But, there are any number of beautiful chakra CDs from which to choose.
After the allotted time, remove the stones in the reverse order and give the client another minute or two to come to and prepare to re-enter their world.
This simple, 20 minute add-on can yield profound results. Easy to do, you may even want try it on yourself to get a sense as to what your clients may experience when you offer it to them. At the end of the day, take off your work clothes, lie down, palpate the points, add the oils and the stones, and experience your own chakra journey.

With an educational background and training that is as conventional as it is ‘alternative,’ Robert Sachs is a Licensed Clinical Social Worker, a licensed massage therapist, yoga instructor, and has been a student of Indian and Tibetan spiritual and healing traditions since the early 70s. Along with his wife, Melanie, Robert runs Diamond Way Ayurveda, the foremost promoters of Ayurveda in the spa and beauty industries. Robert and Melanie live in San Luis Obispo, Calif. They have three children, Kai Ling, Harriet Christina, and Jabeth David-Francis. 866-303-3321



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By Jeremy Lawrence | January 18, 2019

Some aspects of aging are out of our control and we should learn to accept these changes with grace. The plain fact is we are all going to get old, at least I hope so. As we strive for health and longevity we should consider not how long we live, but the quality of our lives as we age. I equate aging with vitality and the ability to have mobility. I would much rather be old and walk two miles a day, bike to the park, practice yoga, and have vital energy that drives my passions, than the alternative, which is to be on multiple medications, breathless after walking up stairs and daily suffering from every ache and pain.

When considering skin longevity we need to recalibrate our attitude towards aging. Promises of a flawless complexion are a short-term fix and may increase long-term health problem. Striving for skin that is free of inflammation, lesions, age spots, moles, and skin cancers is not only realistic, but also vital for long-term health.
As medical intervention for reversing aging grows, integrative medical facilities remind us that skin is part of our overall health. Science and research demonstrates that we should explore a holistic approach when striving for an ageless complexion.  

Wear and Tear
The outside world comes in direct contact with our skin and over time adds to its wear and tear. The wear and tear theory was first formulated in 1882 by biologist Dr. August Weissman and suggests that accumulation of damage to cells tissue, and organs overtime eventually wear them out and kill them. This damage begins at the molecular level within the cells. The DNA in our genes sustains repeated damage from toxins, radiation and ultraviolet light. While our body has the capacity to repair DNA damage, not all of the repairs are accurate and complete therefore the damage progressively accumulates. With age the body loses its ability to repair damage leading to visible wrinkles, age spots, and cell starvation.

Other Aging Philosophies

Free Radicals and Hormones
Free radicals attack the skin in several ways. Wounding to the structure of the cell membrane occurs as free radicals try and rob electrons. Once the integrity of this semi-permeable structure is compromised the permeability of toxins is increased, leaching of valuable nutrients within the cell occurs and oxidation to the mitochondria leads to cell death. Damage caused by free radicals creates metabolic waste products, including substances known as Lipofuscins. Lipofuscins are connected to age spots. In addition, free radicals generate enzymes called collagenase that attack collagen and
elastin causing these structures to break down. Repeated exposure to free radicals slows down cell renewal, inhibiting the skin’s ability to repair itself.


Hormones
As we age, the secretion of many hormones declines and their effectiveness is also reduced. There is one exception, cortisol. The stressors of the 21st century are not an occasional event, but an intrinsic part of our lives. We are constantly exposed to both emotional and biological stressors. Cortisol, the hormone responsible for stress regulation, has not only increased in an effort to cope with real life stressors but also increases with age. Increased cortisol levels lead to breakdown of muscle tissue and collagen.

What are skin’s greatest enemies?
When we think in terms of aging skin we should be more focused on pathologies that occur as we age; telangiectasia, reduced immune response, actinic keratosis, capillary fragility, cell starvation, age spots. Internally sugar, wheat, and dairy are the greatest enemies. Sugar increases insulin, which directly influences the production of oil. More oil means excessive bacteria. Increased insulin also means abnormalities to the growth of the follicular canal and the growth of skin cells itself, like skin tags. Sugar causes inflammation, which creates capillaries fragility and causes cells to starve and cancer loves sugar!
The over consumption of wheat is the largest contributor to bacterial and fungal growth, leaky gut syndrome, and universal food allergies.
Products made from cow’s milk have 59 active hormones, scores of allergens, fat, and cholesterol. Most cow's milk has measurable quantities of herbicides, pesticides, dioxins, and over 52 powerful antibiotics. Dairy forms mucus, which is a breading ground for yeast and Candida. Bacteria love moist mucous environments. Dairy should be avoided if one suffers from any skin crisis.
Externally synthetic agents and peels reduce skin’s natural defense, increasing permeability of toxins and UV rays. When skin perceives itself as defenseless it will fight to rebuild its defense mechanisms, sometimes to a fault. The increase of inflammation leads to breakdown of cell structure, capillary fragility and collagen degradation. The development of abnormal pigmentation occurs as skin finds ways to process ultraviolet rays. These abnormalities can lead to skin cancers.
Any free radical agent such as smoking, over exposure to sun, over use of alcohol, and medications are detrimental to overall health including skin.

Good nutrients, great complexion. What nutrients are good for the skin?
What goes in, physical or emotional, will eventually make its way to the skin. Giving skin nutritional support is essential for overall skin health. Minerals play a key role in cell structure and protection. Copper regenerates collagen, phosphorus is responsible for cell structure and repair and zinc supports skin’s immune response. Vitamin A protects against an enzyme that destroys collagen and vitamin B prevents deterioration of collagen. Vitamin C increases collagen synthesis, supports immune response, provides UV protection, and reduces the formation of tumors and cancers.

Essential Fatty Acids and Collagen
Essential Fatty Acids (EFAs) are lipids and proteins, an integral part of the cells’ protective covering. EFAs reduce inflammation and repair injured cells. EFAs leave skin vital and glowing and can be found in most seed oils.
Collagen is the foundation of our skin; however it also supports blood and lymph vessels as well as skin follicles. When collagen becomes injured, the matrix scars, leaving the skin with lines, wrinkles, and large pores. Beyond the physical collapse, deteriorated collagen impairs capillaries inhibiting blood flow, leaving skin cells starved. The end result is skin that is devitalized and aged.

How do we maintain our skin’s longevity for optimal health regardless of age?

  • Here is the best philosophy for vital skin, as we get older.
  • Use the sun constructively. Do not block it with synthetic chemicals.
  • Cleanse your skin twice a day
  • Use loads of antioxidants
  • Avoid synthetic based skin care products
  • Avoid peeling skin if it is unnecessary
  • Condition skin with serums and oils that are rich in vitamins, minerals, and essential fatty acids
  • Find joy in your life. Release negative emotions
  • Do something silly at least once a day
  • Incorporate healthy eating habits and get adequate sleep and rest

The latest skin care product innovations
What is new is actually being rescued from the past. The 21st century is a return to tradition. The expansion of science and technology has done little for us emotionally. The healing therapies established thousands of years ago have been eclipsed by technology and machines and has done little to insure our well-being.
Due to science we have moved beyond skin type and skin condition. Skin conditions that reflect these technologies are on the rise such as rosacea, adult acne, and wounded and deficient skin. It has become necessary to return to formulas that are organic and natural in order for our skin to cope with the onslaught of stress. We can definitely extract much from what we have gained from science, but the true answer lies in nature and tradition.
What can we do to improve the appearance of our skin short of plastic surgery or exotic therapies?
In your 20s skin cells regenerate every 28 days. However, with every additional decade of life you must add 10 days to that cycle. So in your 30s it becomes 38 days, 40s, 48 and so on. There are four factors to keep skin vital and regenerating at a more youthful rate:

  1. Step up exfoliation, which is a process that eliminates dead skin cells at the surface of the skin.
  2. Increase cell regeneration, which can be achieved by using things like roses, hawthorn, and rosehips. These plants contain vitamin C, which stimulates cell regeneration. Vitamin C also increases collagen synthesis and boosts the skin’s immune response.
  3. Use products that stimulate fibroblast. Fibroblast is a cell that produces collagen strands. Botanicals that increase fibroblast are calendula and gotu kola.
  4. Use the health benefits of the sun instead of fearing it, eat a healthy diet, using natural remedies versus medications and finding joy in your self and your life is a winning combination for good health and skin longevity. We are a generation who has many resources at our fingertips. As we strive for health and longevity it is important to use our resources wisely, so we can live healthy productive lives with skin that mirrors our inner vitality and passion.


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By Jeremy Lawrence | January 18, 2019

When the drug review began over 30 years ago, the focus was predominantly on UVB protection or sunburn protection. The recommendation was skin that was unprotected would cause skin cancer and premature aging. So, chemist began formulating sun blocks and sunscreens that touted an SPF (sun protection factor) claiming that by applying these solutions one could stay engaged in outdoor activities longer without damaging the skin. The American Academy of Dermatology and the Skin Cancer Foundation have emphasized the best way to prevent skin cancer was to use sunscreens with a minimum of SPF 15. They also include the recommendation to wear clothing, hats, and sunglasses for added protection.

FDA further mandated that to protect the consumers and to ensure their safety, UVA should be addressed as well. To promote efficacy of products they devised a UVA rating system. It is called the Four-Star System. Under the proposed regulation, a UVA star rating would be prominently displayed on sunscreen labels, near the SPF rating.

The proposed UVA rating system: 

  • One star represent low UVA protection
  • Two stars respresent medium protection
  • Three stars represent high protection
  • Four stars represent the highest UVA protection available in an over-the-counter (OTC)
    sunscreen product.

If a sunscreen product does not rate at least one star, FDA proposed that labeling bear a “no UVA protection” marking on the front label, near the SPF value. FDA also amended its existing 1999 rule to increase the SPF from SPF 30+ to SPF 50+. Previously, FDA had recognized SPF values up to 30+. In addition they are allowing for new combinations of active ingredients. Research released in the 21st century reveals that in hindsight focusing on the effects of UVA and UVB may fall short in protecting the consumer. The use of sunscreen chemicals may be increasing the incidence of cancer and that sunlight exposure may actually decrease human cancer rates and improve your health. In this article, I would like to present a fresh perspective on detection, prevention, and a responsible approach to protect the skin from injury and premature aging, while considering the effects on the whole body and establishing a platform for further investigation.

Chemical Sunscreens and Three Primary Defects

  • They are powerful free radical generators.
  • They often have strong estrogenic activity.
  • They are synthetic chemicals that are alien to the human body and accumulate in body fat stores.

In the 1970s, Howard Maibach warned that up to 35 percent of sunscreen applied to the skin could pass through the skin and enter the bloodstream but this had little effect on sunscreen promotion or safety testing.1 The longer sunscreen chemicals are left on the skin, the greater the absorption into the body.2

Free Radical Generators
It is not that these compounds were ever viewed as benign substances. Organic chemists have been aware of the dangers of compounds in chemical sunscreens for years.
Chemicals are widely used to start free radical reactions during chemical synthesis. For instance Benzophenone is activated by ultraviolet light energy that breaks benzophenone’s double bond to produce two free radical sites. The free radicals then react with other molecules and produce damage to the fats, proteins, and DNA of the cells – the types of damage that produce skin aging and the development
of cancer.
Currently, the FDA approves avobenzone as a safe and effective active ingredient and is one of the suggested UVA blockers. Avobenzone, which is a chemical easily absorbed through the epidermis absorbs ultraviolet radiation energy. Since it cannot destroy this energy, it has to convert the light energy into chemical energy, which is normally released as free radicals.

Other free radical generators:

  • Oxybenzone – powerful free radical generator
  • Dioxybenzone – powerful free radical generator
  • Butyl methoxydibenzoylmethane – Toxic properties

Researchers at Harvard Medical School discovered that psoralen a psoriasis medication, is an ultraviolet light-activated, free radical generator that is chemically similar to sunscreens and is an extremely efficient carcinogen. They found that the rate of squamous cell carcinoma among patients with psoriasis, who had been repeatedly treated with UVA light after a topical application of psoralen, was 83 times higher than among the general population 3

Worldwide, the greatest rise in melanoma has been experienced in countries where chemical sunscreens have been heavily promoted. The rise in melanoma has been exceptionally high in Queensland, Australia, where the medical establishment has vigorously promoted the use of sunscreens. Queensland now has more incidences of melanoma per capita than any other place on earth. 4

Skin’s Natural Defense
Investigation into skin’s natural ability to defend itself reveals startling changes that should be considered when adding synthetics to aid in protection. Skin acts as a durable exterior barrier that provides light protection, prevents bacterial invasion, waterproofing, and protection from abrasion and injury. It is the first line of defense for the body. Within this system of defense lie five mechanisms that provide specific protection.
1st – Sebum – The chemical constituents of sebum provide antimicrobial properties warding off bacteria and pathogens from harming internal organs and tissue. It also prevents absorption of unwanted and potentially dangerous chemicals. Sebum has nutritional value, which helps in protection of cell structure and growth.
2nd – Stratum Corneum – The second line of defense
is characterized as an intercellular cementing of fibers formed from the dead, cornified cells that acts as armor
to shield bacteria and pathogens from injuring underlying living cells. It also prohibits certain chemicals from penetration.
3rd – Hair – The key role of hair is to provide protection against heat loss. Since hair is also cuticle like the keratinized cells of the stratum corneum, it too acts as armor to diffuse penetration of irritants and pathogens. Hair supports the excretion of waste and toxins and is vehicle for transporting sebum to the surface of the skin.
4th – Immunology – The Langerhan cells play an active role in immunity through immunological surveillance. They are found in the stratum granulosum and the stratum spinosum. If pathogens make it past the first three lines of defense, the skin’s immune system kicks in by producing antibodies to diffuse bacteria.
5th – Melanin – is a stable molecule, which absorbs harmful UV-radiation and transforms the energy into harmless amounts of heat. This property enables melanin to dissipate more than 99.9 percent of the absorbed UV radiation as heat and it keeps the generation of free radicals at a minimum.
A major aspect of the innate immune defense system against invading pathogens involves melanin. Within minutes after infection, the microbe is encapsulated within melanin (melanization), and the generation of free radical byproducts during the formation of this capsule is thought to aid in their destruction.
Skin treatments have become mechanical and chemically bloated, forcing these systems of defense to shift into high
gear. People are experiencing an increase in hair growth, oiliness, flakiness, hyperpigmentation, and inflammation. These are all indications that skin perceives itself as vulnerable, exposed, and defenseless. Pollutants, not managing stress, medication, sleep deprivation, and poor diet also affect the degradation of skin’s integrity.


Individuals misusing medical procedures to rejuvenate the skin have broken skin defense. As we explore responsible measures for sun protection, considering the integrity of skin is paramount. Focusing on sun exposure should include insuring skin does not lose it’s ability to defend.

Recommended Sun Protection
Here are recommendations for a holistic approach for prevention and protection:

  • Don’t overexfoliate or peel the skin. Ensure the integrity of the stratum corneum is kept in tact. Skin between the ages of 12 to 28, should never be peeled or have microdermabration. During this age group, the majority of skin damage occurs.Exfoliation should be done two times a week. Skin between the ages of 28 and up should exfoliate two to three times a week. Skin peels are recommended twice a year and not when the sunlight is strongest. Treatments are recommended late fall and early spring, when daylight savings changes.
  • Make sure and use skin care products that inhibit collagenase. Collagenase is an enzyme that destroys collagen and disrupts receptor activity around the cell.
  • Be sure and use a lot of antioxidants, both topically and internally.
  • Never use synthetic chemical sunscreens.
  • Use sunscreens that utilize minerals like zinc for added protection.
  • Sun Diffusers are the newest entry to the market and should be investigated.
  • Mineral makeups provide added protection as the minerals reflect sunlight.
  • Limit your sun exposure to off peak times of the day – 8 a.m. to 11 p.m. and 3 p.m. to 6 p.m.
  • Have skin checked regularly for any abnormal growths.

Detection - Identifying Skin Abnormalities Major signs:

Change in size
Change in shape
Change in color

 Minor signs:

Inflammation
Crusting or bleeding
Sensory change
Diameter of seven mm or more

 

The “ABCDE” rule can help you look for signs of skin cancer. When you look at moles on your skin, look for the following:

ABCDE Rule
A for asymmetry: A mole that, when divided in half, doesn’t look the same on both sides
B for border: A mole with edges that are blurry or jagged
C for color: Changes in the color of a mole, including darkening, spread of color, loss of color, or the appearance of multiple colors such as blue, red, white, pink, purple or gray
D for diameter: A mole larger than 1/4 inch in diameter (about the size of a pencil eraser)
E for elevation: A mole that is raised above the skin and has a rough surface

You should also watch for the following skin changes:

  • mole that bleeds
  • mole that grows fast
  • scaly or crusted growth on the skin sore that won’t heal mole that itches
  • place on your skin that feels rough, like sandpaper
  • The most common site for squamous cell carcinoma of the skin is the head and neck region.
  • The most common sites for malignant melanoma include the legs in women and the upper back in both men and women.
  • Actinic keratoses, sometimes called solar keratoses, often arise on chronically sun-damaged body areas such as the face, ears, arms and hands.

When providing skin treatments, if you notice a mole that has changed, or if a new mole doesn’t look like other moles, encourage your client to visit their doctor. Skin cancer can be treated successfully if it’s treated early. Ask them if the growth is new and/or how long it has been there. Explain that you are not qualified to diagnose the growth, but would recommend that they have a doctor evaluate their skin.
There is still much to investigate regarding skin cancer and healthy choices for prevention and protection. Be sure the information you are provided is evidence-based. It is essential to keep informed on this subject as scientists from all areas are continually researching the safest way to protect our skin and stay cancer free.

(Endnotes)
1 (Maibach, H. “NDELA-Percutaneous Penetration.” FDA Contract 223-75-2340, May 19, 1978)
2 (Bronaugh, R.L., et al. “The effect of cosmetic vehicles on the penetration of N-nitrosodiethanolamine through excised human skin, J Invest Dermatol; 1981; 76(2): 94-96.)
3 (Stern, Robert S. and Laid, Nan. The carcinogenic risk of treatments for severe psoriasis. Cancer, Vol. 73, No. 11, June 1, 1994, pp. 2759-64).
4 (Garland, Cedric F., et al. could sunscreens increase melanoma risk? American Journal of Public Health, Vol. 82, No. 4, April 1992, pp. 614-15).

Anne Willis has been part of the aesthetic industry for more than 30 years. She offers premier educational programs and customized training to schools and spas and is CEO of De La Terre Skincare. Her programs are taught throughout the country delivering innovative solutions and quality support. The highest standard for education insures maximum success for your staff and the facility. 828-230-5125, info@annecwillis.com, www.anncwillis.com

 



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By | January 18, 2019

Great aromatherapy treatments

Aromatherapy is the art and science of using pure essential oils extracted from natural botanicals to relax, balance, and rejuvenate the body, mind, and spirit. The use of aromatherapy goes back to ancient China, which is believed to be the first society to have treated the body and mind with aromatic plant oils. Eventually, the practice spread to the Egyptians, Greeks, and Romans; and it regained its popularity in the late 20th century and continues to grow in approval through the 21st century.
The rejuvenated popularity that aromatherapy is experiencing can be directly linked to the actual benefits of the practice itself… the emotional and/or physical effects evoked from the aromatic essential oils. Considering that scents have the ability to alter our emotional state of mind, pure essential oils can heal our bodies through inhalation encouraging the brain to generate a reaction. The potent essences extracted from the plants have the power to treat a wide range of emotional and physical conditions. Overall, the emotional and physical effects evoked through aromatherapy include balancing, energizing, rejuvenating, cleansing, deodorizing, and purifying.
Aesthetic aromatherapy infuses essential oils into cosmetic products used for hair and skin in order to tone, cleanse, and moisturize. Customary aesthetic aromatherapy techniques include facials, body treatments, stone baths, and hydrating showers. We have included several different aromatherapy treatments from spas to assist you in building and/or strengthening your current menu; thereby providing your clients with natural, healthy resolutions to their skin care challenges and/or concerns.

Aromatherapy Facial
$85 for 60 minutes
Essential oils are selected for the treatment based on the client’s skin condition. Take into consideration the client’s reaction to the smell of the oil(s) selected, as well as any contraindications found during the client consultation. The service includes cleansing with herbal cleansers, exfoliation, extractions, facial massage and mask to suit the needs of the client’s skin.
Epiphany Day Spa NY
Hempstead, NY
516-647-0873
www.epiphanydayspany.com


Aromatherapy Massage
$115 for 50 minutes
The Aromatherapy Massage utilizes pure unadulterated essential oils from around the world. The appointed therapist should be specially trained to help select the particular blend which will be most beneficial to the client, as each essence has an affinity with certain parts of the body and emotional states of mind. The massage technique employed is one of long, smooth strokes nurturing the body as the fragrant oil permeates the skin and soul. This mind/body treatment is the perfect antidote for whatever ails the client.
New Age Health Spa
Neversink, NY
800-682-4348
www.newagehealthspa.com


Aromatherapy Oil Body Wrap
$110 for 60 minutes
Excellent for dry, dehydrated, and the most depleted skin; this classic aromatherapy wrap uses a moisturizing blend of oils with a scent - chosen by the client to nurture and hydrate the entire body. Next, oil is carefully poured on the body and lightly massaged. The client is then gently wrapped in a warm cocoon. Skin will feel quenched, satiny soft, and supple.
Eshe Day Spa and Salon
Chicago, IL
312-629-0376
www.eshedayspa.com


Aromatherapy Ultimate Facial
$130 for 80 minutes
This pampering facial begins with a muscle melting back massage customized with therapeutic aromatherapy oils to release toxins and ease stressed back and neck muscles. Then, the aromatic facial will leave the client’s skin radiant and smooth; aroma oils extracted from plants, herbs, and flowers are custom blended to feed the client’s skin’s needs. Facial includes: enzyme exfoliation, steam, custom mask, O2 vitamin blast, and a hand treatment.
Tranquility Salon and Day Spa
Mount Sinai, NY
631-642-2822
www.tranquilityny.com


Crystal Mud Lavender Manicure
$31 for 30 minutes
The healing powers of Crystal Mud trace back to ancient Chinese medicine. Lavender is well known for its sedative and antiseptic nourishment, and its ability to stimulate senses while restoring balance to the body. This manicure will harness the goodness of nature, relax the client’s mind, and allows the client to indulge in the treatment: Manicure includes European techniques with a hand massage and exfoliation, which is essential to hydrate and smooth the skin.
FAINA European Day Spa
New York City, NY
212-245-6557
www.fainaeuropeanspa.com


Herbal Body Wrap
$50 for 30 minutes, add to a massage, facial, or Endermatherapie treatment for $45
Using a special blend of exotic and medicinal herbs, the client’s body is cocoon wrapped in warm linen sheets drenched with a detoxifying herbal formula. Next, cover the client in a thermal wrap of soft, warmed blankets. In minutes, the client will feel their accumulated stress just melt away.
This treatment helps to eliminate toxins from the body and leave their skin feeling soft, smooth, and rejuvenated. During the wrap, treat the client to a soothing facial and scalp massage with special acupressure techniques and custom blended aromatherapy oils.
In Touch Massage & Day Spa
Thousand Oaks, CA
805-778-1771
www.intouchdayspa.net


Jurlique Aromatherapy Facial
$50 for 30 minutes; $80 for 60 minutes
Beauty comes from beauty. Since 1985, Jurlique has created beauty products from the handpicked flowers and plants of their biodynamic farms in South Australia. This treatment features a custom skin analysis, deep cleansing and exfoliation, hydrating steam, décolleté massage, revitalizing mask, and reconditioning. There are two packages available for this facial: the 30 minute and the 60 minute. The difference between the two packages is that the 30 minute package does not include extractions or steaming.
Natural Body Day Spa
Chattanooga, TN
423-756-2639
www.naturalbody.com


Native Blends Rejuvenating Facial
$125 for 50 minutes
Honoring ancient wisdom and healing techniques, this relaxing and purifying facial rejuvenates the skin with botanicals, minerals and the finest organic oils. The client will experience a unique cleansing ritual with herbal steam wraps, lavender and rosemary cleansers blended with plant phospholipids and deep exfoliation. A two-layer super-antioxidant mask with mushroom and pumpkin enzymes, turmeric and green tea will smooth the client’s complexion while assisting with cell regeneration. Luminous skin is an hour away.
The Crossings™
Austin, TX
512-225-1075
www.thecrossingsaustin.com


Raindrop Therapy
$80 Member; $95 Guest Package; $125 A la Carte for
60 minutes
This therapeutic technique of dropping oils directly onto the spine from a height of six inches above the body creates the sensation of warm raindrops falling onto the skin. Essential oils are then worked into the spine to stimulate impulses and disperse the oils along the nervous system and throughout the entire body. This therapy is a wonderful way to ease back pain and enhance immune function.
Westglow Resort & Spa
Blowing Rock, NC
800-562-0807
www.westglowresortandspa.com


Do you have a fruit treatment that you would like us to consider from your spa? E-mail Amy McKay at amckay@dermascope.com and let us know.


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By | January 18, 2019

Aromatherapy is the art and science of using pure essential oils extracted from natural botanicals to relax, balance, and rejuvenate the body, mind, and spirit. The use of aromatherapy goes back to ancient China, which is believed to be the first society to have treated the body and mind with aromatic plant oils. Eventually, the practice spread to the Egyptians, Greeks, and Romans; and it regained its popularity in the late 20th century and continues to grow in approval through the 21st century. The rejuvenated popularity that aromatherapy is experiencing can be directly linked to the actual benefits of the practice itself… the emotional and/or physical effects evoked from the aromatic essential oils. Considering that scents have the ability to alter our emotional state of mind, pure essential oils can heal our bodies through inhalation encouraging the brain to generate a reaction. The potent essences extracted from the plants have the power to treat a wide range of emotional and physical conditions. Overall, the emotional and physical effects evoked through aromatherapy include balancing, energizing, rejuvenating, cleansing, deodorizing, and purifying.
Aesthetic aromatherapy infuses essential oils into cosmetic products used for hair and skin in order to tone, cleanse, and moisturize. Customary aesthetic aromatherapy techniques include facials, body treatments, stone baths, and hydrating showers. We have included several different aromatherapy treatments from spas to assist you in building and/or strengthening your current menu; thereby providing your clients with natural, healthy resolutions to their skin care challenges and/or concerns.

Aromatherapy Facial
$85 for 60 minutes
Essential oils are selected for the treatment based on the client’s skin condition. Take into consideration the client’s reaction to the smell of the oil(s) selected, as well as any contraindications found during the client consultation. The service includes cleansing with herbal cleansers, exfoliation, extractions, facial massage and mask to suit the needs of the client’s skin.
Epiphany Day Spa NY
Hempstead, NY
516-647-0873
www.epiphanydayspany.com

Aromatherapy Massage
$115 for 50 minutes
The Aromatherapy Massage utilizes pure unadulterated essential oils from around the world. The appointed therapist should be specially trained to help select the particular blend which will be most beneficial to the client, as each essence has an affinity with certain parts of the body and emotional states of mind. The massage technique employed is one of long, smooth strokes nurturing the body as the fragrant oil permeates the skin and soul. This mind/body treatment is the perfect antidote for whatever ails the client.
New Age Health Spa
Neversink, NY
800-682-4348
www.newagehealthspa.com

Aromatherapy Oil Body Wrap
$110 for 60 minutes
Excellent for dry, dehydrated, and the most depleted skin; this classic aromatherapy wrap uses a moisturizing blend of oils with a scent - chosen by the client to nurture and hydrate the entire body. Next, oil is carefully poured on the body and lightly massaged. The client is then gently wrapped in a warm cocoon. Skin will feel quenched, satiny soft, and supple.
Eshe Day Spa and Salon
Chicago, IL
312-629-0376
www.eshedayspa.com

Aromatherapy Ultimate Facial
$130 for 80 minutes
This pampering facial begins with a muscle melting back massage customized with therapeutic aromatherapy oils to release toxins and ease stressed back and neck muscles. Then, the aromatic facial will leave the client’s skin radiant and smooth; aroma oils extracted from plants, herbs, and flowers are custom blended to feed the client’s skin’s needs. Facial includes: enzyme exfoliation, steam, custom mask, O2 vitamin blast, and a hand treatment.
Tranquility Salon and Day Spa
Mount Sinai, NY
631-642-2822
www.tranquilityny.com

Crystal Mud Lavender Manicure
$31 for 30 minutes
The healing powers of Crystal Mud trace back to ancient Chinese medicine. Lavender is well known for its sedative and antiseptic nourishment, and its ability to stimulate senses while restoring balance to the body. This manicure will harness the goodness of nature, relax the client’s mind, and allows the client to indulge in the treatment: Manicure includes European techniques with a hand massage and exfoliation, which is essential to hydrate and smooth the skin.
FAINA European Day Spa
New York City, NY
212-245-6557
www.fainaeuropeanspa.com

Herbal Body Wrap
$50 for 30 minutes, add to a massage, facial, or Endermatherapie treatment for $45
Using a special blend of exotic and medicinal herbs, the client’s body is cocoon wrapped in warm linen sheets drenched with a detoxifying herbal formula. Next, cover the client in a thermal wrap of soft, warmed blankets. In minutes, the client will feel their accumulated stress just melt away.
This treatment helps to eliminate toxins from the body and leave their skin feeling soft, smooth, and rejuvenated. During the wrap, treat the client to a soothing facial and scalp massage with special acupressure techniques and custom blended aromatherapy oils.
In Touch Massage & Day Spa
Thousand Oaks, CA
805-778-1771
www.intouchdayspa.net

Jurlique Aromatherapy Facial
$50 for 30 minutes; $80 for 60 minutes
Beauty comes from beauty. Since 1985, Jurlique has created beauty products from the handpicked flowers and plants of their biodynamic farms in South Australia. This treatment features a custom skin analysis, deep cleansing and exfoliation, hydrating steam, décolleté massage, revitalizing mask, and reconditioning. There are two packages available for this facial: the 30 minute and the 60 minute. The difference between the two packages is that the 30 minute package does not include extractions or steaming.
Natural Body Day Spa
Chattanooga, TN
423-756-2639
www.naturalbody.com

Native Blends Rejuvenating Facial
$125 for 50 minutes
Honoring ancient wisdom and healing techniques, this relaxing and purifying facial rejuvenates the skin with botanicals, minerals and the finest organic oils. The client will experience a unique cleansing ritual with herbal steam wraps, lavender and rosemary cleansers blended with plant phospholipids and deep exfoliation. A two-layer super-antioxidant mask with mushroom and pumpkin enzymes, turmeric and green tea will smooth the client’s complexion while assisting with cell regeneration. Luminous skin is an hour away.
The Crossings™
Austin, TX
512-225-1075
www.thecrossingsaustin.com

Raindrop Therapy
$80 Member; $95 Guest Package; $125 A la Carte for
60 minutes
This therapeutic technique of dropping oils directly onto the spine from a height of six inches above the body creates the sensation of warm raindrops falling onto the skin. Essential oils are then worked into the spine to stimulate impulses and disperse the oils along the nervous system and throughout the entire body. This therapy is a wonderful way to ease back pain and enhance immune function.
Westglow Resort & Spa
Blowing Rock, NC
800-562-0807
www.westglowresortandspa.com



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By | January 18, 2019

by Michelle D'Allaird

The concept of exfoliation is nothing new, and this most certainly is not the first article you have ever read on the topic. There are ever changing products and equipment for exfoliation. However, the one thing that doesn’t change is the physiological way your skin functions. With that in mind, let’s talk about what it is, why we need it, and how to determine when enough is enough!
The concept of exfoliation has been around longer than we can even imagine. The first practice of exfoliation is given to the ancient Egyptians, if you will recall, Cleopatra used to bathe in milk, a.k.a. lactic acid! In the Middle Ages, wine was used as a chemical exfoliant, with tartaric acid as the active agent. In Asia, the practice of exfoliation started hundreds of years ago. Uses of exfoliation were not simply to beautify the skin, but also noted for ridding the body of illness, rites of passage, detoxification, and removing evil spirits! For purposes of the 21st century, let’s stick to beautifying and improving the health of the skin.

A Little Skin Physiology
We all understand the concept of cell renewal. New skin cells are created in the basal layer of the skin, via a process called mitosis. Over time, cells migrate to the surface of the skin, undergoing a process known as keratinization, becoming more acidic and resulting in hard, flattened keratinized skin cells, called corneocytes. Keratin, the protein substance that makes up our hair, nails, and skin, plays a crucial role in protecting the skin from outside elements. In young, healthy skin, the approximate time it takes for a cell to travel from the basal layer to the stratum corneum to be sloughed from the surface is about 28 days.

The Reality of it All…
The skin is a truly amazing organ. Without it, no other organ would survive; it has the ability to control body temperature, waste removal, detoxification, provide structure and protection, as well as to make us look good. It also has the unique ability to completely replace itself, all on its own. The reality is that it is designed to do it by itself! Until of course, you throw in… the “human factor.”
Now, we won’t take all of the blame, but let’s look at factors that influence the rate of cell turnover. As we age, especially following menopause for women, the natural process of skin erosion becomes uneven, which results in a loss of retained water, a dry, rough, and uneven texture. Obviously, we can’t stop the natural aging process, but we can do something about factors that contribute to the “unnatural,” or pre-mature aging process. External factors such as pollution, UV exposure, smoking, poor diet, stress, medications, illness, improper product use, and excess exfoliation all contribute to early aging of the skin, and an inhibited rate of cell turnover. Now I don’t know about you, but I can’t even come up with a dozen people that I know that have not fallen to one of the factors on
that list!


Subscribe to DERMASCOPE to read the full article.


Michelle D’Allaird is a New York State licensed aesthetician and International CIDESCO Diplomat. She is the owner of the Aesthetic Science Institute aesthetic schools in Syracuse and Latham, N.Y. She is a consultant and educator for international cosmetic companies around the world. D’Allaird is a contributing author to major industry trade magazines, as well as a host and speaker for International Congress of Esthetics & Spa conferences in Miami, Philadelphia, Dallas, and Long Beach. She is also a co-author of Salon Fundamentals aesthetic textbook. Her expertise lies in education and curriculum development for aesthetic, medical, and laser courses.



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By | January 18, 2019

A LITTLE HISTORY
Laser hair removal procedures in 2010 totaled to 936, 121, which reflected a -26.9% decrease from 2009 – most likely as a result of a flexing economy.1 It is a procedure, however, that continues to be popular.
Lasers (including the CO2 laser) were introduced in dermatology and surgery as early as the 1960s.2 The CO2 laser became more popular during the 1990s for skin resurfacing to improve wrinkles, dischromias, scars, atrophic scars, pitted acne scars and others.3 These pioneering procedures also meant longer recovery periods.
Newer generations of thermal lasers, including fractional lasers and controlled non-ablative pulsed lasers helped influence a new field of aesthetic medicine during the past 15 years. Many laser services are now considered lunchtime procedures unlike the earlier CO2 skin resurfacing procedure that required several days to weeks for recovery. Modern services include hair reduction, skin rejuvenation, pigmentation, vascular lesions (port wine stains, telangiectasia, superficial veins) and tattoo removal. Manufacturers for contemporary thermal devices for cosmetic treatments (laser, intense pulse light (IPL), and radio frequency) have perfected their machines through incorporating more contemporary smart features that support ease of calibration and use, safety and more controlled outcome of a procedure. Moreover, the passing of time during the past 20 years has allowed for additional research including a greater understanding of thermal effects on tissue, refinement of techniques, writing of peer-reviewed studies, and witnessing the transition into a medical spa environment.

EDUCATIONAL REQUIREMENTS
A growing concern involves the inconsistency of statewide variants as to who is allowed to operate a non-ablative laser, i.e., hair removal lasers in particular. Additionally, one must be mindful that lasers/IPL devices can be dangerous in the hands of an unskilled operator.
Reviewing the evolution of laser technology (including radio frequency and any device that perpetrates a thermal response in tissue) and its place in aesthetic medicine brings with it many challenges when it comes to consistent and adequate education in the use of non-ablative technology. Both medical and aesthetic personnel, each of whom will vary in education level, should be trained and certified in safe operation of these machines. Additionally, they must also work within the scope of their licensing. A few hours of manufacturer training in an office is not always adequate. Furthermore, learning laser theory without sufficient hours of hands-on practicum under the guidance of an experienced tutor again is not recommended. It takes practice to perfect the understanding of laser operation, tissue response and how to remedy any unexpected result. Moreover, this knowledge and precaution should not be limited to procedures that solely create heat shock to the skin (laser/IPL/radio frequency). Rather it should pertain to all other treatment procedures (chemical peels, microdermabrasion, ultrasound, dermal needling) that may pose a risk for tissue injury (controlled or unexpected) including interference with the normal biological functioning of the skin – acid mantle, immune cells, keratinocytes, melanocytes, nerve cells, fibroblasts, Natural Moisturizing Factors (NMF), enzyme processes and more.
An in-depth understanding in the dermal sciences should be mandated for all aesthetic professionals. Study should include skin histology, cells and systems, skin disorders and diseases, melanogenesis (pigment), angiogenesis (vascular and circulatory system), the immune response during a procedure, successful wound healing during the use of a device that creates a thermal response in the skin, or even a chemical or mechanical wound. Included in this list is the importance of understanding the procedural effects of thermal technology on all skin colors and cultural variation. Most important is to develop one’s ability to fully grasp the degree of possible risks for global skin types that are becoming more prevalent within our North American society. Cultural (race) diversity includes Caucasian, non-Caucasian and mixed population groups found in many parts of the world and here. The outcome and rate of healing may vary within each category. Furthermore, product choices should be carefully studied so that we apply ingredients that are non-toxic and bio-identical to skin components.

SKIN ANALYSIS
Prior to performing any procedure, a detailed systematic pathway of skin analysis is required that encompasses the client’s health history, life style profile, visual and verbal interview, and client expectations. The accuracy of this assessment is also dependent upon the education level of the practitioner who should be savvy enough to recognize indicators for potential tissue reaction and risk, healing potential and final outcome and success of a procedure. Without mastery of these underlying concepts, mistakes can be made with potential irreversible consequences.
The next section of this article will discuss an important aspect of skin histology beginning with a review of human origins and the melanogenesis story. We will travel back in time because it reveals valuable insight in supporting our decisions when performing laser/IPL treatments. Moreover, this information is relevant for ALL aesthetic services including chemical peels, enzymes, microdermabrasion and other skin-rejuvenating services.

HUMAN ORIGINS
When we first meet another person, we immediately notice the color of their skin, their hair, and other anatomical features that subtly provides indicators to their racial and geographical origin. Physical appearance (anatomical features) also influences the propensity for sexual attraction resulting in proliferation of a species. What differentiates the gradation or degree of color in human beings is based on several observations. Regardless of skin color, the purpose, function and biological requirements of cells remain consistent in all individuals no matter what their geographical location.4 What encourages body health and human survival are balanced nutrients, light and darkness, optimum immune response, healthy cell membranes and skin barrier, the ability to adapt into an environment, and healthy social structures. Cells have receptors and sensors that are responsive to external and internal stimuli that collectively become part of a greater communication network within the body. Synchronicity of ALL systems is based on genetic adaptation that leads to optimum human health and survival.5 There may be, however, some differences between race groups based on origins and genetic adaptive characteristics. This is a key observation.
The closer one originates from locations in proximity to the equator, the darker the skin with the biochemistry, including skin color, adapting accordingly. Populations originating in colder latitudes north and south of the equator are lighter in skin color.5 Anthropology studies substantiate that through a process called Natural Selection and Biodiversity, humans have a remarkable innate ability to adapt to their natural surroundings. This may be at sea level, to mountain regions, rain forest and hot desert. Body structures, height, and the amount of body fat are all adaptive mechanisms that reveal clues as to one’s origin. For example, long, linear bodies tend to be correlated with hot, dry climates. Short, stocky body builds with shorter fingers and toes are found in colder, wet climates.6,7 What about individuals who tend to have larger lungs and chest cavities and whose ancestors originated at higher elevations with lower oxygen supply? At first you may ask why these differences exist. My answer to you is to explore the biological requirements of the cells and systems that promote healthy body functioning based on climatic and environmental adaptivity.
Here is another observation: It took thousands of years for humans to evolve and create features and biological responses that safeguarded survival in their native location. Genetic adaptations occur due to phenomena called environmental stresses (or evolutionary pressure) that include temperature, humidity, various altitudes, bacterial and viral infection, air quality, and dietary imbalance.7 When these conditions become persistent over several generations, survival requires a biological evolution for genetic adaptation.7 A good example is when populations lived during times of disease. They began to acquire genetic traits that helped them build immunity to those microorganisms. Genetic traits, as a result, are passed to subsequent generations. It also provides clues as to why individuals may experience health challenges including various skin conditions. For the price of a plane ticket, modern humans can relocate in a day to another part of the world. It certainly could promote a bit of biological and psychological havoc!
Considering that it took humans 25,000 to 50,000 years of adaptation, what biological and anatomical changes occurred when humans relocated from the core of Africa into northern or southern latitudes? Movement into these colder regions eventually caused darker skin to lighten proportionally to the distance to which they migrated. This resulted in a gradation (or range) of skin colors.9 What is the underlying reason for color adaptation in humans? We will move on to discuss melanin and body health.

MELANOCYTES – A Dendritic UV Filter System
There is a strong correlation between UV radiation and the biological requirements for health, specifically for vitamin D synthesis. Melanocyte function is primarily under genetic and hormonal controls that continuously strive to keep our natural level of skin color in check in order to regulate UV absorption. Both light and dark skin have variable sized melanin particles. The density and size of pigment particles become greater in darker skin types. An exception is with red heads that possess what is known as red gene MC1R factor resulting in fair skin, freckles, and red hair. Unlike their neighbors, the keratinocytes, melanocytes are slow cycling and long lived. After the age of 16 the regeneration cycle of melanocytes become limited. Beginning in our 30s and 40s the density of active melanocytes is reduced by 10 to 20 percent every ten years.10, 11
One in 10 cells in the basal area are melanocytes and serve to protect germinating nuclei of epidermal cells. They manufacture and package pigment granules (melanosomes) that are injected via dendrites into the keratinocytes. They are considered a photoprotective filter that becomes part of the natural skin barrier. These pigment cells reduce and control the penetration of all wavelengths of light to dermal tissues.10 This is a key function of the melanocyte and should not be overlooked. Melanin function includes not only UV filtering but also acts as a free radical scavenger due to its bipolymer complex structures as well as being a cation trap for toxic metals.8 We also have melanin receptors in the cones of our eyes; however, we will focus on the skin in this article.
It is well understood that over-absorption of UV radiation can result in cell destruction and suppression of thermoregulation and other biological processes. 9 A controlled amount of UVB must, however, enter the skin cell receptors in order for the body to catalyze vitamin D, a group of fat-soluble secosteroids. Approximately 90 percent is this vitamin is normally synthesized in the basal and spinosum layers of the skin. The other 10 percent can come from our nutrition (fatty fish, egg yolks).

  • Vitamin D3 (cholecalciferol) is required for the intestines to absorb calcium and phosphorus from food for bone growth and repair as well as regulate heart rhythm. Rickets is a prime example due to calcium deficiency.
  • Vitamin D is required for our immune system as well as helps control inflammation and influences gene regulation, differentiation, and apoptosis of cells. 8
  • Vitamin D deficiencies during pregnancy can result in pelvic deformities in women preventing normal delivery of babies.11
  • The activity of melanocytes in controlling and filtering is important to protecting UV photolysis (light-stimulated chemical decomposition) of folic acid (foliate, a B vitamin). Deficiencies in this nutrient can lead to anemia and creates risk for poor fetal development, resulting in miscarriage and poor reproductive success. 8

The control and rate of melanin production is essential for Vitamin D synthesis. The duration of UVB exposure must be sufficient to catalyze provitamin D3.What is important, however, that this regulation is genetically controlled through the adaptive traits inherited from our ancestors and region of origin. There are reasons for gradation of color based on these genetic traits. An increase of melanin in the skin increases the length of exposure to UV that is required for synthesis of the provitamin D3. For example, the formation of provitamin D3 takes more than five times as long in a very dark skin (Type VI) versus a light skin (Type III).8 Lighter skin types who originate further away from the equator require variable exposure times depending upon their location.

WHEN THINGS GO WRONG
The correct choice of wavelength, correct treatment settings, and technique in hair reduction or another aesthetic laser treatment are indeed important considerations. Whether in laser hair reduction or reducing the appearance of pigment on the skin, and skin rejuvenation, the propensity for adverse reactions increases with darker skin types. Moreover, when there is racial blending, this becomes a red flag for hidden potential risks. Do not be fooled by visual observation. A skin may appear dark but possess an ability to burn (and/or react) due to mixed ancestor traits including undisclosed health issues. Lighter skin types also become susceptible to cellular oxidation and damage when they are living in an area not native to their origins that also increases their risk for cancer. A key is to assess whether a condition is actually treatable. Is the client a good candidate for the service?
And finally, when considering treatment for correcting melasma and other pigmentation disorders one must determine the significance of the initial underlying causes. Do you understand the concepts of the melanogenesis story and the biological implications when melanocytes are damaged, including the mitochondria and possible shortening of the dendrites from oxidative stress, damage, and aging? Is there damage to the keratinocytes? Moreover, considering that pigment is deposited into the cells at the spinosum layer in the newly formed keratinocytes, what if there is a weak spinosum layer or the presence of an imbalanced enzyme or lack of a key chemical substance during this transitional process? Moving further into the dermis structures, the degradation of collagen and elastin, and ground substance (caused from numerous factors including aging and oxidative stress) poses another clue into a larger picture.

FAST FORWARD – 21st Century
How is all of this information relevant to our skin care practice or laser center? It is not enough to look at someone and visually determine their Fitzpatrick type or treatment outcome. Rather there is a subtler underlying story when it comes to successful result of any treatment.

Sources:
1 Cosmetic Surgery National Data Bank Statistics, 2010 Report. Retrieved from http://www.surgery.org/sites/default/files/Stats2010_1.pdf
2 Laser hair removal history and current issues. Retrieved from http://www.hairfacts.com/methods/laser/laser-hair-removal-history-and-current-issues/
3 Sandhu, N., Elston, D. (2010) Cutaneous Laser Resurfacing, Carbon Dioxide. Medscape Reference. Retrieved from http://emedicine.medscape.com/article/1120283-overview#aw2aab6b4
4 Rawlings, A.V. (2005) Ethnic Skin Types: Are there Differences in Skin Structure and Function? Presented as a keynote lecture at the IFSCC International Conference, Florence, Italy. Retrieved from http://wwww.pharmaclinix.com/ifscc_extract.pdf
5 Jablonski, N. (2006) Skin: A Natural History. University of California Press. Berkley, California
6 Black History: Modern scientific explanation of human biological variation – Race. Retrieved from http://www.britannica.com/blackhistory/article-234690
7 O’Neil, D. (2011) Human Biological Adaptability. An introduction to Human Responses to Common Environmental Stresses. Behavioral Sciences Dept. Palomar College, San Marcos, California. Retrieved from http://anthro.paomar.educ/adap/adapt_4htm
8 Jablonski, N., Chaplin, G. (2000) The evolution of human skin coloration. Journal of Human Evolution; 39, 57-106. Retrieved from http://www.bgsu.edu/departments/chem/faculty/leontis/chem447/PDF_files/Jablonski_skin_color_2000.pdf
9 Barrett-Hill, F. (2005) Advanced Skin Analysis. Virtual Beauty, New Zealand.
10 Alam, M. Ashish, B. et al (2004) Cosmetic Dermatology for Skin of Color. McGraw-Hill Medical, NY. P1-8
11 Holick, M.F. (1995). Environmental factors that influence the cutaneous production of vitamin D 1-3. Am J ClinNutr 1995:61 (supple): 638S



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By | January 18, 2019

 

by Maurice Stein

 

The first preparation before a foundation is placed on the skin is to properly clean the skin. I always recommend using a cleanser that has non-drying additives and can reach deep beneath the skin's outer layer to bring out environmental dirt and residue from cosmetic applications. My rule of thumb, "The cleaner the skin, the more the foundation will lock onto the skin to promote a fresh and longer lasting look."

Most people need, and should use, a moisturizer after cleaning their skin. Because of the sun and environmental elements the skin is exposed to, I also encourage the use of a sunscreen before the foundation is applied. Apply the moisturizer and wait 60 to 90 seconds before adding the sunscreen. If you apply both products too quickly before they have a chance to penetrate into the skin, you're basically mixing the two products together, subsequently reducing the effects. The same can happen when using a moisturizer that has a built-in sun block. I discourage use of products that combine these two elements, as the best results are when they're applied separately from each other. If you want to nourish the skin, apply an evening moisturizer before going to bed. This will penetrate deep into the skin while you're sleeping, and allow the product eight or more hours to absorb into the skin. Follow through with a lighter daytime moisturizer before applying the sunscreen and make-up. This will insure that your skin is getting that extra added protection throughout the day.

As a film and television make-up artist, I've had the opportunity of seeing what works and what doesn't. With new formulations today, I urge using a silicone-based primer. This can be applied after using your moisturizer and sunscreen, locking them in, and will further protect your skin from sun, wind, and other environmental pollutants that are in the air. This will also aid in slowing down weathering and aging of your skin, and really does help fill in fine lines and crevices.

When it comes time to apply your foundation, you'll find that you do not need to apply as much, as the silicone-based primer has created a smoother texture to the skin. When I was working on location in films, we were often in remote areas where the sun and wind were our greatest challenges in keeping the actors skin looking fresh and natural. As make-up artists, we had to become master magicians. We retrieved age-old "secrets" of make-up artistry, added our own formulation, and brought these "secrets" into the 21st century. In doing our homework and research, one of the areas we realized would help maintain a protective barrier for the skin and still allow a natural, smooth texture was with a silicone-based primer.

Remember that the foundation is the skin's "overcoat." Most people make the mistake of over applying a foundation. This can easily create a "manufactured" look, with the color tone becoming more dramatic and uneven with each application. The foundation should always be applied with a professional non-latex foam sponge.

With the foundation in place, follow through by using a light, non-color, translucent powder to set. Again, for best professional results, use a professional powder puff, not a powder brush, and with a patting motion, gently pat the face. This will set the foundation. You're now ready to apply your blush, eyebrows, eyeshadow, and lip color.

The skin is only as healthy as the time and preparation that goes into keeping it nourished. If you follow these simple steps (moisturizer, sunscreen, and silicone based primer), your skin will maintain a healthier glow, smoother texture, and your make-up have longer longevity on the skin throughout the day.

Maurice Stein is founder, owner, and operator of CINEMA SECRETS in Burbank, Calif., and recognized as one of Hollywood's elite make-up artists, educators and entrepreneurs. Stein designed and developed the Ultimate Cinema Secrets product line for the general public, film/TV industry, and for the medical community. For more information, or to purchase product, please visit www.cinemasecrets.com. If you would like to direct questions to Maurice Stein, or to inquire on his lecture and seminar availability, please email him at maurice@cinemasecrets.com, or call 818-846-0579.



Read More
By | January 18, 2019

The first preparation before a foundation is placed on the skin is to properly clean the skin. I always recommend using a cleanser that has non-drying additives and can reach deep beneath the skin's outer layer to bring out environmental dirt and residue from cosmetic applications. My rule of thumb, "The cleaner the skin, the more the foundation will lock onto the skin to promote a fresh and longer lasting look."
Most people need, and should use, a moisturizer after cleaning their skin. Because of the sun and environmental elements the skin is exposed to, I also encourage the use of a sunscreen before the foundation is applied.

Apply the moisturizer and wait 60 to 90 seconds before adding the sunscreen. If you apply both products too quickly before they have a chance to penetrate into the skin, you're basically mixing the two products together, subsequently reducing the effects. The same can happen when using a moisturizer that has a built-in sun block. I discourage use of products that combine these two elements, as the best results are when they're applied separately from each other. If you want to nourish the skin, apply an evening moisturizer before going to bed. This will penetrate deep into the skin while you're sleeping, and allow the product eight or more hours to absorb into the skin. Follow through with a lighter daytime moisturizer before applying the sunscreen and make-up. This will insure that your skin is getting that extra added protection throughout the day.
As a film and television make-up artist, I've had the opportunity of seeing what works and what doesn't. With new formulations today, I urge using a silicone-based primer. This can be applied after using your moisturizer and sunscreen, locking them in, and will further protect your skin from sun, wind, and other environmental pollutants that are in the air. This will also aid in slowing down weathering and aging of your skin, and really does help fill in fine lines and crevices.
When it comes time to apply your foundation, you'll find that you do not need to apply as much, as the silicone-based primer has created a smoother texture to the skin. When I was working on location in films, we were often in remote areas where the sun and wind were our greatest challenges in keeping the actors skin looking fresh and natural. As make-up artists, we had to become master magicians. We retrieved age-old "secrets" of make-up artistry, added our own formulation, and brought these "secrets" into the 21st century. In doing our homework and research, one of the areas we realized would help maintain a protective barrier for the skin and still allow a natural, smooth texture was with a silicone-based primer.
Remember that the foundation is the skin's "overcoat." Most people make the mistake of over applying a foundation. This can easily create a "manufactured" look, with the color tone becoming more dramatic and uneven with each application. The foundation should always be applied with a professional non-latex foam sponge.
With the foundation in place, follow through by using a light, non-color, translucent powder to set. Again, for best professional results, use a professional powder puff, not a powder brush, and with a patting motion, gently pat the face. This will set the foundation. You're now ready to apply your blush, eyebrows, eyeshadow, and lip color.
The skin is only as healthy as the time and preparation that goes into keeping it nourished. If you follow these simple steps (moisturizer, sunscreen, and silicone based primer), your skin will maintain a healthier glow, smoother texture, and your make-up have longer longevity on the skin throughout the day.

Maurice Stein is founder, owner, and operator of CINEMA SECRETS in Burbank, Calif., and recognized as one of Hollywood's elite make-up artists, educators and entrepreneurs. Stein designed and developed the Ultimate Cinema Secrets product line for the general public, film/TV industry, and for the medical community. For more information, or to purchase product, please visit www.cinemasecrets.com. If you would like to direct questions to Maurice Stein, or to inquire on his lecture and seminar availability, please email him at maurice@cinemasecrets.com, or call 818-846-0579.



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