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By Jeremy Lawrence | January 16, 2019

As Americans of the 21st century, we sometimes beat ourselves up for our youth-obsession. More traditional cultures, we remind ourselves, honor elders. We berate ourselves for being shallow and vain as we fret over the evidence of the passing years.
But, really… even the Confucian sages of ancient China were full of praise for the “Yin” of very young women, commenting that this essential quality dissipated quickly as the woman moved out of her teens; and so on. The fact is, the only people who ever want to look older are tweens and teens, who just want to hang out in cool nightclubs and other places grown-ups go.

Young skin is defined by its health. While it is possible for young skin to be affected by disorders such as acne, eczema and rosacea, clients generally characterize young skin as healthy skin, when cell turnover is at its peak, and the skin’s naturally taut surface snaps back into place like a new pair of Spanx, thanks to robust, intact collagen and elastin.
The fact is that all of this begins to change early in life. When the results become immediately visible it varies from individual to individual. Age-related skin changes are the result of two things: Our genetic blueprint encoded in our DNA (intrinsic factors) as well as environmental wear-and-tear (extrinsic factors).
How much of it is heredity, and how much is lifestyle? Both aspects must factor into the creation of a proactive, preventive skin health program. One immediate difference is that, unless the client undergoes exhaustive DNA testing, it is impossible to know very much about the body’s intrinsic programming. Typically, we only have direct experience with one or two prior generations (mother, grandmother), but the genetic material of which we are composed dates from centuries earlier. So, our full genetic “recipe” and its inherited predispositions remain a mystery.
By contrast, we can address the here and now, specifically how we treat our skin and our bodies. We can also examine and assess our environment in order to evaluate how the external world will impact us.
Experts concur that at least 90 percent of what we interpret as visible skin aging, such as fine lines, loss of contour and hyperpigmentation, is extrinsic, specifically linked to free radical damage, with UV or photoaging heading the list. Our innate genetic material dictates how well we handle the assault of sun-damage, as well as other damage inflicted by cigarette smoke and other external stressors. For instance, a major player in the condition of every woman’s skin is estrogen. The approach of menopause, as well as other hormonal shifts, may produce visible effects in the skin, regardless of sun-exposure or other external factors.
This duality confuses many clients, especially when it comes to lifestyle choices. For this reason, early education about skin health is a key part of every skin therapist’s mission. Engaging the client in a partnership to keep skin at its healthiest by definition also will help to delay “pulling the trigger” on the cascade of processes which lead to skin aging.

The New Enemy: Sugar
This time, it is not about brownies, cupcakes or an uncontrollable sweet-tooth. One of the major recent research breakthroughs regarding skin aging has to do with sugar or glycation. We now know that collagen and elastin proteins are highly susceptible to an internal chemical reaction within the body. The same glucose that provides energy for our cells can react with proteins, such as collagen, resulting in the formation of Advanced Glycation End-products (AGEs) and free radicals (ROS). This contributes to cross-linking of protein fibers, the loss of elasticity and changes in the dermis. When AGEs form in the skin, they activate a receptor site on cells and form a complex known as Receptor Advanced Glycation End-products (RAGE) that signals cellular processes related to inflammation and subsequent disease. Coupled with this are two additional biochemical reactions in the skin:sugar

  • The formation of Reactive Oxygen Species (ROS)
  • The activation of Matrix Metalloproteinase enzymes (MMPs)

ROS include oxygen ions, free radicals and peroxides. They are generally very small molecules and are highly reactive due to the presence of unpaired electrons. ROS form as a natural byproduct of the normal metabolism of oxygen. During times of environmental stress, ROS levels can increase dramatically, causing significant damage to cell structures. This is known as oxidative stress, which is the major cause of degenerative disorders including aging and disease.
Matrix degrading MMPs are enzymes that when activated, control matrix degradation in the dermis. Each MMP is specific for particular collagens or other proteins in the extracellular matrix of the dermis. Within hours of UV exposure the MMP genes are activated resulting in biosynthesis of collagenase and other MMPs. Because collagenase degrades collagen (and inhibits formation of new collagen), long term elevation results in disorganized and clumped collagen which is characteristic of photoaged skin. All of these biochemical reactions contribute to the cross-linking of protein fibers in the skin, which translates as skin degradation and loss of structural integrity. The visible result of this cross-linking is the clumping, thickened, “ropy” effect we often observe in aged skin, especially skin which has been subjected to sun, cigarette-smoke and other forms of oxidative stress.
These reactions, formations and visible results are linked with inflammation, which now is recognized as the enemy of overall health in virtually every physiological system. Again, simply put, inflammation is the catalyst behind what we know as the aging process, in the skin and throughout the body. The key to healthier skin which retains the resiliency of youth is to “trap” or arrest these biochemicals and quench them before they damage collagen and other tissues.

Managing These Biochemical Reactions
Our bodies are designed to fight free radical damage intrinsically. However, the fact is that modern industrial life places our defense systems on “overload.” Also, we are living longer than past generations, so our natural defensive reserves may be depleted well before our lives end. These facts require support and supplementation, including topically applied products.exfoliation

Ingredients Demonstrated to fight MMPs, AGEs and ROS:

  • Dipotassium glycyrrhizate (licorice)
  • Genestein
  • Glucosamine
  • Argine/Lysine polypeptide
  • Palmitoyl tripeptide-5
  • Retinol, retinyl palmitate (vitamin A)
  • Ascorbic acid, magnesium ascorbyl phosphate (vitamin C)
  • Tocopheryl acetate (vitamin E)
  • Linoleic acid (vitamin F)
  • Bioflavinoids:
  • Proanthocyanidins from grape seed extract
  • Polyphenols from green and white tea
  • Soy phytoestrogens
  • Beta-Glucan

soft-skinSearch out these types of ingredients when considering age-fighting skin products for your business. Visible results that address the signs of aging are what your client seeks and you need to be fully confident in what formulas can get those results, both at home and in the treatment room.

Putting Oxidation, Inflammation and Aging Under “House Arrest”
The treatment room can be the true tipping-point for an informed, effective skin care program which arrests the oxidation and inflammation of aging. While statistics do indicate that fewer than 7 percent of Americans have regular skin care treatments, work with your team members to create a strategy which raises this number.
Begin by offering short, intensive treatments which focus upon one aspect of reducing visible aging, such as flash exfoliation. A 20-minute resurfacing and brightening treatment, utilizing hydroxy acids to remove dulling surface debris which accumulate more densely as we age as the result of slower cell-turnover, will open clients’ eyes to the power of topical skin therapy.
Create a no-pressure sampling area or skin bar where clients can gain tips on how to use skin products while trying them on their own skin through a guided skin lesson; and send them home with trial sizes to experience results and pique their interest.
Exfoliation which can be customized and calibrated in strength to the client’s skin needs is key. The latest formulas combine a cocktail of multi-action exfoliation components like retinol, hydroxy acids, peptides, mineral powders and protease enzymes in soothing olive and chamomile bases. These deliver desired results while averting unnecessary skin irritation.
Various technologies will help deliver the benefits of the “A list” ingredients more rapidly and more effectively into the skin to expedite results. Electrical modalities like ultrasonic, iontophoresis, microcurrent and indirect high frequency may prove indispensable in delivering the degree of visible improvement needed to encourage your clients to book and rebook.
When discussing the use of ultrasonic in skin care, we are of course referring to therapeutic ultrasound as opposed to diagnostic. In addition to ultrasonic (especially blades) being a deep cleansing treatment and allowing for the release of dead surface skin cells and loosening of comedones, sonophoresis or phonophoresis uses ultrasound energy in order to enhance the skin penetration of active substances through a process that creates gaps in the lipid component of the skin. Use during your treatment protocol with cleansers, serums, complexes and gel masks.
Galvanic iontophoresis or ionization is a process where galvanic current is used on the positive polarity to pass active substances through the intact skin where, once penetrated, they remain working. Use with serums, complexes, gel and water based masks and moisturizers.
Indirect high frequency is the use of the high frequency current to aid in product penetration and skin stimulation. It is ideal for a skin that needs stimulation, such as a dry or lackluster skin, but that may be contraindicated to a European style massage. Use with oil-based massage creams.
Microcurrent machines have dual usage in a professional treatment as a tool for muscle re-education to firm the skin and to increase cell energy levels and for specific iontophoresis, that allows for the penetration of active ingredients to the deeper layers of the epidermis.  Use with toners, serums, complexes, gel and water-based masks and moisturizers.
Professional treatments and preventive home care are just part of the overall picture. As mentioned earlier, inflammation now is identified as the root-cause of many conditions and syndromes associated with aging, including Alzheimer’s. Preventing and reversing inflammation goes more than skin-deep; it is an overall lifestyle approach.
Massage, stress-reduction, diet, nutrition (including supplements), activity, exercise and perhaps most importantly a feeling of engagement and community matter in every phase of life. But the choices in these areas become more critical as we age, since the metabolism has naturally begun to slow, and we cannot recover from blows as easily as we once did. Certainly there is more to the equation than drinking enough water and shielding our skin from those killer rays.
When developing a regimen for skin, which stays in prime shape regardless of how many candles blaze on the birthday cake, begin with those factors over which we have some control. Explore the intrinsic factors, through a comprehensive examination and analysis. Then build a program based upon this knowledge and the evidence collected through the extrinsic record, which is the skin itself.
Most importantly, check the time. The needs of the skin are always changing, and we owe it to our clients to move with them through the seasons, cycles and their new array of demands and opportunities. In this way, advanced skin care challenges past perceptions of age, making healthy skin a timeless objective.

annet king-hsA unique understanding of the global skin care market combined with dynamic leadership skills make Annet King an invaluable asset to The International Dermal Institute. King develops, writes, presents, and monitors the success of all classes which comprise the IDI curriculum. King is both CIDESCO, ITEC, and CIBTAC-certified, placing her in the uppermost echelon of world-class skin care professionals. She is regularly sought as a source by journalists to comment on skin care issues, and is a frequent contributor to magazines, websites, and blogs on the subject of creating and operating a successful skin care business, as well as the specific science and art of skin and body care. King currently resides in Los Angeles and works at the IDI headquarters located in Carson, Calif.



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21st Century Labs
January 16, 2019

salon-spa21st Century Laboratory produces cutting edge hair care, skin care, spa, cosmetic, and cosmeceutical formulations with natural ingredients and organically grown botanicals, including sulfate free formulations.Our combination of highly specialized equipment and extensive background in the cosmetics industry allows us to innovate or optimize top-notch cosmeceuticals for private labeling. Our methodology at 21st Century Laboratory requires the strictest quality control standards.



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By | January 16, 2019

21st Century Television is pleased to announce that Naturel Collagen has won the prestigious “Telly Award” for excellence in programming. Naturel Collagen offers anti-aging products that use fish-based collagen, which interacts perfectly with the human body. Naturel Collagen’s products possess epidermal repair properties never before seen in synthetic and bovine-based collagen products.



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By Jeremy Lawrence | January 16, 2019

Great customer service is the cornerstone of any business – keeping clients happy with their services and overall brand will keep them coming back.

Customer service now goes well beyond talking to the front desk staff, calling the customer care line, or even sending an e-mail. Customer service lives on social media, which makes it a very visible part of the business' brand.

This news is great for businesses because social media offers an opportunity to immediately connect with customers, solve any issues, and keep the business at the top of the customer's mind.

pic-1BENEFITS OF CUSTOMER CARE ON SOCIAL MEDIA
Increases Accessibility
Regardless of the industry of a business, that business' customers are on social media: They are engaging with friends and colleagues and while they are at it, they may just engage with a business. Clients take to social media to share their experiences with businesses – good or bad – ask questions, and look for solutions to problems. Sending a tweet, posting to a brand's Facebook wall, or commenting on an Instagram picture can be easier than making a phone call or writing an e-mail because that customer is already actively on the business' social platform. As a business, this access provides an opportunity to answer clients' questions in whichever way is easiest and most accessible.

Engagement Begets Engagement (and Trust)
The more skin care professionals engage with clients online, the more others will begin to engage with the professional. If a client sees the professional answer another client's question or resolve a complaint on social media, that client will be more likely to reach out to the professional on social media. Responding directly to the client on the platform in which they asked the question also allows current and potential clients to see the great customer service the professional offers. This engagement not only encourages professionals to be more active with their online presence, but also builds trust with their clients. Furthermore, the more people the professional engages with on these platforms, the more searchable and discoverable their profile becomes, making it easier for new clients to find them.

Expanding the Relationship Beyond the Treatment Room
Building a social media presence for the spa and engaging with clients online allows the professional to foster and grow connections with clients even when they are not receiving a service. Extending good customer service to any feedback the professional receives on social media, positive or negative, reinforces the positive experiences the client has had within the treatment room and the spa. This response furthers the connection the client feels to the business and the brand.

Third Party Recommendations
Recommendations from friends and family can make a huge difference when potential clients are deciding where or from whom to receive a service. The same can be said for online reviews and conversations. The internet has opened up a world of research that allows people to explore others' experiences with something they may want to try and many people turn to social media for such research. Engaging in customer service online creates a history of those conversations for others to view when looking for a service, which could draw new clients to the professional's business.

pic-2Social Listening
Monitoring what people are saying about the spa on social media platforms is called social listening. Fostering conversations across social media also allows professionals another avenue to listen to their clients and gain important insight into what people think of their business. Clients will share both positive and negative experiences, which will help the professional understand what is going well in their business and what they can improve upon.

For example, the professional might see multiple clients raving about one product or service and consistently complaining about another. The professional may want to find ways to expand the service that is getting great reviews and reevaluate what is receiving criticism. The professional might find that a particular employee consistently receives positive feedback for going the extra mile; find out what that employee is doing and encourage the rest of the staff to do the same.

Negative feedback is not always so obvious. Take note of posts that receive high engagement and compare them to posts that receive little-to-no engagement. High engagement is telling of what is popular among clients, while low engagement will show the converse. Finding a common denominator between high-engagement posts can help determine what clients are most interested in hearing about. The professional can then apply that information to the rest of their social media content.

MANAGING CUSTOMER SERVICE ON SOCIAL MEDIA
Putting in the Time
Managing customer service on social media requires a time commitment. The professional will need to dedicate resources to manage their accounts; someone has to post content, answer questions, and respond to any feedback. This time commitment does not mean the spa needs to have a staff member solely dedicated to social media, but they will need to have someone, or multiple people, responsible for monitoring their channels on a regular basis. Some businesses have one person that regularly monitors their social platforms, while others rotate the responsibility between multiple staff members. The amount of time spent monitoring the accounts will depend on the number of social media platforms being utilized, the size of the spa's following, and the amount of engagement from clients. The best advice is to start slowly. Pick one or two social platforms to use when getting started. The professional will be able to dedicate more time to each of them and better gauge what the overall time commitment will need to be.

Real Time Responses
One of the most important things to remember about social media is that it is immediate. When someone goes on social media, they are looking for instant gratification – a quick response to their question, an acknowledgment of their complaint, or even a "like" to their positive feedback. Businesses that are the most successful on social media acknowledge any comments as quickly as possible, even if they have to follow up with more information later.

Addressing Concerns and Negative Feedback
After a negative experience, people often turn to social media to either share their experience or look for a resolution to their issue. When the professional receives this type of communication, whether it is through a comment, review, or direct message, the best thing for them to do is acknowledge the client's concern in a timely manner. Even if the professional is not able to immediately answer the client's question or solve their problem, a quick response makes the client feel heard and goes a long way in resolving an issue positively. The professional should let the client know they are looking into the concern and will follow up with the full answer or resolution once they have it. It is also essential to thank them for their feedback, which not only shows the client that the spa wants to correct the situation, but also shows anyone else who sees the online interaction that client satisfaction is of the utmost importance.

Taking Customer Service Offline
Many customer service questions can be answered directly on the platform in which they are asked: operational hours, availability of a particular product, and whether or not a service is being offered. If the question can be answered thoroughly and concisely without additional information from the client, respond directly on the platform. Clients see the professional as the expert and are seeking their advice, but too many details can make the professional's response muddled and confusing.

However, the professional will run into issues that are better resolved in private messages or offline. These issues include anything that requires getting more information from the client, such as questions about which products they should be using to issues that would better be resolved over the phone, like a complaint about negative results from a service. When these issues come up, the professional can send the client a private message on the platform on which they reached out to them, or can ask the client for their contact information so the professional can reach out to them directly about the issue. Either way, be sure to acknowledge the action they are taking publically so others will see that they responded to the issue. For example: "Hi Katie. We are sorry to hear about your experience – that is definitely not typical. We would like to get some additional information from you so we can help resolve the issue. Look out for a private message from us. Thanks." The professional can also say, "Hi Katie. Thank you for your feedback. We'd like to reach out to you directly so we can solve your issue. We've sent you a private message asking for your e-mail address so we can contact you there. Thanks."

Engaging with Positive Feedback
Social media is not all about managing negative customer service complaints. There is plenty of positivity to go around. Clients also love to share what they love about businesses, such as awesome results from services, positive interactions with employees, and overall great experiences with the spa. Just as the professional acknowledges criticism and negative feedback, they should also acknowledge the praise they receive too. If a client leaves a comment thanking their aesthetician for their latest treatment, reply with, "Thanks for coming in! We always love to see you!" If a client shares a picture of their clear skin thanks to a series of treatments and homecare products, like the picture and leave a comment thanking them for sharing and telling them how wonderful and healthy their skin looks.

Finding Your Voice
Social media should be used as an extension of the professional's brand, be it large or small, so do not lose sight of the spa's voice. When posting or engaging with clients, channel the brand through a human voice; be relaxed, but professional. Customize responses like the client is being spoken to face-to-face. Using a familiar voice not only strengthens the professional's branding, but also helps clients feel more comfortable and loyal.

Surprise and Delight
While responding to clients on social platforms is very important, professionals also have the opportunity to give those clients who take the extra time to talk to them online something extra. This surprise will make clients feel special and encourage them to continue engaging with the professional on social media. For example, if one of the clients shares a picture on the spa's Facebook page after every chemical peel to show the professional, and all of her social media followers, her glowing results, the professional might consider giving her a free product when she comes in for her next treatment. The professional can comment on the post telling her that, as a thank you, something special is waiting for her the next time she comes in, so not only she sees that she is getting something, but others do as well, which also encourages them to post.


THE LOGISTICS: HOW TO MONITOR AND RESPONDpic-3
While the main principles of social media customer service apply to all platforms, the specific tactics of monitoring and responding vary by channel.

Facebook
There are multiple ways clients may communicate with the professional on Facebook. Clients may leave a comment or image directly on the spa's wall or they may send a private message. The professional can easily monitor both avenues directly on Facebook. When the professional is logged into their business page, they will receive a notification within the Facebook page when someone has posted directly to their wall, when they receive a message, or when someone comments on, likes, or shares one of their posts. The professional can also change their settings to add more users to the business page and receive e-mail or push notifications to the mobile phone.

Once the professional receives a notification, they can respond directly to the comment on their computer or on their mobile device within the Facebook Page Manager mobile application. To make this process easier, the professional can get push notifications to their mobile device to know immediately when someone is interacting with them on Facebook.

Instagram
On Instagram, clients may comment directly on the professional's posts, send them a direct message, or mention them in a picture they are posting. The professional can monitor comments, direct messages, and mentions of their Instagram account directly within the mobile application. Much like Facebook, the professional will receive notifications of all new activity when logged into their account. While the professional cannot post pictures from the website, Instagram does allow them to respond to comments and messages on both the computer and within the mobile application. However, Instagram will only show the professional the most recent notifications, meaning comments and mentions can get buried and lost. Be sure to scroll through the posts to check for recent comments that may have been missed. Outside platforms, such as Iconosquare, are also helpful with tracking engagements on Instagram.

Twitter
Clients may contact the professional on Twitter by responding to a tweet, sending a direct message, or mentioning the professional in a tweet they are sharing. Monitoring Twitter activity within the platform can be difficult because it moves so quickly. When someone engages with the professional directly, the professional will receive a notification in the Notifications tab. Most businesses and brands choose to use a management tool to track their Twitter activity, such as TweetDeck or HootSuite. These platforms allow the professional to not only track all of their notifications in one place, but also track keywords people might be using about their business. This tool comes in handy if someone shares a tweet that includes the name of their business without tagging the business' Twitter handle. The professional can respond to clients directly on the computer, in the mobile application, or from a management tool if they are using one. Both TweetDeck and Hootsuite also have mobile applications, so the professional can respond on their mobile device.

Engaging with clients on social media is well worth the time and commitment to build the brand's presence and connect with clients. Showing clients that the professional cares about any and all feedback makes them feel connected to the professional and the spa, and not only makes them more willing to come back, but also more likely to refer a friend.

kelley-MooreKelley Moore is the digital media manager at PCA SKIN. She has a background working both on and offline with consumer retail brands in multiple industries. With a focus on content development, consumer communication, and customer engagement, she specializes in creating connections between consumers and brands.



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By Jeremy | January 16, 2019

The International Congress of Esthetics and Spa (ICES) held its third and fourth tradeshows of the year on September 20th and 21st in Long Beach, Calif. and October 25th and 26th in Philadelphia, Pa. Beautiful skies and agreeable weather greeted aestheticians, educators, massage therapists, hair removal specialists, and makeup artists for these annual, two-day events.

The moment the tradeshow doors opened, attendees burst onto the floor, barely able to contain their love and passion for the industry and the products that shape the industry. Exhibitors were more than eager to quench the hunger for knowledge and product education that the attendees displayed. Exhibitors were grateful for the opportunity to create relationships and fill the attendee's bags with their products.

Michelle D'Allaird-Brenner graciously hosted General Session in both Long Beach and Philadelphia and started each show by greeting and welcoming attendees on behalf of tradeshow producers, DERMASCOPE Magazine and Les Nouvelles Esthetiques and Spa. In Long Beach, General Session was sponsored by Circadia by Dr. Pugliese™ and Bella Schneider Beauty. In Philadelphia, General Session was sponsored by Circadia by Dr. Pugliese and Satin Smooth. These sessions saw lectures and demonstrations on popular topics and techniques by yogis, aestheticians, acupuncturists, spa owners, massage therapists, and institute directors. These lectures and demonstrations allow attendees to learn from the best and advance their careers. The schedule included the following topics:

 

Long Beach 2015

Sunday, September 20th, 2015:
• Breathe Beautiful: Breath Techniques for Beauty and Radiance (Motivational) by EuGene Grant
• Harisienne Method: The Sting-Free Acupuncture Facial (Demonstration) by Michiko Mitsumoto and Mana Hirabayashi
• Waxing is Relaxing: Create a Spa-Like Experience (Lecture/Demonstration) by Lydia Sarfati
• Stalks of Prosperity: The Bamboo Massage (Demonstration) by Nathalie Cecilia, L.M.T.
• Combine and Layer Peels for Maximum Results! (Lecture/Demonstration) by Tina Zillmann, L.E., CLHRP

mm1

Monday, September 21st, 2015:
• Stretch Yourself, Stretch Your Sales: Yogic Stretching for Magnetism (Motivational) by EuGene Grant
• Designer Facials for Your Individual Client's Needs (Demonstration) by Bella Schneider
• Power Up! Take Your Clients' Experience to the Next Level (Lecture) by Annet King
• Restoring the Flow of Energy: "The Kansa" Face Lift (Demonstration) by Melanie Sachs

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Philadelphia 2015 Recap
Sunday, October 25th, 2015
• Breathe Beautiful: Breath Techniques for Beauty and Radiance (Motivational) by EuGene Grant
• Strengthening Spa Treatment Customization with Double Masking (Demonstration) by Boldijarre Koronczay
• Revolutionizing Skin Peel (Lecture) by Christine Heathman
• Welcomed Friction: Dry Brushing at the Spa (Demonstration) by Mary Turner
• Our Personal Ecosystems: Skin's Microbiome (Lecture) by Rebecca Gadberry

Monday, October 26th, 2015
• Stretch Yourself, Stretch Your Sales: Yogic Stretching for Magnetism (Motivational) by EuGene Grant
• Designer Facials for Your Individual Client's Needs (Demonstration) by Bella Schneider
• Skin and Aging: What Do We Really Know? (Lecture) by Michael Pugliese
• Restoring the Flow of Energy: "The Kansa" Face Lift (Demonstration) by Melanie Sachs
• Create the Ultimate Eyelashes (Demonstration) by Ingrid Gagné

Attendees were offered a wealth of information that they were able to use to supplement their current techniques, further their education, and take back to their own clients. This array of highly innovative speakers verifies that ICES tradeshows contain the utmost educators, manufacturers, and distributors.

The stunning number of classes offered at the by ICES at these two tradeshows, both the general session and the product focused training, ensured that every attendee was able to find learning experience that peaked their interest.

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DERMASCOPE Magazine would like to extend our greatest gratitude to all who made this event possible, from educators and exhibitors to attendees and sponsors. We look forward to seeing you in 2016.

DERMASCOPE Magazine and Les Nouvelles Esthetiques & Spa co-produce four International Congress of Esthetics & Spa educational conferences/tradeshows annually in Miami, Fla.; Dallas, Texas; Philadelphia, Pa.; and Long Beach, Calif. Dates for the 2016 International Congress of Esthetics & Spa conferences are Philadelphia, Pa. on April 10th and 11th, Dallas, Texas on May 15th and 16th, Long Beach, Calif. on September 11th and 12th, and Miami, Fla. on November 6th and 7th.



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By Jeremy Lawrence | January 16, 2019

Over and over we read it: men are still the untouched client wealth for day spa operators. According to various news reports and industry surveys, men represent anywhere from five to 30 percent of the day spa market. While these statistics are often unclear about the exact types of services and products to which men are primarily attracted, it is clear that there is business opportunity in the male spa customer.

As a spa business consultant, many of my clients stress the desire to build a better volume in male clients. The reasons range from an expected growth in sales revenue to something as simple as, “It would be fun to have more men in the spa!” Whatever the motivation for expanding into the male spa customer market, it is obvious that a strategy is required to achieve that result.

In my work as both consultant and skin care clinic operator, I like to look at every new spa business growth idea as a separate business plan – that is, examining the potential cost and value of the concept in advance of actually investing time and money into the effort. I do the same whether a spa is considering a physical expansion, the purchase of a piece of treatment equipment, or the introduction of a new product line. Knowing something about the risks and rewards of any business decision is just, well, good business! And while no one could argue that more customers is not a positive thing for the spa, there does exist the possibility that a similar or even smaller investment in one’s present customers could yield a better financial return. This consideration aside for now, let us explore how to bait the hook for a more robust male spa trade.

in-the-worksUnderstanding “The Man”
All men begin as boys and boys are raised with very different notions about grooming than girls. Few boys are found reading fashion and beauty magazines, trying on clothing outfits in front of mirrors or dreaming about the visual details of a future wedding. Boys are more externally focused (sports, work, achievement, and so on) and are not personally or culturally encouraged to veer far from those pursuits. Any mother of a young son knows what a struggle it can be just to get him to bathe or brush his teeth. The boy just does not seem to feel the need for such frivolous things. Thus, it is important to remember that man is emerging from the boy’s training (or lack thereof). While he has probably learned that improved hygiene and appearance can enhance his job and romance competitiveness, he may engage in it only to the degree that he feels will make a critical difference, and then he stops there. No wonder so many female online dating profiles include the demand, “Good oral hygiene is a MUST!” Evidently, there is some known need for men to do a better job at this. Most men do not feel the desire or pressure to maintain the high standard of personal looks that women desire. While men are not held to all of the unfair cultural and Madison Avenue manipulations forced upon women to stay young, thin, and beautiful, men are increasingly subject to higher appearance standards (much of it generated by more independent females).
And then there is still the prevailing fear among your average man that any attention paid to how he looks might suggest a compromise in his sexual orientation. Even the most liberal of men will not want to be misunderstood when it comes to the definition of his manhood. And any experienced spa owner or service provider has witnessed the insecure awkwardness of the first-visit man in this decidedly girly world. He can be stiff, unsure, guarded, and suspicious. He is the female talking to the greasy mechanic at the muffler shop – all he wants to do is get what he came for and leave, especially if the spa appointment was gifted to him by a wife or girlfriend. That loving gift could be measured in increments of torture by the average male.
There are also other types of men who will find personal grooming and relaxation not only a joy, but a valued commitment in a healthy lifestyle. He is confident in himself, friendly, and affable and does not need to be dragged kicking into the spa. This man likes the services you offer (some more than others) and is an agreeable product customer. Your guy is easy to work with, keeps his appointments and is a nice contrast in your usual all-girl schedule. What spa owner would not want more of them? Trouble is they are just too few and far between. How and where do you find these guys?
What is the takeaway from all this? Your target guy will likely prove to be just a little difficult to pull into the spa. With that in mind, we will look at the best methods for attracting, keeping, and retailing to the male customer.

Smart Marketing: The Lures That Work Best with Men
When you think of the male customer, it is best to start from the reality of who he is and what he does with regard to self-care services. If you have a hair salon connected to the spa, then that is probably an easier way to attract him. You want to spend your marketing time and money wisely. Men also enjoy massage treatments, so that would be your second best service to promote to him. With facials, it gets a little more challenging, especially in suburban and rural areas where male grooming culture and values are, say, a bit more traditional. On average, the percentage of men representing an aesthetician’s clientele is typically less than 10 percent, usually a lot less. Some urban aestheticians successfully cater to a decidedly gay male market, but that, too, represents a rather small and type-specific sliver of the facial business as a whole.

what-guys-likeThe Spa Environment: What Guys Like
Over the years I have read endless articles explaining how to attract men to a spa. Many of the strategies promoted suggest that unless men see NFL posters, see lots of heavy black and brown leather furniture or smell bacon frying, the guys are not going to feel “like a man” in your business. This simply is not true for most of us guys. While lots of feminine color, textures, names and décor will make a guy sense that he may have wandered into the wrong bathroom, you do not have to make your spa look like an oil change garage to make us feel at home. Gender neutral works just fine for us. Men like warm tones, rich textures and stone, the sound of running water, so long as it is not coming from the mouths of cute little cupid statues – nature over nurture. Use warm scents such as sandalwood or citrus as aromatherapy choices instead of more green or sweeter scents.

And while many savvy spa and skin care salon owners have their own success stories with attracting the male customer, here is my priority list when it comes to developing business with men:

  1. Using his head. Even the most macho of guys will submit to having his locks lopped. If your spa offers hair services, this may be the best place to start your marketing campaign. Once he is in the door and is comfortable with your business, your stylists and spa brochures can take it from there. Offer him a service list to read during his haircut and train your team to enthusiastically talk about your other service departments. “Do you ever have skin care treatments, Mike? Lots of guys who come here do.” You can even offer him a complimentary consultation or treatment just to get him familiar with the culture and feel of facial treatments and products. He cannot buy what he does not know exists.
  2. Go for the body. Most spas report that their number one male preferred service is massage therapy. Whether it is to relieve sports pain or just to throw off some workday tension, men have sought out massage treatments since before Roman times. We guys tend to relate to these treatments more mechanically, so be sure to emphasize the physical benefits over a relaxed, soothing experience. Since most men will quickly scan over your spa menu, you might want to have a single sheet marketing piece that describes your massage treatments separate from your other services. Make sure every guy with whom you work receives one.
  3. Get the girl. One of the best ways to get him into the spa is through her – the spouse, girlfriend or daughter who feels their guy could use a little tender, love and care. Romantic spa twosomes, Father’s Day gifts, birthday presents – all of these are great opportunities for compelling men to try a spa service. Send out holiday e-mail blasts that remind your female customers to think of you when they think of him.
  4. Get the guy to get the girl. A spa customer is anyone doing any sort of business with you. In my experience, by far, the most valuable male customer was one buying a gift for someone special in his life – mom, girlfriend, sister, fiancée. So while the gift certificate may be for someone other than the guy purchasing it, he is in fact your true customer. And because men like to solve problems quickly (choosing a gift for a woman is always one of them), what is well received from him will be repeated again and again. Create an e-mail list that is men-specific for marketing your spa services as wise gift selections, and then make it easy for him to buy them. Gift card programs are the best way and there are many of them available to help you grow these valuable sales!
  5. Go where the boys are. If you choose to employ conventional advertising in your marketing plan, remember to place your advertisements where men tend to read. Consider sports or business magazines and websites. Knocking on his “Do not forget Valentine’s Day!” reminder door while he is checking out the weekend game schedule can be very valuable to your gift certificate sales.

The same is true about other male-specific notions of what guys prefer or need in order to patronize a spa. While your experience may be different than mine, hosting a men’s night event at the spa will be about as well attended as a picnic in a hurricane. Again, the idea that men attract men usually falls flat as a spa promotion. Most men do not see the day spa as a cultural experience, but as a place to go for the service they want. They do not want to hang out for long either before or after. And male-centric spa products? Those can be another expensive dead end if you are hoping that men will flock to them on their own.

"Men will do just about anything you ask if you can make easy sense of what he is doing and why."

It is best not to put men on display in an environment dominated by women customers. While you do not have to provide a baseball dugout just to seat the waiting male client, putting him in the middle of a busy hair salon full of female clients covered in foils is not his idea of a great time. If you provide magazines, make sure there are a few that men enjoy reading. Car, business, and sports publications are best because no matter how good it may look, we are not going to tear that zesty summer orange cake recipe from your Ladies’ Home Journal. Tailgate barbeque tips in Sports Illustrated are a more likely read.
If you have a special men’s lounge in your spa, it is great to have a television screen with a sports game playing on it, even a car race. Men like thick terry or velour robes and slippers are fine, too, so long as they are neutral in color and correctly sized. Yes, we will drink cucumber water and eat energy bars, too – buffalo jerky is not necessary. Do not seat men face to face, though. Men like their independent way of communicating and do not like to be forced to look at one another in unfamiliar settings. Guys also have a habit of expanding their posture to take up space (some sort of primitive defensive mechanism thing hammered into us), so scale your lounge furniture accordingly.

the-male-clientThe Service Department: Treating the Male Client
I will let you in on a little secret you probably know already: We men are a lot more sensitive and delicate than we let on. While guys will take a beating on the football field and shoulder heavy work, just try doing a few extractions on his nose during a facial treatment – he is not going to love it. This is not to suggest that men have to be handled with hyper-caution when treating them, but because they are often less familiar with the methods in a facial procedure it is best to walk him through the various stages of it as you go. It is sometimes suggested that women are less pain sensitive when it comes to beauty services, but women are also more invested in the results of those services and may be willing to put up with a lot of discomfort in order to get them. With massage therapy, guys enjoy a firmer hand on those dense, sore muscles, so that is the time a technician can really go for it. Remember, men are more solution-oriented and are much more concerned about addressing immediate needs (acne, muscle tension, back pain, and so on) than they are about the future development of crow’s feet or hyperpigmentation. Involve him when you are planning his treatments and never assume that he knows as much about your work as your female clients know.
We men tend to feel warmer in our bodies than women feel. It is an old story in shared working office environment that men feel good at temperatures that make their female counterparts shiver. The office thermostat can become a gender battleground. Male clients may not like being bundled up in lots of warm blankets and heated hand mitts – a thin sheet covering during treatments may do the trick just fine.
Be especially aware of a guy’s beard area during a facial service. Dragging sponges or disposable cloth against the beard growth is really uncomfortable for us, though we may not tell you so when enduring it. Feel out the resistance pattern on a man’s face before treating it and follow the direction of it. You will not only make him feel better, but will help to avoid post-treatment follicular irritation as well.
Retaining your male client is a fairly simple job: find out what his concerns are and then tell him what to do about them! Men do not like to be offered lots of options when it comes to their service selection, particularly when we are not skilled in making decisions among them. Instead of saying, “If you like, you could come in more often for massage treatments,” say, “Here is what I would like for you to do to deal with your muscle soreness: let us see you once a week for the next four weeks and we will do a deep tissue program that will steadily restore your comfort. Can we schedule that now?” He is much more likely to commit to a program that is laid out for him and promises a clear solution for what he perceives as an immediate problem.
Subtle encouragement can also work to keep a guy in the spa. If he is married or dating, you can reward his facial routine by letting him know how much women love the feel of smooth skin on their guy. If he has a blackhead problem, it is useful to praise him for dealing with it by saying, “Women really notice those small details on a guy’s face.” He will get the message.

Retail Reality
The same “command style” communication method is ideal when advising men on a home care plan. Short, simple, and clear is best when setting up a guy with his grooming regimen. Men will do just about anything you ask if you can make easy sense of what he is doing and why. For the face, you will do best with products that address cleansing, shaving, moisture retention, blackhead control, and sun protection. Again, no options here – just direct instructions and a confident choice of products by you, the authority. “Here is what I would like for you to do: Use this scrubbing cleanser with warm water day and night and focus on the nose and forehead to keep those blackheads under control. It also works well as a pre-shave lubricant. During the day, wear this sunscreen so you do not burn and risk aging the skin faster. In the evening use this moisturizer instead of the sunscreen to keep that skin feeling smooth instead of dried out.” Trust me, he will appreciate the directness, the simplicity, and the brevity of your suggestion. And he will buy! Most men will not know or care about the science behind your product line. If you have body products that help relieve muscle soreness, this is your customer!

"Most men do not see the day spa as a cultural experience, but as a place to go for the service they want."

Another thing: The idea that you need a male-specific hair or skin care line in order to successfully sell to them is not true. If your products do not have a distinctly feminine look, name or scent, you are just fine with those alone. The one exception may be shaving products, but even those can be provided by your gender-neutral cleansers. If you have been in the skin care business long enough, you have already heard from your female clients how their men use up their face wash and moisturizer in the bathroom.
One last thought about the male customer as a target market for your spa or treatment practice: you may want to ask yourself from a strictly business perspective whether or not men are the best investment of your advertising and inventory dollars. Look at it this way: your best clients are those who use the widest selection of your beauty services, buy the most home care products, and talk up your treatments with friends and family who represent referral opportunities. From that perspective, would these customers be men or women? Or if you had only one opening in your schedule and had a new male and female client trying to get it, whom would you prefer to serve? We are not talking about gender discrimination here but just simple ecomonic logic. Would a hairstylist prefer a child’s haircut over a female color client? Would a makeup department spend a great deal of money trying to find men who will buy its bronzer sun block? Do restaurants aggressively market to customers who are non-drinkers? A spa or personal service practice is a business first and everything else after that. No matter who you serve, you need to make the most money possible from each scheduled client. And while we like working with both genders, I think about my financial needs above all else – the main thing that keeps my doors open in order to serve anybody. Some food for thought.


douglas.preston.headshotDouglas Preston’s career spans 32 years in professional aesthetics, education and skin care career mentoring. Preston’s business articles appear in DERMASCOPE, Spa Management Journal, Les Nouvelles Esthetiques, among others. He is past-president of Aesthetics International Association and former committee chairman for The Day Spa Association. Preston was named The Day Spa Association’s “Spa Person of the Year” in January 2006 and voted Favorite Spa Consultant in American Spa’s 2006 readers’ poll. His recently published book, An Esthetician’s Guide to Growing a Successful Skincare Career, is a top-seller with aesthetics professionals. douglas@prestonskincare.com



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By Jeremy Lawrence | January 16, 2019

Successfully running and operating a small business in today’s dynamic world of beauty brands and outlets is no simple feat. Salon owners are tasked with doing it all. Running the day-to-day operations, dealing with staffing issues like turnover, marketing the business, and staying ahead of the latest technologies/techniques to keep your customers looking and feeling their best can be hectic.
As a successful salon owner and product manufacturer who has experienced my fair share of ups and downs through consistent fast paced growth, I have learned a lot along the way that might help others navigate the choppy waters ahead on the road to success. My hope is that these tips will help fuel and energize growth for some small business owners, while helping others sustain the success they have already achieved.

The Culture Club

The importance of culture is an oft-overlooked element of brand building in the beauty industry. I am not just talking about having great employee benefits or bringing treats for staff meetings. Culture is how your team embodies your salon’s vision. So let us start at the beginning. All business owners should have a mission statement and supporting values that define the kind of business you desire and how you want to run it. Values such as collegiality and sharing, recognizing employees’ contributions, fostering trust and encouraging employees to lead a balanced life are all great places to start.
Once you have defined your mission and values, you can begin living that mission and influencing the culture that impacts your entire team and customers. After all, it begins with the salon’s leadership. You want this crew to model the attitude that all your employees should have. Once your leadership team is marching to the beat of the same drum, you can begin running the day-to-day business according to those shared values.

successHere are some additional tips to help you establish a culture that breeds success:

  • Set and monitor performance and development goals for your entire team. When it comes to your staff, assign specific accountabilities, set realistic objectives and communicate priorities – this makes everyone feel like they are a part of achieving your mission.
  • Focus on what is best and then on what is next, rather than dwelling on the negative or obstacles to your success. This shift in focus helps foster an accountable success-oriented environment.
  • Find opportunities to mentor and develop employees to help them achieve work-life balance and their personal goals. A happy team equals happy customers!
  • Have an open door policy where everyone has access to the leadership team. Every member of my staff knows that they can always call, e-mail or text the leadership team 24/7.
  • Schedule regular meetings to remind everyone of their short- and long-term goals and help people stay focused on achieving the results you have prioritized. Dedicate time in these meetings to recognize success and invite team members to ask questions and provide speedy and complete information to your team. Invite participation at every turn to build trust.
  • Work with purpose! People want to be a part of something bigger than just a job. Giving back is the perfect opportunity to get everyone involved. We try and get as many people involved in our philanthropic efforts as possible. Our efforts include everything from a 24-hour wax-a-thon to block parties, to simply delivering holiday gifts to those in need. In my salons we have a philanthropy task force and they are responsible for leading our efforts and coordinating with philanthropy partners.
  • Seek out ways to surprise and delight your team – not just your customers. For instance, we deliver every employee a personalized birthday cake on their special day and post a picture on Facebook.
  • It is worth noting that when it comes to fostering a high-performing culture, one that not only promotes employee fulfillment, client satisfaction, and repeat business, that a healthy work environment is crucial. If employees are happy, it shows. If employees are unhappy, this shows as well. Taking some of these small steps today to achieve a productive culture will pay off for years down the road. 

Know Where You Are Going… And How You Are Going to Get There

networking-marketingAnother crucial tip for success in any industry is goal setting – for everything! The beauty industry is no different. Simply running a profitable business is not what I am talking about. You have to get specific – what do you really want to achieve with your business?
Goal setting is imperative on a professional and a personal level. When I started my salon business in 2007, my goal was to have three locations by 2013. We achieved that goal a year early. As soon as we opened our third salon, I was already looking ahead to the next project. Now, my five-year goal is to have 20 profitable locations and get into one of the countries premiere national beauty retailers.
Goals set the speed of a business. Without a goal, it is easy to get lost in the day-to-day operations of running a salon. With a goal, employees are focused on moving forward, and on fueling their own personal growth. Personally, each time I meet a goal, I feel immediate complacency and have to set a new one to feel motivated. One winning philosophy – what gets measured, gets done! The simple act of paying attention to something will cause you to make connections you never did previously, and you will improve in those areas, almost without any extra effort.
In a meeting at the beginning of this year, we invited everyone on our team to describe their personal one-, five- and 10-year goals. This allowed us to understand one another better and be given the opportunity to encourage and support one another in reaching those goals.
Public goal setting is not just a warm-and-fuzzy tactic to make staffers feel good. In order to achieve the vision you have for your business, it is critical that employees have a clear understanding of the roles and responsibilities expected of them. Equally important is when you hit a big milestone, be sure to celebrate as a team.

Do Not Just Keep Up, Skyrocket Ahead of the Competition

You are probably now expecting tips for how to take down your top three competitors. My experience is not paying attention to your competition is the best way to get ahead. Sure, we are all competing for the same clients in our individual markets and there will always be competitors vying for those same customers’ disposable income. But I challenge all small business owners: if you want to win, stay focused on your own vision. Remember your goals. And know that no other business shares your goals or your path to success. Besides, when you focus on looking ahead, you do not have time to look in the rearview mirror at what others are doing.

"All business owners should have a mission statement and supporting values that define the kind of business you desire and how you want to run it. Values such as collegiality and sharing, recognizing employees’ contributions, fostering trust and encouraging employees to lead a balanced life are all great places to start."

If you really want to stay ahead of the pack, marketing is another large and critical piece of the puzzle. You would be hard pressed to find two salon/spa owners who share the same beliefs about marketing. After all, every city and each specialty within our industry has its own nuances and quirks that make certain marketing tactics resonate with consumers, while others fall flat.
Typically, word-of-mouth tends to be the number one marketing trick-of-the-trade in the beauty industry. After all, clients who walk away looking or feeling better than they did before coming into your business are more likely to tell their friends about the amazing cut and color, skin treatment, brow shaping, or massage, that they just have to try.
A lot of business owners think that word-of-mouth is just something that happens. The truth is that you actually have much more control over it than you think. For example, my salons perpetuate word-of-mouth buzz by bending over backwards to be sure we are surprising and delighting every customer who walks through our doors. We offer guests a discount on our most popular service when they book regularly. Our regulars also receive a discount when they bring in a new guest; the new guest receives the same discount, too. These efforts helped us amass a fiercely loyal following that allows us to keep business booked without having to do much else in terms of paid marketing.
mission-statementThere are some basic customer service elements that no salon owner should overlook – offer guests a premium beverage (wine and champagne are always a hit!); have tasty snacks and high quality reading materials. If guests want to do a little shopping before or after their treatment, we offer complimentary gift wrapping. These things may seem like a given, but you would be surprised at how little details can get lost when you are just focusing on the day-to-day operations of running a bustling salon, especially during busy times of the year.
marketing-planPamper your guests so that they do not just delight in the experience you create for them, but because you have put the right team in place to ensure expert customer service, they have come to expect it every time.
While traditional marketing efforts have their place in the mix (such as print advertisements, paid search, and so on), word-of-mouth buzz delivers the highest return on investment (ROI), especially over time.
Rather than your standard run-of-the-mill advertisement on a park bench or the local neighborhood newspaper, winning an award as the best salon in your city or being included in a local gift guide will go a lot further in convincing potential customers to discover their next favorite salon.

“If you want to win, stay focused on your own vision. Remember your goals. And know that no other business shares your goals or your path to success.”

A final word on the subject of marketing – do not underestimate the value of partnering with like-minded businesses. Look for local high-end hotels, sports clubs and studios, clothing boutiques that cater to the same clientele. Look for opportunities to partner up on giveaways, special events, sponsorships or a simple client referral program. These efforts can bring your business’ brand into the spotlight that it deserves, staying for the foreseeable future and beyond.


Shannon Conley is an experienced aesthetician with more than 17 years of experience in the skin care, spa and salon industry. As founder and owner of Urban Waxx – a unique salon concept completely focused on waxing and over the top customer service with three locations in Portland, Oregon – Conley has experienced a period of rapid growth since starting her business in 2007. She has also found success in product development with the launch of Serious Serum, the best all natural, AHA ingrown hair eliminator and skin exfoliant on the market. shannon@urbanwaxx.com, www.urbanwaxx.com or www.seriousserum.com



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By | January 16, 2019


As a young girl, time seemed to go by at such a slow pace. While in elementary school, I wished to be in intermediate; while in junior high, I could not wait to be in high school; and ironically by the time I was in high school, I was counting down the days until I graduated. Then, in what seemed like a blink of an eye, I found myself wondering where the time went and wishing that I could regain some of the time I lost.

In fact, it does not seem fair how time speeds up when you want it to slow down and slows down when you wish for it to speed up. A prime example can be made of birthdays. For a child, one's birthday is a joyous event. From counting down the days to the party, the favors, the cake and the presents they can barely contain their enthusiasm.
Unfortunately, the love of birthdays begins to diminish over time and whether it is in your 30s, 40s, 50s or 60s the thrill of counting down the days no longer exists. Instead the focus is on not looking your age, unlike when as a child you could not wait to proclaim your age as thirteen instead of twelve.
However, now the focus of an adult is on how to age gracefully, and as Eric Hoffer said, "The best part of the art of living is to know how to grow old gracefully." Daily, weekly, or even monthly, clients visit spas and salons to slow down the hands of time. They want the best treatments and fastest products to tackle those pesky wrinkles and sagging skin. DERMASCOPE's goal is to provide the most advanced and relevant information available in the industry. Within this month's issue, we have provided you with articles authored by experts in the aesthetic industry. From Melanie Sach's article on Self-Abhyanga to Thomas Boersma's article on attracting clients from the older generations, each article gives an in-depth view of the author's knowledge on age management and how, as aesthetic professionals, you can assist them with growing old gracefully.

"Nothing is inherently and invincibly young except spirit. And spirit can enter a human being perhaps better in the quiet of old age and dwell there more undisturbed than in the turmoil of adventure."
~ George Santayana

Please feel free to contact me at amckay@dermascope.com; your suggestions and comments are welcome. I look forward to hearing from you!

Best regards,

amy-mckay-sig



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By | January 16, 2019

Ihave two hobbies; the first is reading and the second is cake decorating. Granted I have limited time for either considering I am a wife, mother, and work full time outside the home to which I am sure many of you can relate. Mostly my cake decorating is limited to birthday and baby shower cakes for family and friends. But it is something I love to do! I love the creativity, the challenge, the stress, and ultimately the finished product.
I began this hobby eight years ago when I decorated my first cake – Spongebob Squarepants for my sweet little boy. I was five months pregnant and it took me nine hours from start to finish. My whole body ached and I was sure that it was my first and last time to ever decorate a cake. But the smile on his face and the gigantic, bear hug that came next was all the motivation I needed to overcome my hesitation. I have since taken classes to learn how to use the proper tools and established relationships with other bakers/decorators and found a few websites where I can research ideas and seek advice from others on the various techniques/tricks required to create certain decorations or cakes. The last time I made Spongebob it only took me two hours to decorate.
Without a doubt, practice and the use of proper tools and techniques have made all the difference in my decorating; certainly in time consumption but also in the enjoyment of it and the results. The same is of course true for your business, and you are your business regardless of where you work. If you tried to do an exfoliation treatment without some form of exfoliant, how effective would you be? Not very, right? So, do you believe it is effective or even possible to grow as a skin care professional and expand your knowledge base if you do not establish relationships and correspond regularly with other professionals, attend trade shows, or advanced education classes? Well, if you are reading this you obviously do not believe that is a possibility. What more do you do besides reading one or two journals each month?
There was a time where your options were limited to professional journals and one or two trade shows each year combined with product training from your manufacturer. Today, that is no longer the case. There are a multitude of journals to choose from and an unfathomable number of tradeshows and advanced education classes each year. Aside from those traditional methods of learning, you now must factor in that the entire world is accessible at your fingertips. Make no mistake; journals are still an excellent resource for a more concentrated look at a certain topic. However, once you embrace the newest tool in your arsenal – the Internet and truly put it to work for you, your horizons will expand infinitely. Instead of one mentor, you can have as many as you want. Read everything they have published and everything that has been published about them. Establish a relationship with them and pick their brain. Become a mentor yourself. Often you learn more by teaching, than by doing.
Don’t know where to start? DERMASCOPE created AestheticsProfessional.com. Here you will find community among your colleagues and the doorway into the future of professional networking. I look forward to chatting with each of you online!

Best,
Saundra, Dermascope Magazine, Skin Care Magazine

Saundra



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By | January 16, 2019

by Mary Van

 

Accentuate the positive! The hot new trend this spring is to accent one feature. It's not about not minimizing make-up but having fun with eyes, lips, or cheekbones in a playful way. Don't be shy, find that best feature and show it off!

Let's start at the top. Bangs are back. If you haven't had bangs for a while, now's the time. Short, blunt, cut bangs that rest at the top of the brows or even cover the brows are really hot this spring. If you can't wear them straight, try sweeping your bangs to the side and slightly layered. They take a little less effort to grow back and will blend into your hair easily with a lot less commitment. The benefits of bangs are that it is much cheaper than Botox! Bangs should be soft and feathered whether you choose to wear them straight down or swept off to the side.

Next, let those brows grow back. Full, defined brows are back in style. Brush your brows up and out. Fill brows in with a brow powder in sparse areas. If you do not have brows, you'll need to draw in a soft, natural brow line with a full appearance. If your brow hair does not want to re-emerge, try dabbing a little Women's Rogaine on using a cotton swab.

Look for Shimmering Shades. If you choose to emphasize your eyes, go with metallics. Gold and silver and all shades in between are colors you'll want to have in your makeup kit. Don't wait to wear them at night; shimmer is hot for daytime wear. Choose two colors: one for the lid shade, carrying it into the crease, and another for the highlight. Be sure to line your eyes. Select the darkest shade of shimmer and wet an eyeliner brush to line your eyes. If you feel that you need a little extra depth, line the outside of the eyes too. If you've chosen a warm metallic shadow, use a rich brown liner; if you have selected a cool silver or pewter shadow, use a soft black or deep gray liner. When you're using lots of liner, keep the lips and eyes understated. Liquid liner is back, so don't be afraid to emphasize those baby blues!

The skin is pale and delicate and without a tan this season. The sunless tan is gone. You need just a shimmer of highlights on the face to give the skin a little color and healthy glow. Blush may be emphasized or kept to a minimum. Remember it's all in the accent you choose. Think pink and pretty pastels. Cool tones are the choice of the season, although they don't always work for every skin tone. Does your skin have too warm of an undertone to wear pink? Cheat it! Try mixing a little soft coral or apricot in with a sheer pink to create your own version of pink. Bronzers this season are more about the look of shimmer and highlight. The fake tan is out, and so is the sun-kissed look of the bronzer. Highlights on the skin are created with soft shimmering shades of gold, apricot, or pink.

Lips are nude and pale unless of course you have chosen lips as your accent. Lips are so nude that they could be missed -- soft shades of nude, pink, or apricot. If you're not sure of your best color, look at the inside of your lower lip to see your best tone of natural, and then go a shade lighter. Lipstick is back, glossy gloss is last year. Lipsticks should be moisturizing and have a little shine or shimmer. They should not be matte!

Getting older is getting better. Magazines and make-up companies are choosing to use older models and actresses to sell their brands. Why not when the largest, most affluent demographic is represented by women ages 39 to 52?

If you happen to fall into this category, setting trends isn't always the best way to go. You can still be stylish and pull off many of the new looks, but you must do so in the right way. Let's face it, after 35 a heavy brow line is not the way to go. But because brows frame the face, a nicely shaped brow can take years off. Try adding a little length on the underside of the brows where they start to grow and just above the arch so it appears fuller but still has a defined arch.

Be careful of the shimmers you choose; all shimmers are not created equal! Stay away from extreme frosts if the eyes are dry or beginning to show signs of aging. Instead, select a color that has a little shimmer and press on to the eyelid. Choose a matte contour shadow to give the eye the lift it needs. Keep the color slightly darker than the lid shade so it frames the eye. The highlight can have a little more shimmer but be sure and keep it right under the eyebrow. Then, line under the lower lashes with a metallic liner to pull this look together.

Blush colors should be pinks, corals, or apricot. Do not use this as your accent feature if you are following the trend. Bright cheeks can age a face and draw too much attention. Keep the cheeks soft and neutral.

Always keep skin looking moist and luminous. A little shimmer placed strategically on the face will add a soft glow to aging skin. (See illustration.)

The spring lipstick colors are nudes and pinks. They are not matte, but slightly glossy and moisturizing. Many times, older women need color on their lips so they don't look washed out. You may want to brighten the lips a little more than your younger counterpart.

Don't be afraid to choose one single feature to accent. Any age can pull this one off! You may even want to switch things up and accent different areas at different times to keep things interesting.

Promoting the New Look of Spring. For any promotion to be successful, marketing is key! The budget of the salon or spa will dictate how you should promote the new look to your clients. Check with the owner, manager, or spa director to see how you should proceed.

Get the word out. Send out an e-blast, mailer, post signs in the spa, or make phone calls. Tell your clients about the fresh new look of spring, and suggest they come in for a color consultation.

When the client arrives, spend some time talking with them discussing the spring look. You may want to prepare a questionnaire for them to complete so you have an idea of what they have in mind. Be sure and read over the questionnaire before you begin (See example of questionnaire with possible answers and what to do with the information). This will help you to create a look they will love wearing!

Put together a notebook with some of the new looks of spring. Be sure you include pictures or tear sheets of various ages and skin tones so no one is left out. Flip through the book with your client and have her show you the pictures she likes. Having the notebook available will allow her to see photos of women with similar coloring or features to her own.

Apply the make-up on the client. Explain to her each step and your reasons for selecting a color and why you chose to use it on her a specific way. Be sure and record their colors on a chart so she has something to follow once she is in front of her own make-up mirror. Review the chart with your client and the make-up application. You want her to feel confident that she can re-create her spring look. Then close the sale. Ask her what she would like to take home. This is a simple, non-threatening way to ask for the sale.

Follow up in a few days with a phone call. You want to make sure your client is not having any challenges with the application of their new look. If they are, invite them back in. Have them wear their make-up in so you can see first hand what may need correction.

Trends come and go. Take advantage of the ones that play up your best features. Go with what you feel comfortable wearing and don't get stuck in a rut. Remember, make-up is as fun as you make it!

 

Mary Van, owner and founder of Mineralogie, a leading mineral makeup company, has been a make-up artist for over 20 years. She has worked freelance, along with owning her own spa, but now concentrates solely on her cosmetic line. She attributes her success to creating products that work, and are on the cutting edge. Working with celebrities such as Jessica Simpson and LeAnn Rimes, keeps her always-creating new products as trends keep changing. For further information, go to www.mineralogie.biz.

 

 

Client Profile Sheet - Spring 2007

 

Name ___________________________________Birthday _________________

Address __________________________________________Apt ____________

City ______________________________ State __________Zip ____________

Day Phone _________________________ Evening Phone _________________

Cell Phone _________________________ Email _________________________

 

1. What do you consider your best feature(s)? ___________________________

2. How much make-up do you wear? __________________________________

3. Do you wear the latest trends in make-up? ____________________________

If so, do you apply all of the latest techniques or a few? _________________

4. What features would you like to minimize? ___________________________

5. How much time do you spend each morning on your make-up? ___________

6. How much time do you spend on make-up when you are going out or to a

special event? __________________________________________________

7. Why do you like or dislike make-up? _______________________________

8. How often do you change your make-up look? ________________________

 

 

 

Common Answers - Where to Take It from Here

 

1.What do you consider your best feature(s)?

these features will become your accent features.

 

2. How much makeup do you wear?

natural look - keep the eyes soft and understated, cheeks soft, and lips in the nude shades.

 

wear it but not a lot - a little stronger color than the "natural look". Show the client how to accent each of her best features. This client tends to wear more makeup for special occasions, show her how to enhance her makeup for these times.

 

won't leave the house without it - this client likes to have fun with their make-up and wears the latest colors and trends. Don't be shy with your application! She is going to want to learn all of the tips and tricks you can supply her with.

 

3. Do you wear the latest trends in make-up? If so, do you apply all of the latest techniques or a few?

yes - show her pictures to determine the direction to go. You will probably want to show her several options.

 

no - show her the softer side of the look of spring. Be sure and show her a mild version of accenting a feature, which knows she might want to get a little adventurous!

 

4. What features would you like to minimize?

Show her how to minimize this (these) feature(s).

 

5. How much time do you spend each morning on your makeup? 6. How much time do you spend on makeup when you are going out or to a special event?

5 - 10 minutes. This client probably prefers a minimal amount of makeup. Keep in mind the answers the have previously given. Keep the application simple; foundation, 2 eye colors, soft blush, gloss or lipstick.

 

10 - 20 minutes. This client is probably a little more of a perfectionist in her make-up application. Spend time with her to determine her best looks of spring. Apply full make-up including concealer.

 

20 - 30 minutes. Go all out, this client is going to want to see and learn it all. Apply full makeup and show her different accents for her to try. She can still look glamorous without her make-up looking "caked on".

 

7. Why do you like or dislike make-up?

do not like the way it feels on my skin - use a mineral make-up or a lightweight foundation. Keep color sheer and understated.

 

it makes me more confident - make-up evens out skin tones and helps to hide problematic skin. Make-up should be applied a little stronger on this client. They want to look like they are wearing make-up.

 

love the way it makes me look and feel - this client prefers an extreme application of make-up. Determine her best features and really play them up.

 

 

8. How often do you change your make-up look?

not often - show them a basic look and teach them how to incorporate a few of the spring tips. Be sure and tell them the spring tips so they do not carry it over into the next three to four seasons.

 

every season - you will want to put this client on your contact list for all make-up promotions. She enjoys wearing make-up and wants to know how she can look her best each season.



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By | January 16, 2019

Accentuate the positive! The hot new trend this spring is to accent one feature. It's not about not minimizing make-up but having fun with eyes, lips, or cheekbones in a playful way. Don't be shy, find that best feature and show it off!
Let's start at the top. Bangs are back. If you haven't had bangs for a while, now's the time. Short, blunt, cut bangs that rest at the top of the brows or even cover the brows are really hot this spring. If you can't wear them straight, try sweeping your bangs to the side and slightly layered.

They take a little less effort to grow back and will blend into your hair easily with a lot less commitment. The benefits of bangs are that it is much cheaper than Botox! Bangs should be soft and feathered whether you choose to wear them straight down or swept off to the side.
Next, let those brows grow back. Full, defined brows are back in style. Brush your brows up and out. Fill brows in with a brow powder in sparse areas. If you do not have brows, you'll need to draw in a soft, natural brow line with a full appearance. If your brow hair does not want to re-emerge, try dabbing a little Women's Rogaine on using a cotton swab.

Look for Shimmering Shades. If you choose to emphasize your eyes, go with metallics. Gold and silver and all shades in between are colors you'll want to have in your makeup kit. Don't wait to wear them at night; shimmer is hot for daytime wear. Choose two colors: one for the lid shade, carrying it into the crease, and another for the highlight. Be sure to line your eyes. Select the darkest shade of shimmer and wet an eyeliner brush to line your eyes. If you feel that you need a little extra depth, line the outside of the eyes too. If you've chosen a warm metallic shadow, use a rich brown liner; if you have selected a cool silver or pewter shadow, use a soft black or deep gray liner. When you're using lots of liner, keep the lips and eyes understated. Liquid liner is back, so don't be afraid to emphasize those baby blues!
The skin is pale and delicate and without a tan this season. The sunless tan is gone. You need just a shimmer of highlights on the face to give the skin a little color and healthy glow. Blush may be emphasized or kept to a minimum. Remember it's all in the accent you choose. Think pink and pretty pastels. Cool tones are the choice of the season, although they don't always work for every skin tone. Does your skin have too warm of an undertone to wear pink? Cheat it! Try mixing a little soft coral or apricot in with a sheer pink to create your own version of pink. Bronzers this season are more about the look of shimmer and highlight. The fake tan is out, and so is the sun-kissed look of the bronzer. Highlights on the skin are created with soft shimmering shades of gold, apricot, or pink.
Lips are nude and pale unless of course you have chosen lips as your accent. Lips are so nude that they could be missed -- soft shades of nude, pink, or apricot. If you're not sure of your best color, look at the inside of your lower lip to see your best tone of natural, and then go a shade lighter. Lipstick is back, glossy gloss is last year. Lipsticks should be moisturizing and have a little shine or shimmer. They should not be matte!

Getting older is getting better. Magazines and make-up companies are choosing to use older models and actresses to sell their brands. Why not when the largest, most affluent demographic is represented by women ages 39 to 52?
If you happen to fall into this category, setting trends isn't always the best way to go. You can still be stylish and pull off many of the new looks, but you must do so in the right way. Let's face it, after 35 a heavy brow line is not the way to go. But because brows frame the face, a nicely shaped brow can take years off. Try adding a little length on the underside of the brows where they start to grow and just above the arch so it appears fuller but still has a defined arch.
Be careful of the shimmers you choose; all shimmers are not created equal! Stay away from extreme frosts if the eyes are dry or beginning to show signs of aging. Instead, select a color that has a little shimmer and press on to the eyelid. Choose a matte contour shadow to give the eye the lift it needs. Keep the color slightly darker than the lid shade so it frames the eye. The highlight can have a little more shimmer but be sure and keep it right under the eyebrow. Then, line under the lower lashes with a metallic liner to pull this look together.
Blush colors should be pinks, corals, or apricot. Do not use this as your accent feature if you are following the trend. Bright cheeks can age a face and draw too much attention. Keep the cheeks soft and neutral.
Always keep skin looking moist and luminous. A little shimmer placed strategically on the face will add a soft glow to aging skin.
The spring lipstick colors are nudes and pinks. They are not matte, but slightly glossy and moisturizing. Many times, older women need color on their lips so they don't look washed out. You may want to brighten the lips a little more than your younger counterpart.
Don't be afraid to choose one single feature to accent. Any age can pull this one off! You may even want to switch things up and accent different areas at different times to keep things interesting.

Promoting the New Look of Spring. For any promotion to be successful, marketing is key! The budget of the salon or spa will dictate how you should promote the new look to your clients. Check with the owner, manager, or spa director to see how you should proceed.
Get the word out. Send out an e-blast, mailer, post signs in the spa, or make phone calls. Tell your clients about the fresh new look of spring, and suggest they come in for a color consultation.
When the client arrives, spend some time talking with them discussing the spring look. You may want to prepare a questionnaire for them to complete so you have an idea of what they have in mind. Be sure and read over the questionnaire before you begin (See example of questionnaire with possible answers and what to do with the information). This will help you to create a look they will love wearing!
Put together a notebook with some of the new looks of spring. Be sure you include pictures or tear sheets of various ages and skin tones so no one is left out. Flip through the book with your client and have her show you the pictures she likes. Having the notebook available will allow her to see photos of women with similar coloring or features to her own.
Apply the make-up on the client. Explain to her each step and your reasons for selecting a color and why you chose to use it on her a specific way. Be sure and record their colors on a chart so she has something to follow once she is in front of her own make-up mirror. Review the chart with your client and the make-up application. You want her to feel confident that she can re-create her spring look. Then close the sale. Ask her what she would like to take home. This is a simple, non-threatening way to ask for the sale.
Follow up in a few days with a phone call. You want to make sure your client is not having any challenges with the application of their new look. If they are, invite them back in. Have them wear their make-up in so you can see first hand what may need correction.

Trends come and go. Take advantage of the ones that play up your best features. Go with what you feel comfortable wearing and don't get stuck in a rut. Remember, make-up is as fun as you make it!

 

Client Profile Sheet - Spring 2007

Name ___________________________________Birthday _________________

Address __________________________________________Apt ____________

City ______________________________ State __________Zip ____________

Day Phone _________________________ Evening Phone _________________

Cell Phone _________________________ Email _________________________

 

1. What do you consider your best feature(s)? ___________________________

2. How much make-up do you wear? __________________________________

3. Do you wear the latest trends in make-up? ____________________________

If so, do you apply all of the latest techniques or a few? ____________________

4. What features would you like to minimize? ___________________________

5. How much time do you spend each morning on your make-up? ____________

6. How much time do you spend on make-up when you are going out or to a

special event? __________________________________________________

7. Why do you like or dislike make-up? _______________________________

8. How often do you change your make-up look? ________________________

 

Common Answers - Where to Take It from Here

1.What do you consider your best feature(s)?
these features will become your accent features.

2. How much makeup do you wear?
natural look - keep the eyes soft and understated, cheeks soft, and lips in the nude shades.
wear it but not a lot - a little stronger color than the "natural look". Show the client how to accent each of her best features. This client tends to wear more makeup for special occasions, show her how to enhance her makeup for these times.
won't leave the house without it - this client likes to have fun with their make-up and wears the latest colors and trends. Don't be shy with your application! She is going to want to learn all of the tips and tricks you can supply her with.

3. Do you wear the latest trends in make-up? If so, do you apply all of the latest techniques or a few?
yes - show her pictures to determine the direction to go. You will probably want to show her several options.
no - show her the softer side of the look of spring. Be sure and show her a mild version of accenting a feature, which knows she might want to get a little adventurous!

4. What features would you like to minimize?
Show her how to minimize this (these) feature(s).

5. How much time do you spend each morning on your makeup? 6. How much time do you spend on makeup when you are going out or to a special event?
5 - 10 minutes. This client probably prefers a minimal amount of makeup. Keep in mind the answers the have previously given. Keep the application simple; foundation, 2 eye colors, soft blush, gloss or lipstick.
10 - 20 minutes. This client is probably a little more of a perfectionist in her make-up application. Spend time with her to determine her best looks of spring. Apply full make-up including concealer.
20 - 30 minutes. Go all out, this client is going to want to see and learn it all. Apply full makeup and show her different accents for her to try. She can still look glamorous without her make-up looking "caked on".

7. Why do you like or dislike make-up?
do not like the way it feels on my skin - use a mineral make-up or a lightweight foundation. Keep color sheer and understated.
it makes me more confident - make-up evens out skin tones and helps to hide problematic skin. Make-up should be applied a little stronger on this client. They want to look like they are wearing make-up.
love the way it makes me look and feel - this client prefers an extreme application of make-up. Determine her best features and really play them up.

8. How often do you change your make-up look?
not often - show them a basic look and teach them how to incorporate a few of the spring tips. Be sure and tell them the spring tips so they do not carry it over into the next three to four seasons.
every season - you will want to put this client on your contact list for all make-up promotions. She enjoys wearing make-up and wants to know how she can look her best each season.

Mary Van, owner and founder of Mineralogie, a leading mineral makeup company, has been a make-up artist for over 20 years. She has worked freelance, along with owning her own spa, but now concentrates solely on her cosmetic line. She attributes her success to creating products that work, and are on the cutting edge. Working with celebrities such as Jessica Simpson and LeAnn Rimes, keeps her always-creating new products as trends keep changing. For further information, go to www.mineralogie.biz.



Read More
By | January 16, 2019

Theory of Corporate and Business Planning, Conflict Resolution, Human Resource Managers, verbal and written reprimands and warnings, OSHA, ADA, and ACLU are all important topics when it comes to owning a business. After pondering these topics for oh… 15 seconds, I came to realize that the main reason we became business owners is because we love the industry and are passionate about our work. The employees that we surround ourselves with at our place of business, although with many differences, are all practicing the same end philosophy, 100 percent customer care that is physical, social, and therapeutic.
As an aesthetician (18 years) and a skin clinic owner (over 15 years), I wish to share some of my experiences to assist in your business employee relations. I believe everyone is brought into our lives for a reason. Some individuals stay for a very long time and become lasting relationships; others come and go quickly. Half of my current staff has been employed with me from the day we opened our doors. We have all been through a lot together: marriages, kids, success, growth, and even death. I can honestly say most of the people that have crossed over my tracks have taught me very valuable lessons in life: how I want to be treated, how I should treat people, what type of person I need to invest in, and what type of person I need to avoid.

Hiring
Whether you are the applicant, manager, or owner, when going into an interview, have not only your questions prepared, but more importantly, be prepared with answers. Some of these should be full disclosure of the position, a mock schedule, job duties, and even the compensation (this can be a sticky subject to discuss, but should be disclosed). Be prepared to list other duties related to the position such as daily cleaning, laundry, or team playing. Being open about the position will give you insight to the types of expectations that each side has, leaving no room for surprises, and indirectly answering many questions. While you are interviewing, do not only think of the short term, but plan for the long term. While you are questioning your prospect, try to objectively judge them as an individual and decide how they will fit with the current employees you have. Will they “rock the boat” and generate some drama throughout the facility, or will this person “play well with others”, follow rules and guidelines, and set a good example? Ask them about their previous employment: how or why did they leave, how did they feel about their previous co-workers and supervisor?
So when you think you are ready to hire them, STOP. Let them know you will contact them. When you ‘settle’ for an applicant as an employee simply because you need a position filled, the situation will almost always turn bad. Schedule a lunch, spend more than 30 minutes with them, and get a little more insight on them, their values, and personality. By inviting people to lunch, the interview is more casual and your potential hire is more comfortable, and shows more of his/her personality. From my experience, we’ve been surprised many times by individuals that have been good candidates at an interview but have had bad character at lunch.

Realistic Expectations
Having good relations means having a special bond with each and every person that works with you. This includes knowing their strengths, weakness, values, and goals. Helping people attain their goals and working to improve their knowledge will help them grow and keep them focused. Working in an environment that does not stimulate learning and creativity becomes dull and mundane. Turn education and creativity into a personal goal of your own by basing your success on your employee’s success. Do not hold back valuable lessons and techniques in order to make yourself feel like a superior technician or aesthetician. Educate, encourage, and push your staff to grow and excel in their practice. The successful ones will stay and grow and the lazy, unmotivated will leave.
Know your staff’s limitations. Scheduling, sales, and services are all part of our daily grind. Work with your employee schedule and attempt to accommodate requests. For example, some employees are comfortable with a part-time schedule. Do not open their books to accommodate more clientele unless it is discussed with the employee. Although we are in the service industry and always wish to get the clients on the books in a timely fashion, make these schedule changes the exception – not the rule. Changes in something as simple as a work schedule can become an issue to the employee that may have him/her seeking another place of employment. Some employees do not like to sell products to their clientele. Show them the art of the subtle sell or otherwise suggestive selling. When it comes to services, some are more aggressive, fast, or detailed. Employees who prefer to take 30 minutes to perform a brow wax, or are uncomfortable in performing bikini or brazilian waxing are not necessarily lazy, but need more practice, confidence, and/or instruction on their technique. Should you tell someone that you will only schedule five minutes to perform a service that they need 30 minutes to perform, they will probably perform that service poorly. As a business owner or manager it is your responsibility to find the balance with each of them while realizing that you may be able to mold them a little, but will not change their persona.

Artists in Aesthetician’s Clothing
Our industry is composed of creative people, artists in some cases. I feel we chose this field because people are our canvas and our goal is to create beautiful skin, bodies, hair, and even make-up. The services we provide make people feel good about their appearance and help improve their self-esteem. Many individuals, partners, or groups of people open a facility with the big corporate company idea or environment that they are accustomed to. Don’t forget that many of us have left, or are unhappy in the corporate setting due to the lack of freedom, or the passion of making people feel good about themselves. Change things up and add fun elements to your work environment. Employees feel valued and appreciated when they have the pleasure of voicing their opinion. Some of these fun elements can be as simple as adding their own personal décor in their treatment room or workspace. Even taking polls or voting on issues that address uniforms or proper dress attire and selling their favorite skin care line. Essentially this concept goes back to what was said earlier: treat people the way you would like to be treated. Respect their opinions, consideration, and a degree of self expression cannot be annihilated completely, as we are all human. It is our personality and our compassion that creates lasting impressions and relationships with our clients.

Managing the Frontlines
There comes a time when the decision comes to either run a business yourself as an owner and manager, or be the owner and hire a manager. If you choose to hire a manager, building a relationship with this person is of the utmost importance. A manager can either become your right hand or your worst enemy. Valuable characteristics in a facility manager include great team building skills, reflects the best interests of the company, and, most important, the fashion in which they treat the clients. Communication is key to any position, especially when your manager is reliable for maintaining communication to the staff, clients, and the owner.
Managers must also be reliable enough to handle sticky situations. These can include client-employee complaints and employee-employee complaints. A prime example of an employee-employee complaint manages to arise around birthdays. A solution that our manager has created and practiced is a monthly potluck. For those who are celebrating birthdays, the company buys the card and the cake and everyone signs the card and eats the goodies that were brought in for the luncheon. Gift exchanges can only be done after hours to avoid catty comments like, “she bought Suzy a gift and didn’t buy one for me” or “she didn’t spend that much money on my gift”. Potluck luncheons with company gifts have eliminated these spats in the workplace. In addition to celebrating birthdays, potluck luncheons are a great way to open monthly communications with your staff; business and pleasure combined.
Managers and owners need to maintain open communication and be understanding of each other. A good manager takes pride in the facility they’re running, give them the respect and freedom to show their talents. One of my personal weaknesses is that I tend to be overbearing on my managers and had a history of running them off. Several years later, I learned that a healthy respectful relationship with your manager will maintain a smooth running business. However, although you have great trust and respect, maintain an open door policy. If an employee-employee complaint arises, listen to each employee separately to understand each complaint. Next, bring them together and mediate the conversation. Through this, everyone is on the same page and problems truly get resolved without the unnecessary gossip and idle chat. Does this work when dealing with an all women facility? Yes. The same protocol holds true when you are reprimanding or firing a staff member. Your manager should always be present so you are both on the same page, but never give your manger the authority to fire an employee as that power should be reserved to the owner.

Slow Business Can Yield Great Production
If business is slow, put your staff to work. This can include simple phone calls and letters to clients, cleaning and chores, or education. Have a ‘product of the month’ sale that includes a quick meeting with your staff to go over the selling points of the item and how it works, then role-play sales pitches to each other. If business is slow or just starting out, create events with your staff and make it a team-building event, not a stressful situation. As a business owner, it is important to remember that your mood radiates through your business. Like a common cold, stress and anxiety can radiate from you, to your manager and to the staff. In turn, when the staff is unhappy, it’s hard to keep up a positive image to your clients. Keep your employees upbeat and busy. Again, this concept goes back to retaining valuable employees. A stressful work environment is a significant factor that will get your employee looking for a new job. The longer you can keep an employee, the more stable your business becomes. High turnover in our industry causes a loss in clientele and thus a loss in income. Maintain a positive work environment no matter what the situation, keep your staff busy (we all know there’s something to do) and make your facility successful.
When the day is done I’d like you to sit and think about your experiences as a receptionist, aesthetician, manager, or owner. Step back and think about some of your past coworkers/employees and what they gave you. What did you learn and how have they developed you? What events in your day have you learned from? This can include a suggestion or comment made by a fellow employee or one of your clients. We all learn from praise and scorn, but the key is take it all in and make your future judgments based off of these events. Practice a mindful mantra in your facility. Is your crew working together to make a successful practice? Without effective leadership and communication you have a slowly sinking ship. Remember that your employee’s are human, they make mistakes and they have personalities of their own. Keep a keen eye out when hiring and mold them for success, those who are not interested in learning will leave. The road to harmony, peace, love, happiness, and success is… well, what you make of it.

Tina Zillmann is a paramedical aesthetician, having a focus in acne care and light-peeling treatments. She is also the owner of the Skin Rejuvenation Clinique, Inc., a facility that services to pre- and post-operative patients. Zillmann also acts as a national educator for Advanced Rejuvenating Concepts™. Recently, she was the recipient of the Entrepreneur Spirit Award from the National Association of Women Business Owners.



Read More
By | January 16, 2019

Theory of Corporate and Business Planning, Conflict Resolution, Human Resource Managers, verbal and written reprimands and warnings, OSHA, ADA, and ACLU are all important topics when it comes to owning a business. After pondering these topics for oh… 15 seconds, I came to realize that the main reason we became business owners is because we love the industry and are passionate about our work. The employees that we surround ourselves with at our place of business, although with many differences, are all practicing the same end philosophy, 100 percent customer care that is physical, social, and therapeutic.

As an aesthetician (18 years) and a skin clinic owner (over 15 years), I wish to share some of my experiences to assist in your business employee relations. I believe everyone is brought into our lives for a reason. Some individuals stay for a very long time and become lasting relationships; others come and go quickly. Half of my current staff has been employed with me from the day we opened our doors. We have all been through a lot together: marriages, kids, success, growth, and even death. I can honestly say most of the people that have crossed over my tracks have taught me very valuable lessons in life: how I want to be treated, how I should treat people, what type of person I need to invest in, and what type of person I need to avoid.

Hiring
Whether you are the applicant, manager, or owner, when going into an interview, have not only your questions prepared, but more importantly, be prepared with answers. Some of these should be full disclosure of the position, a mock schedule, job duties, and even the compensation (this can be a sticky subject to discuss, but should be disclosed). Be prepared to list other duties related to the position such as daily cleaning, laundry, or team playing. Being open about the position will give you insight to the types of expectations that each side has, leaving no room for surprises, and indirectly answering many questions. While you are interviewing, do not only think of the short term, but plan for the long term. While you are questioning your prospect, try to objectively judge them as an individual and decide how they will fit with the current employees you have. Will they “rock the boat” and generate some drama throughout the facility, or will this person “play well with others”, follow rules and guidelines, and set a good example? Ask them about their previous employment: how or why did they leave, how did they feel about their previous co-workers and supervisor?
So when you think you are ready to hire them, STOP. Let them know you will contact them. When you ‘settle’ for an applicant as an employee simply because you need a position filled, the situation will almost always turn bad. Schedule a lunch, spend more than 30 minutes with them, and get a little more insight on them, their values, and personality. By inviting people to lunch, the interview is more casual and your potential hire is more comfortable, and shows more of his/her personality. From my experience, we’ve been surprised many times by individuals that have been good candidates at an interview but have had bad character at lunch.

Realistic Expectations
Having good relations means having a special bond with each and every person that works with you. This includes knowing their strengths, weakness, values, and goals. Helping people attain their goals and working to improve their knowledge will help them grow and keep them focused. Working in an environment that does not stimulate learning and creativity becomes dull and mundane. Turn education and creativity into a personal goal of your own by basing your success on your employee’s success. Do not hold back valuable lessons and techniques in order to make yourself feel like a superior technician or aesthetician. Educate, encourage, and push your staff to grow and excel in their practice. The successful ones will stay and grow and the lazy, unmotivated will leave.
Know your staff’s limitations. Scheduling, sales, and services are all part of our daily grind. Work with your employee schedule and attempt to accommodate requests. For example, some employees are comfortable with a part-time schedule. Do not open their books to accommodate more clientele unless it is discussed with the employee. Although we are in the service industry and always wish to get the clients on the books in a timely fashion, make these schedule changes the exception – not the rule. Changes in something as simple as a work schedule can become an issue to the employee that may have him/her seeking another place of employment. Some employees do not like to sell products to their clientele. Show them the art of the subtle sell or otherwise suggestive selling. When it comes to services, some are more aggressive, fast, or detailed. Employees who prefer to take 30 minutes to perform a brow wax, or are uncomfortable in performing bikini or brazilian waxing are not necessarily lazy, but need more practice, confidence, and/or instruction on their technique. Should you tell someone that you will only schedule five minutes to perform a service that they need 30 minutes to perform, they will probably perform that service poorly. As a business owner or manager it is your responsibility to find the balance with each of them while realizing that you may be able to mold them a little, but will not change their persona.

Artists in Aesthetician’s Clothing
Our industry is composed of creative people, artists in some cases. I feel we chose this field because people are our canvas and our goal is to create beautiful skin, bodies, hair, and even make-up. The services we provide make people feel good about their appearance and help improve their self-esteem. Many individuals, partners, or groups of people open a facility with the big corporate company idea or environment that they are accustomed to. Don’t forget that many of us have left, or are unhappy in the corporate setting due to the lack of freedom, or the passion of making people feel good about themselves. Change things up and add fun elements to your work environment. Employees feel valued and appreciated when they have the pleasure of voicing their opinion. Some of these fun elements can be as simple as adding their own personal décor in their treatment room or workspace. Even taking polls or voting on issues that address uniforms or proper dress attire and selling their favorite skin care line. Essentially this concept goes back to what was said earlier: treat people the way you would like to be treated. Respect their opinions, consideration, and a degree of self expression cannot be annihilated completely, as we are all human. It is our personality and our compassion that creates lasting impressions and relationships with our clients.

Managing the Frontlines
There comes a time when the decision comes to either run a business yourself as an owner and manager, or be the owner and hire a manager. If you choose to hire a manager, building a relationship with this person is of the utmost importance. A manager can either become your right hand or your worst enemy. Valuable characteristics in a facility manager include great team building skills, reflects the best interests of the company, and, most important, the fashion in which they treat the clients. Communication is key to any position, especially when your manager is reliable for maintaining communication to the staff, clients, and the owner.
Managers must also be reliable enough to handle sticky situations. These can include client-employee complaints and employee-employee complaints. A prime example of an employee-employee complaint manages to arise around birthdays. A solution that our manager has created and practiced is a monthly potluck. For those who are celebrating birthdays, the company buys the card and the cake and everyone signs the card and eats the goodies that were brought in for the luncheon. Gift exchanges can only be done after hours to avoid catty comments like, “she bought Suzy a gift and didn’t buy one for me” or “she didn’t spend that much money on my gift”. Potluck luncheons with company gifts have eliminated these spats in the workplace. In addition to celebrating birthdays, potluck luncheons are a great way to open monthly communications with your staff; business and pleasure combined.
Managers and owners need to maintain open communication and be understanding of each other. A good manager takes pride in the facility they’re running, give them the respect and freedom to show their talents. One of my personal weaknesses is that I tend to be overbearing on my managers and had a history of running them off. Several years later, I learned that a healthy respectful relationship with your manager will maintain a smooth running business. However, although you have great trust and respect, maintain an open door policy. If an employee-employee complaint arises, listen to each employee separately to understand each complaint. Next, bring them together and mediate the conversation. Through this, everyone is on the same page and problems truly get resolved without the unnecessary gossip and idle chat. Does this work when dealing with an all women facility? Yes. The same protocol holds true when you are reprimanding or firing a staff member. Your manager should always be present so you are both on the same page, but never give your manger the authority to fire an employee as that power should be reserved to the owner.

Slow Business Can Yield Great Production
If business is slow, put your staff to work. This can include simple phone calls and letters to clients, cleaning and chores, or education. Have a ‘product of the month’ sale that includes a quick meeting with your staff to go over the selling points of the item and how it works, then role-play sales pitches to each other. If business is slow or just starting out, create events with your staff and make it a team-building event, not a stressful situation. As a business owner, it is important to remember that your mood radiates through your business. Like a common cold, stress and anxiety can radiate from you, to your manager and to the staff. In turn, when the staff is unhappy, it’s hard to keep up a positive image to your clients. Keep your employees upbeat and busy. Again, this concept goes back to retaining valuable employees. A stressful work environment is a significant factor that will get your employee looking for a new job. The longer you can keep an employee, the more stable your business becomes. High turnover in our industry causes a loss in clientele and thus a loss in income. Maintain a positive work environment no matter what the situation, keep your staff busy (we all know there’s something to do) and make your facility successful.
When the day is done I’d like you to sit and think about your experiences as a receptionist, aesthetician, manager, or owner. Step back and think about some of your past coworkers/employees and what they gave you. What did you learn and how have they developed you? What events in your day have you learned from? This can include a suggestion or comment made by a fellow employee or one of your clients. We all learn from praise and scorn, but the key is take it all in and make your future judgments based off of these events. Practice a mindful mantra in your facility. Is your crew working together to make a successful practice? Without effective leadership and communication you have a slowly sinking ship. Remember that your employee’s are human, they make mistakes and they have personalities of their own. Keep a keen eye out when hiring and mold them for success, those who are not interested in learning will leave. The road to harmony, peace, love, happiness, and success is… well, what you make of it.

Tina Zillmann is a paramedical aesthetician, having a focus in acne care and light-peeling treatments. She is also the owner of the Skin Rejuvenation Clinique, Inc., a facility that services to pre- and post-operative patients. Zillmann also acts as a national educator for Advanced Rejuvenating Concepts™. Recently, she was the recipient of the Entrepreneur Spirit Award from the National Association of Women Business Owners.

 

 



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