Search
  Advanced Search
Results Total: 391 results found.
Refine your search by section:  Community (17)  Articles (369)  Company Listings (5)
 Display
By | January 21, 2019

An employer often wants to hire someone that is an asset to their organization, someone that they can trust and will stay with them for the long-run. However, things are not like they used to be. Back in the day, an employee would be hired and could often be counted on to stay in their current job until retirement. Today, there are endless opportunities and people want to chase them. Turnover is often high, especially in the skin care industry.

 

Aestheticians are artists and dreamers by nature – healers who want to heal the world and make it beautiful. Some are impatient, always on the lookout for something better. They may go into a job with the best of intentions, getting used to things, getting along with their employer, and feeling blessed that they have the opportunity to work in that job. Eventually, however, they may become antsy, thinking that if they found this job and it is this good, then, maybe there is something better out there. After deciding to take a chance and start applying for jobs, they may get an offer with more money, better hours, or a closer commute. However, after the position starts, they may find the grass is not greener on the other side. Perhaps other employees are not acting right or the boss is not what they made themselves out to be.

 

For one reason or another, at some point in their career, a skin care professional may find themselves contemplating whether or not to return to a former place of employment. Situations that involve reconnecting with a former employer can be tricky. The key is to assess each individual situation.

 

For instance, in some cases, a former employer may reach out to a professional, asking them to consider coming back. In this case, the former employee should reflect back on what employment with this employer was like in the past. Was there ever a feeling of being stagnant, with no opportunity for growth? Was the employee repeatedly passed over for a promotion? Consider why the decision was made to leave and seek better opportunities in the first place. And what will things look like upon return? If the former employer did not treat the professional with respect and fairness in the past, who is to say new promises will be fulfilled this time around? Sometimes in this industry, it is hard to make it and bad employers will take advantage of employees, even if they are good and hard-working. It may seem tempting to return to a familiar position, even despite poor working conditions, because of fear of changes and uncertainty in how things will pan out if new horizons are pursued. Still, in situations like this, it is often best to take a leap of faith and move on. It is probably not in the former employee’s best interest to go back.

 

On the flip side, in some cases, a former employer and employee could have parted ways amicably, with trust intact. There could be a time somewhere in the future where they may find themselves wanting to work together again. If this is the case, joining forces again may be appropriate. After all, it can be hard to make solid and reliable connections in the industry, so when they are found, sticking with them is a great idea. Even if currently working solo or freelance, it is always good to have an ally in the industry, as situations can change in the future.

 

Whatever the situation, when considering returning to work for a former employee, evaluating past experiences and going with what feels best is most important in making healthy employment decisions.



Read More
By | January 21, 2019

Theory of Corporate and Business Planning, Conflict Resolution, Human Resource Managers, verbal and written reprimands and warnings, OSHA, ADA, and ACLU are all important topics when it comes to owning a business. After pondering these topics for oh… 15 seconds, I came to realize that the main reason we became business owners is because we love the industry and are passionate about our work. The employees that we surround ourselves with at our place of business, although with many differences, are all practicing the same end philosophy, 100 percent customer care that is physical, social, and therapeutic.
As an aesthetician (18 years) and a skin clinic owner (over 15 years), I wish to share some of my experiences to assist in your business employee relations. I believe everyone is brought into our lives for a reason. Some individuals stay for a very long time and become lasting relationships; others come and go quickly. Half of my current staff has been employed with me from the day we opened our doors. We have all been through a lot together: marriages, kids, success, growth, and even death. I can honestly say most of the people that have crossed over my tracks have taught me very valuable lessons in life: how I want to be treated, how I should treat people, what type of person I need to invest in, and what type of person I need to avoid.

Hiring
Whether you are the applicant, manager, or owner, when going into an interview, have not only your questions prepared, but more importantly, be prepared with answers. Some of these should be full disclosure of the position, a mock schedule, job duties, and even the compensation (this can be a sticky subject to discuss, but should be disclosed). Be prepared to list other duties related to the position such as daily cleaning, laundry, or team playing. Being open about the position will give you insight to the types of expectations that each side has, leaving no room for surprises, and indirectly answering many questions. While you are interviewing, do not only think of the short term, but plan for the long term. While you are questioning your prospect, try to objectively judge them as an individual and decide how they will fit with the current employees you have. Will they “rock the boat” and generate some drama throughout the facility, or will this person “play well with others”, follow rules and guidelines, and set a good example? Ask them about their previous employment: how or why did they leave, how did they feel about their previous co-workers and supervisor?
So when you think you are ready to hire them, STOP. Let them know you will contact them. When you ‘settle’ for an applicant as an employee simply because you need a position filled, the situation will almost always turn bad. Schedule a lunch, spend more than 30 minutes with them, and get a little more insight on them, their values, and personality. By inviting people to lunch, the interview is more casual and your potential hire is more comfortable, and shows more of his/her personality. From my experience, we’ve been surprised many times by individuals that have been good candidates at an interview but have had bad character at lunch.

Realistic Expectations
Having good relations means having a special bond with each and every person that works with you. This includes knowing their strengths, weakness, values, and goals. Helping people attain their goals and working to improve their knowledge will help them grow and keep them focused. Working in an environment that does not stimulate learning and creativity becomes dull and mundane. Turn education and creativity into a personal goal of your own by basing your success on your employee’s success. Do not hold back valuable lessons and techniques in order to make yourself feel like a superior technician or aesthetician. Educate, encourage, and push your staff to grow and excel in their practice. The successful ones will stay and grow and the lazy, unmotivated will leave.
Know your staff’s limitations. Scheduling, sales, and services are all part of our daily grind. Work with your employee schedule and attempt to accommodate requests. For example, some employees are comfortable with a part-time schedule. Do not open their books to accommodate more clientele unless it is discussed with the employee. Although we are in the service industry and always wish to get the clients on the books in a timely fashion, make these schedule changes the exception – not the rule. Changes in something as simple as a work schedule can become an issue to the employee that may have him/her seeking another place of employment. Some employees do not like to sell products to their clientele. Show them the art of the subtle sell or otherwise suggestive selling. When it comes to services, some are more aggressive, fast, or detailed. Employees who prefer to take 30 minutes to perform a brow wax, or are uncomfortable in performing bikini or brazilian waxing are not necessarily lazy, but need more practice, confidence, and/or instruction on their technique. Should you tell someone that you will only schedule five minutes to perform a service that they need 30 minutes to perform, they will probably perform that service poorly. As a business owner or manager it is your responsibility to find the balance with each of them while realizing that you may be able to mold them a little, but will not change their persona.

Artists in Aesthetician’s Clothing
Our industry is composed of creative people, artists in some cases. I feel we chose this field because people are our canvas and our goal is to create beautiful skin, bodies, hair, and even make-up. The services we provide make people feel good about their appearance and help improve their self-esteem. Many individuals, partners, or groups of people open a facility with the big corporate company idea or environment that they are accustomed to. Don’t forget that many of us have left, or are unhappy in the corporate setting due to the lack of freedom, or the passion of making people feel good about themselves. Change things up and add fun elements to your work environment. Employees feel valued and appreciated when they have the pleasure of voicing their opinion. Some of these fun elements can be as simple as adding their own personal décor in their treatment room or workspace. Even taking polls or voting on issues that address uniforms or proper dress attire and selling their favorite skin care line. Essentially this concept goes back to what was said earlier: treat people the way you would like to be treated. Respect their opinions, consideration, and a degree of self expression cannot be annihilated completely, as we are all human. It is our personality and our compassion that creates lasting impressions and relationships with our clients.

Managing the Frontlines
There comes a time when the decision comes to either run a business yourself as an owner and manager, or be the owner and hire a manager. If you choose to hire a manager, building a relationship with this person is of the utmost importance. A manager can either become your right hand or your worst enemy. Valuable characteristics in a facility manager include great team building skills, reflects the best interests of the company, and, most important, the fashion in which they treat the clients. Communication is key to any position, especially when your manager is reliable for maintaining communication to the staff, clients, and the owner.
Managers must also be reliable enough to handle sticky situations. These can include client-employee complaints and employee-employee complaints. A prime example of an employee-employee complaint manages to arise around birthdays. A solution that our manager has created and practiced is a monthly potluck. For those who are celebrating birthdays, the company buys the card and the cake and everyone signs the card and eats the goodies that were brought in for the luncheon. Gift exchanges can only be done after hours to avoid catty comments like, “she bought Suzy a gift and didn’t buy one for me” or “she didn’t spend that much money on my gift”. Potluck luncheons with company gifts have eliminated these spats in the workplace. In addition to celebrating birthdays, potluck luncheons are a great way to open monthly communications with your staff; business and pleasure combined.
Managers and owners need to maintain open communication and be understanding of each other. A good manager takes pride in the facility they’re running, give them the respect and freedom to show their talents. One of my personal weaknesses is that I tend to be overbearing on my managers and had a history of running them off. Several years later, I learned that a healthy respectful relationship with your manager will maintain a smooth running business. However, although you have great trust and respect, maintain an open door policy. If an employee-employee complaint arises, listen to each employee separately to understand each complaint. Next, bring them together and mediate the conversation. Through this, everyone is on the same page and problems truly get resolved without the unnecessary gossip and idle chat. Does this work when dealing with an all women facility? Yes. The same protocol holds true when you are reprimanding or firing a staff member. Your manager should always be present so you are both on the same page, but never give your manger the authority to fire an employee as that power should be reserved to the owner.

Slow Business Can Yield Great Production
If business is slow, put your staff to work. This can include simple phone calls and letters to clients, cleaning and chores, or education. Have a ‘product of the month’ sale that includes a quick meeting with your staff to go over the selling points of the item and how it works, then role-play sales pitches to each other. If business is slow or just starting out, create events with your staff and make it a team-building event, not a stressful situation. As a business owner, it is important to remember that your mood radiates through your business. Like a common cold, stress and anxiety can radiate from you, to your manager and to the staff. In turn, when the staff is unhappy, it’s hard to keep up a positive image to your clients. Keep your employees upbeat and busy. Again, this concept goes back to retaining valuable employees. A stressful work environment is a significant factor that will get your employee looking for a new job. The longer you can keep an employee, the more stable your business becomes. High turnover in our industry causes a loss in clientele and thus a loss in income. Maintain a positive work environment no matter what the situation, keep your staff busy (we all know there’s something to do) and make your facility successful.
When the day is done I’d like you to sit and think about your experiences as a receptionist, aesthetician, manager, or owner. Step back and think about some of your past coworkers/employees and what they gave you. What did you learn and how have they developed you? What events in your day have you learned from? This can include a suggestion or comment made by a fellow employee or one of your clients. We all learn from praise and scorn, but the key is take it all in and make your future judgments based off of these events. Practice a mindful mantra in your facility. Is your crew working together to make a successful practice? Without effective leadership and communication you have a slowly sinking ship. Remember that your employee’s are human, they make mistakes and they have personalities of their own. Keep a keen eye out when hiring and mold them for success, those who are not interested in learning will leave. The road to harmony, peace, love, happiness, and success is… well, what you make of it.

Tina Zillmann is a paramedical aesthetician, having a focus in acne care and light-peeling treatments. She is also the owner of the Skin Rejuvenation Clinique, Inc., a facility that services to pre- and post-operative patients. Zillmann also acts as a national educator for Advanced Rejuvenating Concepts™. Recently, she was the recipient of the Entrepreneur Spirit Award from the National Association of Women Business Owners.



Read More
By | January 21, 2019

Theory of Corporate and Business Planning, Conflict Resolution, Human Resource Managers, verbal and written reprimands and warnings, OSHA, ADA, and ACLU are all important topics when it comes to owning a business. After pondering these topics for oh… 15 seconds, I came to realize that the main reason we became business owners is because we love the industry and are passionate about our work. The employees that we surround ourselves with at our place of business, although with many differences, are all practicing the same end philosophy, 100 percent customer care that is physical, social, and therapeutic.

As an aesthetician (18 years) and a skin clinic owner (over 15 years), I wish to share some of my experiences to assist in your business employee relations. I believe everyone is brought into our lives for a reason. Some individuals stay for a very long time and become lasting relationships; others come and go quickly. Half of my current staff has been employed with me from the day we opened our doors. We have all been through a lot together: marriages, kids, success, growth, and even death. I can honestly say most of the people that have crossed over my tracks have taught me very valuable lessons in life: how I want to be treated, how I should treat people, what type of person I need to invest in, and what type of person I need to avoid.

Hiring
Whether you are the applicant, manager, or owner, when going into an interview, have not only your questions prepared, but more importantly, be prepared with answers. Some of these should be full disclosure of the position, a mock schedule, job duties, and even the compensation (this can be a sticky subject to discuss, but should be disclosed). Be prepared to list other duties related to the position such as daily cleaning, laundry, or team playing. Being open about the position will give you insight to the types of expectations that each side has, leaving no room for surprises, and indirectly answering many questions. While you are interviewing, do not only think of the short term, but plan for the long term. While you are questioning your prospect, try to objectively judge them as an individual and decide how they will fit with the current employees you have. Will they “rock the boat” and generate some drama throughout the facility, or will this person “play well with others”, follow rules and guidelines, and set a good example? Ask them about their previous employment: how or why did they leave, how did they feel about their previous co-workers and supervisor?
So when you think you are ready to hire them, STOP. Let them know you will contact them. When you ‘settle’ for an applicant as an employee simply because you need a position filled, the situation will almost always turn bad. Schedule a lunch, spend more than 30 minutes with them, and get a little more insight on them, their values, and personality. By inviting people to lunch, the interview is more casual and your potential hire is more comfortable, and shows more of his/her personality. From my experience, we’ve been surprised many times by individuals that have been good candidates at an interview but have had bad character at lunch.

Realistic Expectations
Having good relations means having a special bond with each and every person that works with you. This includes knowing their strengths, weakness, values, and goals. Helping people attain their goals and working to improve their knowledge will help them grow and keep them focused. Working in an environment that does not stimulate learning and creativity becomes dull and mundane. Turn education and creativity into a personal goal of your own by basing your success on your employee’s success. Do not hold back valuable lessons and techniques in order to make yourself feel like a superior technician or aesthetician. Educate, encourage, and push your staff to grow and excel in their practice. The successful ones will stay and grow and the lazy, unmotivated will leave.
Know your staff’s limitations. Scheduling, sales, and services are all part of our daily grind. Work with your employee schedule and attempt to accommodate requests. For example, some employees are comfortable with a part-time schedule. Do not open their books to accommodate more clientele unless it is discussed with the employee. Although we are in the service industry and always wish to get the clients on the books in a timely fashion, make these schedule changes the exception – not the rule. Changes in something as simple as a work schedule can become an issue to the employee that may have him/her seeking another place of employment. Some employees do not like to sell products to their clientele. Show them the art of the subtle sell or otherwise suggestive selling. When it comes to services, some are more aggressive, fast, or detailed. Employees who prefer to take 30 minutes to perform a brow wax, or are uncomfortable in performing bikini or brazilian waxing are not necessarily lazy, but need more practice, confidence, and/or instruction on their technique. Should you tell someone that you will only schedule five minutes to perform a service that they need 30 minutes to perform, they will probably perform that service poorly. As a business owner or manager it is your responsibility to find the balance with each of them while realizing that you may be able to mold them a little, but will not change their persona.

Artists in Aesthetician’s Clothing
Our industry is composed of creative people, artists in some cases. I feel we chose this field because people are our canvas and our goal is to create beautiful skin, bodies, hair, and even make-up. The services we provide make people feel good about their appearance and help improve their self-esteem. Many individuals, partners, or groups of people open a facility with the big corporate company idea or environment that they are accustomed to. Don’t forget that many of us have left, or are unhappy in the corporate setting due to the lack of freedom, or the passion of making people feel good about themselves. Change things up and add fun elements to your work environment. Employees feel valued and appreciated when they have the pleasure of voicing their opinion. Some of these fun elements can be as simple as adding their own personal décor in their treatment room or workspace. Even taking polls or voting on issues that address uniforms or proper dress attire and selling their favorite skin care line. Essentially this concept goes back to what was said earlier: treat people the way you would like to be treated. Respect their opinions, consideration, and a degree of self expression cannot be annihilated completely, as we are all human. It is our personality and our compassion that creates lasting impressions and relationships with our clients.

Managing the Frontlines
There comes a time when the decision comes to either run a business yourself as an owner and manager, or be the owner and hire a manager. If you choose to hire a manager, building a relationship with this person is of the utmost importance. A manager can either become your right hand or your worst enemy. Valuable characteristics in a facility manager include great team building skills, reflects the best interests of the company, and, most important, the fashion in which they treat the clients. Communication is key to any position, especially when your manager is reliable for maintaining communication to the staff, clients, and the owner.
Managers must also be reliable enough to handle sticky situations. These can include client-employee complaints and employee-employee complaints. A prime example of an employee-employee complaint manages to arise around birthdays. A solution that our manager has created and practiced is a monthly potluck. For those who are celebrating birthdays, the company buys the card and the cake and everyone signs the card and eats the goodies that were brought in for the luncheon. Gift exchanges can only be done after hours to avoid catty comments like, “she bought Suzy a gift and didn’t buy one for me” or “she didn’t spend that much money on my gift”. Potluck luncheons with company gifts have eliminated these spats in the workplace. In addition to celebrating birthdays, potluck luncheons are a great way to open monthly communications with your staff; business and pleasure combined.
Managers and owners need to maintain open communication and be understanding of each other. A good manager takes pride in the facility they’re running, give them the respect and freedom to show their talents. One of my personal weaknesses is that I tend to be overbearing on my managers and had a history of running them off. Several years later, I learned that a healthy respectful relationship with your manager will maintain a smooth running business. However, although you have great trust and respect, maintain an open door policy. If an employee-employee complaint arises, listen to each employee separately to understand each complaint. Next, bring them together and mediate the conversation. Through this, everyone is on the same page and problems truly get resolved without the unnecessary gossip and idle chat. Does this work when dealing with an all women facility? Yes. The same protocol holds true when you are reprimanding or firing a staff member. Your manager should always be present so you are both on the same page, but never give your manger the authority to fire an employee as that power should be reserved to the owner.

Slow Business Can Yield Great Production
If business is slow, put your staff to work. This can include simple phone calls and letters to clients, cleaning and chores, or education. Have a ‘product of the month’ sale that includes a quick meeting with your staff to go over the selling points of the item and how it works, then role-play sales pitches to each other. If business is slow or just starting out, create events with your staff and make it a team-building event, not a stressful situation. As a business owner, it is important to remember that your mood radiates through your business. Like a common cold, stress and anxiety can radiate from you, to your manager and to the staff. In turn, when the staff is unhappy, it’s hard to keep up a positive image to your clients. Keep your employees upbeat and busy. Again, this concept goes back to retaining valuable employees. A stressful work environment is a significant factor that will get your employee looking for a new job. The longer you can keep an employee, the more stable your business becomes. High turnover in our industry causes a loss in clientele and thus a loss in income. Maintain a positive work environment no matter what the situation, keep your staff busy (we all know there’s something to do) and make your facility successful.
When the day is done I’d like you to sit and think about your experiences as a receptionist, aesthetician, manager, or owner. Step back and think about some of your past coworkers/employees and what they gave you. What did you learn and how have they developed you? What events in your day have you learned from? This can include a suggestion or comment made by a fellow employee or one of your clients. We all learn from praise and scorn, but the key is take it all in and make your future judgments based off of these events. Practice a mindful mantra in your facility. Is your crew working together to make a successful practice? Without effective leadership and communication you have a slowly sinking ship. Remember that your employee’s are human, they make mistakes and they have personalities of their own. Keep a keen eye out when hiring and mold them for success, those who are not interested in learning will leave. The road to harmony, peace, love, happiness, and success is… well, what you make of it.

Tina Zillmann is a paramedical aesthetician, having a focus in acne care and light-peeling treatments. She is also the owner of the Skin Rejuvenation Clinique, Inc., a facility that services to pre- and post-operative patients. Zillmann also acts as a national educator for Advanced Rejuvenating Concepts™. Recently, she was the recipient of the Entrepreneur Spirit Award from the National Association of Women Business Owners.

 

 



Read More
By Jeremy Lawrence | January 21, 2019

Alexandra J. Zani is an international educator and speaker with a background in biology and medical technology. She holds an instructor license in cosmetology/aesthetics, is NCEA certified, and has received advanced certifications both in the U.S. and abroad in the dermal sciences, spa therapies, non-ablative laser, LED and microcurrent. Zani is an independent technical and scientific advisor and mentor for postgraduate studies in the medical spa industry, including cosmeceutical development. She presents education for advanced aesthetic technology, is a specialist in longevity, including the affects of nutrition, lifestyle and the mind/body connection. As an author and technical writer, she has written over 70 articles, technical manuals and has created a recent webinar series.

ZANI-LOGOThroughout her career, Zani has received several outstanding service awards for her role in professional business organizations.I have been in the aesthetics industry for over 27 years. From owning an image-consulting boutique in Ann Arbor, Mich. to being the educational director for a small laser college and distributor in British Columbia, a rather eclectic career path has given me amazing experiences and provided great opportunity for professional and personal growth. I learned early on to view challenging circumstances and individuals as teachers who showed up in my life at a specific point in time to direct my path so that I could learn and grow. "If only I had known then what I know now."– For me this statement rings true in that years ago, I might have also added a nursing degree into the scenario to add credibility to what I was trying to convey while attempting to bridge spa and wellness into a medical cosmetic surgery practice. Prior to opening your business … plan it carefully and deeply. One must build horizontally and vertically - building a solid infrastructure along with an inviting environment. Study your market wisely and find out what services are going to serve it the most. Sometimes keeping things simple is better than having every gadget, expensive machine and product. In my opinion … building customer loyalty is dependent on the quality and caring service extended to them by a skilled and educated staff that genuinely cares. There should be no guessing games when it comes to assessing the skin. It is important to understand the underlying causes of a skin condition. You cannot just begin a session without first performing a pathway of analysis. Education is important! I have a saying … "the more I learn, the less I know," meaning that each time I listen to a lecture or read a book, it opens more pathways for questioning and exploration. Mastery of your profession is a lifetime journey.It involves becoming a critical thinker and examining many viewpoints and considerations before coming to a conclusion. Critical thinking is a route to intellectual adventure and a process of making sound decisions based on facts and experience. In the aesthetics profession, you are making decisions every day, especially when assessing the best way to achieve results, these decisions should be made with as much knowledge as possible!

 

DERMASCOPE:

What various roles and positions have you held within this industry? continued…

 Alexandra:

In Ann Arbor, Mich. at the image-consulting boutique that I owned, I performed makeup consultations, color analysis, and sold skin care and accessories prior to attending school to complete studies in cosmetology and also offered a diploma in aesthetics. There was no separate esthetic licensing at the time. I traveled to participate in special weeklong classes from industry icons. A move to the Maryland/DC area provided an opportunity to open a full service skin care and spa therapy center. Additionally, I partnered with colleagues to offer public classes for dress and image enhancement for corporations and individuals. Moving west, I advised and directed aesthetic services for a Denver vein treatment clinic. The doctors pioneered some of the first CO2 laser resurfacing treatments in the country. Additionally, they worked with the earlier IPL lights for port wine stains and vascular lesions. I was also a consultant for a spa build out in a prestigious athletic facility as well as interim spa director. From there, I journeyed onward to Dallas to become corporate aesthetician for a leading private label and custom skin care manufacturer. My first project was to research and direct the formulations of an innovative vitamin C skin care line, including nutritional supplements. I traveled to trade shows, delivered national education, wrote technical manuals and articles, worked in product development, and provided support to sales staff and customers. Sadly, big companies often sell out and downsize causing many of us to move on to seek other employment. I worked in a Dallas medical spa with some of the first hair reduction and skin rejuvenation IPL systems. I journeyed onward into a consulting capacity and was acting general manager for an award-winning research physician to support his product reorganization and expansion. The adventure continued as I moved southward to work in a new medical spa as well as directed the creation of a full product line. I became the instructor for a new evening aesthetics program. In early 2006, I had the opportunity to become an education director for a small laser college and distributor in British Columbia. I returned to the U.S. in early fall of 2008, worked days in a medical office and taught the evening aesthetics program at a local medical vocational college. During the earlier years of my career, the aesthetics and spa industry was in its baby stages, and many of us had a huge vision for the future of this industry. Networking was key for one’s success. During the mid nineties, networking and education organizations manifested to support this industry. I was on the founding board and education director for the former Colorado Society of Aestheticians and Spa Therapists. Spas were hungry for continuing education and we filled the room during our quarterly education events. Additionally, I was a charter member of the American Aestheticians Education Association (AAEA) and presented seminars at their annual conferences.

 

DERMASCOPE:

Which of these taught you the most or had the most impact on you and how? continued…

Alexandra:

The accumulation of many experiences extending across several geographical regions greatly constructed the stage for directing my career and personal life. At times, things became perplexing. I soon learned that the only way to gain insight was to quietly go inward listening in the silence where I contemplated on my life’s purpose. I also had a couple of close mentors. In the bigger scheme of things, there really are no “bad” experiences. Undoubtedly being employed in a large multi-million dollar corporation opened my naïve eyes regarding the dynamics of being part of a large team. Variable talents and personalities offered the opportunity to work closely with brilliant cosmetic chemists. It taught me a great deal.

 

DERMASCOPE:

Has there been a constant theme that has led you from one point to the next throughout your training and career? (i.e. asking questions, reading certain material, etc.)

Alexandra:

Call me a workshop and book junkie! I have always surrounded myself with books, mounds of research papers, innovative ideas, and individuals who have provided amazing inspiration, even if they did not make sense at the time. I have had a life long desire for learning and to adventure into new experiences that extended far beyond my comfort zone. Consequently, I managed to move through some pretty interesting and/or humbling circumstances. As with many others during the earlier years in this industry, I attended as many events as possible – trade shows, manufacturer classes, wellness classes, integrative medicine conferences, leadership and personal development classes, and just about anything that would bring greater knowledge so that I could offer a better service to my clients and students. I have met amazing individuals along the way who were most inspiring. I must say that without the encouragement of many, I would not be where I am today. A consistent theme has always been the underlying mission that we are all here to make a difference in the life of others. It is through serving others that we expand our universal horizons and are able to become role models. We have a profession that is hands-on and speaks greatly of prevention and wellness – in mind, body and spirit.

 

DERMASCOPE:

What has surprised you most during your professional journey? Do you have any regrets, or is there any one thing you can point to and think, “I wish I would have done that differently” or “if only I had known then what I know now.” continued…

Alexandra:

Given my present knowledge, I would have made better business decisions earlier on by asking the right questions as to expectations and also do a better job of negotiating contracts. Years ago, I might have also added a nursing degree into the scenario to add credibility to what I was trying to convey while attempting to bridge spa and wellness into a medical cosmetic surgery practice. It is truly inspiring to watch the transformation of an aesthetics student as they sit in your classroom where you teach them the necessary skills of their chosen profession. Some may surprise us with their ability to grasp complicated information. We can only do life with the knowledge and experience we have at any given moment so there are really no regrets. What is most amazing is that each of us has an innate strength that appropriately shows up at the right time when we listen and take on the challenge of moving beyond what we think is possible.

 

DERMASCOPE:

Why do you think people come to a particular spa/skin care clinic? continued…

Alexandra:

The facility must be clean, attractive and provide a feeling of peace and renewal. Staff members who walk their talk become role models in their profession. Sending and providing support to each other is part of being on a team. This caring energy is immediately sensed from the moment a customer walks through the portal. What patients also embrace are treatments and products that provide results.

 

DERMASCOPE:

What do you believe separates the best clinics from the rest? continued…

Alexandra:

As I mentioned earlier, the ambiance and feeling of being welcomed into a very caring, professional, results-oriented environment builds loyalty. Also, become a good listener. Does a client desire a simple relaxing facial or massage, or do they have concerns that require a little more in-depth approach for skin correction. Not to be underestimated, and indeed may set you apart from the rest, is the importance in keeping an open door for health challenged individuals such as cancer survivors or others who would normally be turned away at other spas. Offering Oncology Aesthetic services is a growing trend that requires specialized training. However, it will greatly enhance your uniqueness.

 

DERMASCOPE:

Do you have a signature treatment or modality that you feel is a classic of sorts? And, why do you feel this way?

Alexandra:

During my years of practice, what fostered repeat business was that I took the time to do a thorough skin analysis (actually it was a separate service), and then developed a plan of management for whatever the concerns. I carefully analyzed not only the customer’s skin but reviewed their current products and regimen. Additionally, I also had them complete a health-intake form to help detect any underlying causes of a skin challenge. I love enzymes. I am also in favor of microcurrent and/or LED, specialized masks, and of course, when deemed appropriate, a massage. Also, when offered, body wraps using Moor mud mixed with essentials oils are so therapeutic. I always felt that the first hands-on session should build a customer’s confidence in my skills. A simple session involving a thorough cleansing, enzyme and application of appropriate products, including a concentrate, a mask also gave me an indication as to how their skin was going to respond during future treatments.

 

DERMASCOPE:

What tool or tools would your treatment room not be complete without? Why?

Alexandra:

Technology is ever evolving. There are newer generations of microcurrent, LED, and sonophoresis. The core choices for equipment depends a great deal on the focus of the service and the type of environment in which you are working. Are you offering basic services or are you going to add a little more technology? Having a good loop lamp, Woods lamp/skin scanner, a steamer, iontophoresis, high frequency is a start. Additionally, invest in a comfortable facial chair and be aware of your room ergonomics. This may sound elementary, but after you do your homework – market study, attend a trade show to view all the new innovations in this industry, speak to lots of people, take the time to develop a plan of action including a budget. Purchase your equipment and products only after you are clear on what you are doing. Moreover, the further you understand the dermal sciences, skin conditions and disease, and product chemistry, the better decisions you will make for machines and treatment products.

 

DERMASCOPE:

What adaptations have you made over the years to stay relevant in the treatment room?

Alexandra:

Contrasted to what we did years ago, I recommend a slower approach to skin correction and treatment. At one time we thought that the way for correction was to become aggressive at the beginning – choosing microdermabrasion, skin peels and aggressive treatments (including laser) since we thought that they were an answer to most skin conditions. Fast forward to 2012; some of the newer technologies and methods for skin correction may support a simpler treatment room. We now have learned that there is a great deal of “cell talk” occurring between keratinocytes, melanocytes and fibroblasts. We also do not want to promote excessive immune response through heat shock, stimulation of the wrong cell growth factors or remove too much of the epidermis. Approaching more aggressive treatments should be carefully assessed after you have helped repair the epidermis and acid mantle. The skin has an amazing ability to self-correct when given the correct remedies.

 

DERMASCOPE:

Is there a particular moment or procedure where most aestheticians go wrong? What could they alter for a better result? continued…

Alexandra:

… Yes, the client is gravely concerned about her skin and perhaps the pigmentation that showed up on her face. As a professional, study the melanogensis story and the lifecycle of a melanocyte. So many times, the poor melanocyte receives a destructive blow with little thought of the consequences. Education, education … education!

 

DERMASCOPE:

Realizing you are an educator: How does one cut through all the marketing to find the line(s) that are right for them?

Alexandra:

The health of the skin depends upon many things that go beyond beautiful packaging. When asked about what skin line to choose, my response is that the technologies have changed during the past few years. It is futile to place one line up against the other. Instead, I recommend that we acquire a better understanding of cosmetic ingredients and their relationship to the skin. There are advanced improvements of actives that are more stabilized and effective in supporting skin structures. New innovative delivery systems utilizing the nano and liposome technologies can effectively deliver ingredients without the use of some irritating emulsifiers that may be detrimental to sensitive skin. One should be mindful of several details including (1) gaining a clearer understanding of cell structures and systems, (2) what nutrients make up a cell membrane, and the function of the skin barrier – particularly the bilayers, (3) the importance of matching product composition to skin structure, and (4) what ingredients may be counterproductive to optimum skin health. We should become one with the keratinocyte … think like it … and understand what makes it healthy and what damages it. Additionally, when we grasp the innuendos of skin conditions, and how they are formed in the first place, we can transition into a more confident pathway for correction. Product choices will flow more comfortably. Honoring and protecting the epidermis at all times becomes a motto for success. When you understand the underlying causes (not symptoms) of skin conditions, then you will easily move into a product line that complements your work.

 

DERMASCOPE:

As an educator, what is your secret to keeping life in balance and enjoying the journey?

Alexandra:

After many years of working long hours in this profession, rushing to catch flights, returning home from late night airport parking lots, I made a decision in 2008 to return to the U.S. to restructure the rest of my personal and career life. I now work from a virtual office in rural America connected by Internet and telephone with an airport one hour away. Many of you may be just beginning your career. Develop positives habits to re-charge your mind and body. Eat nourishing food; take walks in nature; listen to beautiful music; do yoga; practice mindful meditation; explore spirituality … and so on. Do whatever it takes to give yourself a break. If you are in a busy urban environment, nurture a few potted patio plants; spend quality time with your loved ones. Surround yourself with those who are positive and supporting. Speak inspiration … live inspiration, and be mindful of thoughts and words.

 

DERMASCOPE:

It is obvious that education plays a significant role in your personal and professional life. Please elaborate on why you feel it is important for aestheticians to hold education in a high regard? continued…

Alexandra:

… Taking the time to attend a class will optimize your ability in becoming more mindful and responsible practitioners. If you are a teacher, advanced education promotes your effectiveness in the classroom.

 

DERMASCOPE:

Can you please elaborate on PASTICHE? The inspiration behind the company, what it is, what it does, and the significance it has for yourself and our industry?

Alexandra:

As a partner with Pastiche Resources in New Zealand, it is a privilege to sponsor an industry icon, Florence Barrett-Hill, who has spent 30 years in this industry. I first met Barrett-Hill in 2006 after reading her book, Advanced Skin Analysis and her later book, Cosmetic Chemistry, her work has profoundly benefited over a 3000+ individuals – aestheticians, physicians, nurses and also brand-specific companies. Her accolades can be found in the testimonials of her students. There are so many of us worldwide who have had the privilege of sitting in her classroom where she stretched our minds beyond what we thought could be possible. Many of us graduates repeat her classes each year since it re-enforces what we learned the previous year. It offers a continuous forum to listen with more experienced ears as well as hear the latest research. Barrett-Hill owned and directed clinics where she gained a passion for working with burn survivors and plastic surgery patients. She pioneered skin care modalities including the formulation of specialized skin care products, in order to support skin that had been so compromised. A talented industry practitioner, she intimately knows her subject. She has a passion to elevate the standards of professional beauty therapy and skin care. That is why she works diligently and persistently to research, write and teach so that future generations can excel in their profession with knowledge, skill, and respect. She travels internationally, including to the U.S., sharing her knowledge with individuals and groups who collectively enforce her philosophy that the future of professional skin care lies within a scientific foundation. Spending almost 30 hours of class with her can be a career-altering event!



Read More
By Jeremy Lawrence | January 21, 2019

More than one million Americans are diagnosed with skin cancer each year. Many more are diagnosed with pre-cancerous conditions. These numbers continue to increase, not only in the U.S., but worldwide. Despite the alarming increase in skin cancers, especially in the teen and young adult population, people continue to believe that a tan is healthy. The notion that sunscreen is an occasional summer-only accessory is still prevalent, yet mistaken. Several factors are responsible for the alarming rise in skin cancer. The continual erosion of the Earth’s ozone layer due to pollution has led to a decrease in the amount of ozone protection than was afforded previous generations.

Also, unlike previous generations, today there are over 400 medications prescribed that leave patients with an increased sensitivity to sun exposure and a heightened susceptibility to sun damage. The lengthening of the average life expectancy is an additional contributing factor.

(excerpted from Therapeutic SunCare)

Greater awareness, increased patient concern, and improvements in diagnostic techniques may help to decrease this alarming rise in the rate of skin cancer. Perhaps the most important factor in the rise of skin cancer rates is the increase in exposure to the UVA wavelength. Previously thought of as harmless, the UVA wavelength is now known to contribute significantly to skin damage, skin cancer, DNA damage, and immune system suppression. UVA rays penetrate the skin deeper and, unlike UVB rays (which cause initial redness and burning), create damage that is not immediately detected.

Because UVA rays remain constant throughout the year and during the entire day, people are exposed to them continually, whether it is midday in July, or 4 p.m. on an overcast winter afternoon. When it comes to the appearance of the skin, wrinkling and thinning of the skin are often thought of as a natural aging process. We now know that these effects are primarily the result of long-term exposure to sunlight. Cumulative exposure to the sun damages the epidermis (the outer layer) and the dermis, (the deeper layer where the skin’s framework exists), causing elastin fibers to thicken and become more numerous. Damage to the collagen causes it to undergo degradation. As a result of this degradation, “reticulin” fibers are deposited throughout the entire dermis, rather than remaining in the limited region outlining the specific dermal-epidermal junction.

With some simple and consistent steps, sun damaged skin can be avoided, even repaired. Sun related damage can be minimized and some damage can be reversed. A crucial step, however, is one’s awareness that sun protection must be used daily and year-round. Children, in particular, need to use sunscreen. Frequent sun exposure and sunburn in childhood must be avoided as these appear to set the stage for high rates of melanoma in later life. A comprehensive sun protection program includes the use of sunscreen as well as the use of sun-protective clothing, sunglasses, and sun avoidance between 10 a.m. and 4 p.m.

The Facts of Light:

• Every seven minutes someone dies of Melanoma.

• Sun damage to the skin is cumulative.

• Not all skin is the same. Different skin types respond differently to sunlight. Know your skin type and determine what exposure is safe for you.

• A suntan can do you more harm than good. A suntan is actually a sign of skin damage. Any level of tanning indicates photo-damage that will lead to wrinkling, aging, and skin cancer.

• The skin has a memory of all the sun damage that has happened to it over the entire life of an individual. A high cumulative effect results in a greater susceptibility to skin cancer.

• Normal, healthy skin acts as a barrier and protects us from injury. Our skin regulates our temperature, receives sensory impulses, and synthesizes vitamin D.

• The skin is the largest organ in the human body.

• More than 90 percent of non-melanoma skin cancers occur in fair skinned people who tend to burn. However, even though the incidence of skin cancer is lower in dark skinned people, they are still susceptible to the damaging effects of UV radiation. They are also susceptible to the effects of the sun on the eye and on the immune system.

Sunlight has its Benefits…

Sunlight is a primary source for vitamin D. This helps keep our bones strong. The current recommended daily intake of vitamin D is 200 IU from birth to age 50, 400 IU between age 51 and 70, and 600 IU after age 71. Recent studies suggest that 1,000 IU a day may reduce the incidence of certain cancers — such as cancers of the ovary, breast, and colon — by as much as 50 percent. That is because vitamin D strengthens the immune system and supports cell growth. Vitamin D requirements can be fulfilled: through dietary sources (a serving of oily fish contains between 250 and 360 IU, and one tablespoon of cod liver oil has 1,360 IU); or through supplements (alone or combined with calcium).

Why SPF is Not Sufficient

A number assigned to a sunscreen represents the factor by which the time required for unprotected skin to become sunburned can be increased through the application of a sunscreen. Also called sun protection factor (SPF).

It is important to recognize that an SPF rating does not adequately measure protection from all the damaging radiation effects of light. SPF is only a determination of protection from one specific wavelength of ultraviolet radiation, the UVB wavelength (290nm–320nm). Unfortunately, there is no currently approved or accepted standard in the United States to rate the quality of a sunscreen’s protective capabilities concerning UVA wavelengths. UVA (320nm–400nm) is the deeper penetrating wavelength, more often associated with the signs of photo-damage, such as wrinkling, pigmentation changes, and dryness. The SPF rating system does not accurately or completely define a sunscreen’s protective capabilities from all harmful ultraviolet radiation, ONLY the UVB wavelength.

UVB exposure results in a red, painful irritation first experienced during early sun exposure, but UVB is not the only ultraviolet wavelength damaging to the skin. In fact, UVB causes only a minimal effect upon the deeper depth of skin. However, UVA damage penetrates much deeper. Therefore, UVB and UVA radiation are both recognized as causes of skin cancer. SPF 30 is not enough to address the full effect of ultraviolet light on the skin, only UVB.

The technical explanation of the benefits of 30+ SPF is complicated. For instance, an SPF 15 product blocks 93 percent of incidental UVB light, while SPF 34 blocks 97 percent of incidental UVB, a seemingly insignificant difference. However, Dr. Kays Kaidbey completed an instructive model using human skin volunteers. He showed that when skin was exposed to enough simulated solar radiation to cause the beginning of redness, skin protected with an SPF 30 sunscreen suffered 2.5 times fewer sunburn damaged cells than skin protected with an SPF 15 sunscreen. Thus came the knowledge that there is at least a two-fold difference in the protection offered by higher SPFs.

The Facts of Light

• Use of a higher SPF sunscreen helps overcome “user-errors”: e.g., in general, sunscreen use is sporadic, and reapplication is not frequent enough or with enough sunscreen.

• The accuracy of the SPF number is questionable. A greater amount of sunscreen is generally applied during testing than when sunscreen is applied during general use. This creates the reality that the true SPF number is about 1/2 or 1/3 of the stated number

• When utilizing titanium dioxide and zinc oxide, the higher the SPF, the greater the UVA coverage.

• SPF merely addresses the UVB wavelength not the UVA, UVC, visible, or infrared light wavelengths.

• The UVA ray is more difficult to study on human subjects due to the length of time it takes for UVA skin damage to appear. Aging of skin or the mutating of skin cells is a cumulative effect and can take decades to manifest fully.

Sun Protection Factor Efficacy

SPF Value ---- %UV Rays Absorbed or Reflected ---- %UV Rays Transmitted (1/SPF Value)

2 ---- 50% ---- 50%

4 ---- 75% ---- 25%

6 ---- 83.33% ---- 16.7%

8 ---- 87.5% ---- 12.5%

10 ---- 90% ---- 10%

15 ---- 93.33% ---- 6.7%

25 ---- 96% ---- 4%

30 ---- 96.78% ---- 3.3%

35 ---- 97.14% ---- 2.8%

40 ---- 97.5% ---- 2.5%

50 ---- 98% ---- 2%

60 ---- 98.4% ---- 1.6%

100 ---- 99% ---- 1%

 

The Chemistry of Sunscreen

Myths concerning sunscreens abound, such as the following:

Myth: Applying sunscreen every morning affords ample sun protection.

Truth: Frequent and adequate reapplication of a full spectrum sunscreen is essential due to moisture loss and rubbing.

Sunscreen: (s n skr n ) n. Chemical or physical agents that protect the skin from sunburn and erythema by absorbing or blocking ultraviolet radiation. A preparation, often in the form of a cream or lotion, used to protect the skin from the ultraviolet rays of the sun.

Sunscreens use chemical absorbers and/or physical blockers formulated to protect the skin. This section provides brief technical descriptions of how sunscreens work.

PHYSICAL BLOCKERS: As physical blockers, sunscreens fall into three categories:

• Direct physical blockers

• Indirect blockers that assist by increasing distribution of direct blockers

• Polymers, often starch derived, that substantially increase the effective length of the pathway that the sun’s rays must travel to reach the skin.

Direct Physical Photoblockers

Most of the physical photoblockers are compounds of naturally occurring metals (iron, chromium, zinc, titanium, etc). While some, such as bismuth, are man-made. In addition to their photoprotective attributes, these substances also assist in preventing windburns and the skin damage that results from wind driven micro particles of dirt and grime. An additional significant property of these physical blockers is their ability to offer a defense against infrared (“heat”) rays. They do so by two distinct means.

First, particles large enough to be visible (i.e. to reflect visible light) also reflect and refract the infrared waves most harmful to skin (760nm—1,800nm). Second, regardless of their particle size, these metal-based materials act as a “heat sink” and thereby reduce the heat effect on the skin.

Three important photoprotective blockers are discussed in this section: Titanium Dioxide Zinc Oxide, and Iron Oxides.

Titanium Dioxide

Titanium Dioxide is widely used as a white pigment powder in cosmetics. The purpose of incorporating large particles of titanium is to give opacity to the products containing it, and to lighten (or whiten) their color. Opaque titanium dioxide greatly reflects and scatters all UV and visible rays. It also reflects much of the skin-damaging waves of infrared light. This keeps the skin cooler, reduces “heat” damage, and prevents subsequent photoaging.

To photo-stabilize titanium dioxide, it must be micro-coated with protectants such as silicone or aluminum oxide. Since titanium dioxide spreads poorly on the skin, an additional process must be incorporated to ensure that its protective effect is spread evenly over the skin surface. To achieve cosmetic elegance and usefulness, micro-coating of the titanium dioxide is employed. This is facilitated by designing a vehicle that assures good, even application to the skin. This step is essential. Large particle titanium dioxide products produce a very white, opaque appearance on the skin when applied. Therefore, submicronizing the titanium dioxide powder is performed. The process of submicronization creates small particles that effectively create a larger surface area, better able to absorb visible light. This enables the resultant product to offer highly efficient sun protection that helps protect the skin from a great deal of both UVB and UVA radiation, while remaining invisible on the skin.

Transparent (sub-micronized) titanium dioxide works by absorbing, reflecting and scattering most UVB and some UVA rays. Additionally, protection against UV, visible and infrared is significantly limited when submicronized titanium dioxide is the primary protectant.

Zinc Oxide

Zinc Oxide has been known and used topically for centuries as a skin protectant and wound healing adjuvant. It has been recognized as a mild antimicrobial agent. More than 50 years ago, zinc oxide was used as a block for ultraviolet light (UVB/UVA). It also reflects infrared light from the skin, as does titanium dioxide. Its ability to protect in the long UVA range, (300—400 nm), however, is much higher than that of titanium dioxide. Zinc oxide absorbs, rather than scatters most UVA, while titanium dioxide primarily scatters these wavelengths. Thus, formulated in combination with titanium dioxide, ultrafine zinc oxide “closes the window” in the UVA range. Zinc oxide works to both complement titanium dioxide’s protection and to extend photoprotection to the skin where titanium dioxide is insufficient. The optimal particle size range for ultraviolet blocking zinc oxide (without blocking visible wavelengths) is approximately 80 to 150 nanometers. (1,000 nanometers = 1 micron)

Iron Oxides

We most commonly see iron oxide in two areas; as rust on exposed iron and in cosmetics, where it is employed to give the cover-up color desired. While not approved by the FDA as an active ingredient in sunscreens, many companies use iron oxides in their sunscreen products. Cosmetic iron oxides are man-made to very high levels of purity, desired color and particle size.

Iron oxide pigments for cosmetic use are micronized powders. By controlling the purity, particle size, temperature, and rate of drying during manufacture, they have become available in a number of shades and tones of red, yellow, black, and brown (and blends of these basic colors). These cosmetic pigments, if incorporated at adequate concentrations and when properly dispersed in well-designed vehicles, not only add color to the lotion (or cream, powder, etc.), but contribute significantly to protecting the skin from many wavelengths of light.

Ultra-submicronized iron oxides protect against visible light waves, yet add little color to the finished product. This allows for the addition of higher levels of infrared protecting iron oxide while retaining the cosmetic elegance and shade of the final preparation. Considerable blocking of ultraviolet rays is also reported with submicronized iron oxides, complementing further the primary UV blocking agents.

Indirect Physical Blocker Aids

Examples of these particles can be natural talc or mica. They are usually flat and oval in shape. They are very small particles, though they are much larger than direct physical blockers. A portion of very small physical blocker particles will coat the larger flat talc (mica, etc.). Being flat and smooth, the coated particles of talc easily slide over each other, overlapping themselves and effectively increasing protective coverage on the skin.

Polymers

Polymers can be natural substances from plants, modified semi-natural, animal derived substances (modified chitin, from the “shells” of shrimp etc. is commonly employed) or synthetic substances such as micronized nylon. Certain polymers, when carefully formulated into a photoprotective preparation, create a maze–like “cage” structure that forces the ultraviolet and visible rays (100nm–760nm) to go through a “maze” rather than reaching the skin directly. This longer route helps to protect the skin from these rays by preventing some rays from reaching the skin, by causing some rays to reach the skin after some of their energy has dissipated, and by increasing the contact time between the rays and the organic filters/physical blockers. By themselves, such polymers (which incidentally also improve the feel of the cosmetic finished product on the skin) do little to provide skin photo­protection. They help to defend the skin from wind and wind-blown dirt and grime pollution particles. However in the presence of active photoprotective agents, these polymers can increase the Sun Protection Factor (SPF) by three to five points.

CHEMICAL ABSORBERS/ORGANIC FILTERS

Chemical Sunscreens (also known as Organic Filters) are usually soluble in oils or water. These filter either/or UVB and UVA irradiation to varying degrees of efficiency. No organic filter completely blocks the UVB and/or UVA rays from the skin. Further, the actual protection offered by any and all sun-protective products relates directly to their level of concentration: the thickness of the film applied to the skin, as well as the careful, total coverage of the exposed skin sites.

The most common chemical absorbers used in sunscreens include:

Octyl Salicylate - Salicylates are the oldest class of sunscreens, with octyl salicylate the most widely used. While it is strictly a UVB absorber, and a weak one at that, it offers several positive qualities, including:

• Octyl salicylate is virtually nonirritating and nonsensitizing to skin.

• Cosmetically, octyl salicylate is an easy to handle emollient “oil” that acts as a good solvent (solubilizer) for other, solid organic sunscreens, such as the benzophenones.

Octyl Dimethyl PABA (Padimate O) - This oil-like UVB absorber is the most efficient for this ultraviolet range. It absorbs best at the maximum sunburn frequencies (310nm–312nm). It had been the most popular UVB sunscreen in the United States, but adverse reports (not necessarily proven) have reduced its use. Padimate-O is a PABA derivative, but quite distinct. Today’s purified material is essentially free of PABA.

Octyl Methoxycinnamate - Currently, this oily liquid is the most widely utilized organic UVB absorber used in the world. It is second in efficiency to Padimate-O, yet offers broad­er protection (300nm –315nm) in the sunburn region of UVB. It has a very good safety record and is relatively easy to formulate. Additionally, it is moisturizing and water insoluble, adhering tenaciously to the skin.

Menthyl Anthranilate - An old and safe, yet overall weak, absorber. Menthyl anthranilate absorbs moderately in the UVB range from about 300nm and somewhat more strongly into the UVA (up to about 340nm). It can somewhat enhance the UVB and lower (320nm to 340nm) UVA absorption of more active absorbers.

Oxybenzone (Benzophenone-3) and Sulisobenzone (Benzophenone-4) - These are closely related solid (powder) absorbers. Oxybenzone is water–insoluble, yet the acid form, sulisobenzone, can be made soluble in water when it is neutralized. While these compounds are classified as UVA absorbers they are also UVB absorbers. Overall, they offer only moderate protection through both the UVB range and part of the UVA (320nm – 360nm). They are quite stable and can enhance effectiveness of stronger UVB absorbers.

Avobenzone (Parsol®1789) - This solid (powder) absorber exhibits marginal UVB and lower (320nm – 330nm) UVA absorption. It provides good UVA absorption from about 330nm to 340nm and very good absorption in the UVA range up to about 370nm. At that level, it rapidly loses effectiveness. Because of its irritation potential, it is only permitted to be used in low concentration levels. Accordingly, this limits the actual level of protection obtainable. In addition, in the presence of sunlight, avobenzone can convert to its inactive form and readily loses more than one-third (1/3) of its active form rather quickly. Therefore, avobenzone (Parsol 1789) has useful, yet limited, UVA protection. Its usefulness can be enhanced by combining with UVB absorbers and physical protectors, such as zinc oxide.

Octocrylene - An emollient, water resistant UVB/UVA absorber. While octocrylene is a relatively weak sunscreen, it gives some protection in the UVB and lower (320to 350 nm) UVA range. Most importantly, octocrylene is a very stable absorber and both protects and augments other UV absorbers, and also improves their ability to provide a uniform coating of the skin.

The history of incorporating ultraviolet light filters into personal care products has grown enormously. This is due to both an increased awareness of the damaging effects of ultraviolet radiation on the skin, and a desire to build market presence based on a consumer driven demand.

Unfortunately, the traditional rating system utilizing SPF (sun protection factor) is not acceptable as a true measure of protection from the long-term effects of ultraviolet damage, since it fails to incorporate the damage as a result of the ultraviolet A wavelength. Currently, multiple FDA approved UVA active ingredients are marketed, and a new UVA chemical filter has recently received FDA approval, while others await the FDA’s evaluation. Yet it is not until a final FDA approved document exists that clarifies the complicated UVA rating system, that we will be able to truly determine a products level of UVA protection.

Dr. Harry Fallick has been involved in the clinical treatment of skin cancer for over twenty years. As a triple board certified surgeon, he developed a special interest in the treatment of photo damaged skin. Since founding Fallene, Ltd. in 1989, he has focused his attention on the development of ultra protective full spectrum sunscreens.



Read More
By | January 21, 2019

by Harry Fallick

(excerpted from Therapeutic SunCare)

More than one million Americans are diagnosed with skin cancer each year. Many more are diagnosed with pre-cancerous conditions. These numbers continue to increase, not only in the U.S., but worldwide. Despite the alarming increase in skin cancers, especially in the teen and young adult population, people continue to believe that a tan is healthy. The notion that sunscreen is an occasional summer-only accessory is still prevalent, yet mistaken.

Several factors are responsible for the alarming rise in skin cancer. The continual erosion of the Earth’s ozone layer due to pollution has led to a decrease in the amount of ozone protection than was afforded previous generations. Also, unlike previous generations, today there are over 400 medications prescribed that leave patients with an increased sensitivity to sun exposure and a heightened susceptibility to sun damage. The lengthening of the average life expectancy is an additional contributing factor.

Greater awareness, increased patient concern, and improvements in diagnostic techniques may help to decrease this alarming rise in the rate of skin cancer.

Perhaps the most important factor in the rise of skin cancer rates is the increase in exposure to the UVA wavelength. Previously thought of as harmless, the UVA wavelength is now known to contribute significantly to skin damage, skin cancer, DNA damage, and immune system suppression. UVA rays penetrate the skin deeper and, unlike UVB rays (which cause initial redness and burning), create damage that is not immediately detected.

Because UVA rays remain constant throughout the year and during the entire day, people are exposed to them continually, whether it is midday in July, or 4 p.m. on an overcast winter afternoon.

When it comes to the appearance of the skin, wrinkling and thinning of the skin are often thought of as a natural aging process. We now know that these effects are primarily the result of long-term exposure to sunlight. Cumulative exposure to the sun damages the epidermis (the outer layer) and the dermis, (the deeper layer where the skin’s framework exists), causing elastin fibers to thicken and become more numerous. Damage to the collagen causes it to undergo degradation. As a result of this degradation, “reticulin” fibers are deposited throughout the entire dermis, rather than remaining in the limited region outlining the specific dermal-epidermal junction.

With some simple and consistent steps, sun damaged skin can be avoided, even repaired. Sun related damage can be minimized and some damage can be reversed. A crucial step, however, is one’s awareness that sun protection must be used daily and year-round.

Children, in particular, need to use sunscreen. Frequent sun exposure and sunburn in childhood must be avoided as these appear to set the stage for high rates of melanoma in later life. A comprehensive sun protection program includes the use of sunscreen as well as the use of sun-protective clothing, sunglasses, and sun avoidance between 10 a.m. and 4 p.m.

The Facts of Light:

Every seven minutes someone dies of Melanoma.

• Sun damage to the skin is cumulative.

• Not all skin is the same. Different skin types respond differently to sunlight. Know your skin type and determine what exposure is safe for you.

• A suntan can do you more harm than good. A suntan is actually a sign of skin damage. Any level of tanning indicates photo-damage that will lead to wrinkling, aging, and skin cancer.

• The skin has a memory of all the sun damage that has happened to it over the entire life of an individual. A high cumulative effect results in a greater susceptibility to skin cancer.

• Normal, healthy skin acts as a barrier and protects us from injury. Our skin regulates our temperature, receives sensory impulses, and synthesizes vitamin D.

• The skin is the largest organ in the human body.

• More than 90 percent of non-melanoma skin cancers occur in fair skinned people who tend to burn. However, even though the incidence of skin cancer is lower in dark skinned people, they are still susceptible to the damaging effects of UV radiation. They are also susceptible to the effects of the sun on the eye and on the immune system.

Sunlight has its Benefits…

Sunlight is a primary source for vitamin D. This helps keep our bones strong. The current recommended daily intake of vitamin D is 200 IU from birth to age 50, 400 IU between age 51 and 70, and 600 IU after age 71.

Recent studies suggest that 1,000 IU a day may reduce the incidence of certain cancers — such as cancers of the ovary, breast, and colon — by as much as 50 percent. That is because vitamin D strengthens the immune system and supports cell growth.

Vitamin D requirements can be fulfilled: through dietary sources (a serving of oily fish contains between 250 and 360 IU, and one tablespoon of cod liver oil has 1,360 IU); or through supplements (alone or combined with calcium).

Why SPF is Not Sufficient

A number assigned to a sunscreen represents the factor by which the time required for unprotected skin to become sunburned can be increased through the application of a sunscreen. Also called sun protection factor (SPF).

It is important to recognize that an SPF rating does not adequately measure protection from all the damaging radiation effects of light. SPF is only a determination of protection from one specific wavelength of ultraviolet radiation, the UVB wavelength (290nm–320nm). Unfortunately, there is no currently approved or accepted standard in the United States to rate the quality of a sunscreen’s protective capabilities concerning UVA wavelengths. UVA (320nm–400nm) is the deeper penetrating wavelength, more often associated with the signs of photo-damage, such as wrinkling, pigmentation changes, and dryness. The SPF rating system does not accurately or completely define a sunscreen’s protective capabilities from all harmful ultraviolet radiation, ONLY the UVB wavelength.

UVB exposure results in a red, painful irritation first experienced during early sun exposure, but UVB is not the only ultraviolet wavelength damaging to the skin. In fact, UVB causes only a minimal effect upon the deeper depth of skin. However, UVA damage penetrates much deeper. Therefore, UVB and UVA radiation are both recognized as causes of skin cancer. SPF 30 is not enough to address the full effect of ultraviolet light on the skin, only UVB.

The technical explanation of the benefits of 30+ SPF is complicated. For instance, an SPF 15 product blocks 93 percent of incidental UVB light, while SPF 34 blocks 97 percent of incidental UVB, a seemingly insignificant difference. However, Dr. Kays Kaidbey completed an instructive model using human skin volunteers. He showed that when skin was exposed to enough simulated solar radiation to cause the beginning of redness, skin protected with an SPF 30 sunscreen suffered 2.5 times fewer sunburn damaged cells than skin protected with an SPF 15 sunscreen. Thus came the knowledge that there is at least a two-fold difference in the protection offered by higher SPFs.

The Facts of Light

• Use of a higher SPF sunscreen helps overcome “user-errors”: e.g., in general, sunscreen use is sporadic, and reapplication is not frequent enough or with enough sunscreen.

• The accuracy of the SPF number is questionable. A greater amount of sunscreen is generally applied during testing than when sunscreen is applied during general use. This creates the reality that the true SPF number is about 1/2 or 1/3 of the stated number

• When utilizing titanium dioxide and zinc oxide, the higher the SPF, the greater the UVA coverage.

• SPF merely addresses the UVB wavelength not the UVA, UVC, visible, or infrared light wavelengths.

• The UVA ray is more difficult to study on human subjects due to the length of time it takes for UVA skin damage to appear. Aging of skin or the mutating of skin cells is a cumulative effect and can take decades to manifest fully.

Sun Protection Factor Efficacy


SPF Value %UV Rays Absorbed or Reflected %UV Rays Transmitted (1/SPF Value)


2 50% 50%

4 75% 25%

6 83.33% 16.7%

8 87.5% 12.5%

10 90% 10%

15 93.33% 6.7%

25 96% 4%

30 96.78% 3.3%

35 97.14% 2.8%

40 97.5% 2.5%

50 98% 2%

60 98.4% 1.6%

100 99% 1%

The Chemistry of Sunscreen

Myths concerning sunscreens abound, such as the following

Myth: Applying sunscreen every morning affords ample sun protection.

Truth: Frequent and adequate reapplication of a full spectrum sunscreen is essential due to moisture loss and rubbing.

Sunscreen: (s n skr n ) n. Chemical or physical agents that protect the skin from sunburn and erythema by absorbing or blocking ultraviolet radiation. A preparation, often in the form of a cream or lotion, used to protect the skin from the ultraviolet rays of the sun.

Sunscreens use chemical absorbers and/or physical blockers formulated to protect the skin. This section provides brief technical descriptions of how sunscreens work.

PHYSICAL BLOCKERS: As physical blockers, sunscreens fall into three categories:

• Direct physical blockers

• Indirect blockers that assist by increasing distribution of direct blockers

• Polymers, often starch derived, that substantially increase the effective length of the pathway that the sun’s rays must travel to reach the skin.

Direct Physical Photoblockers

Most of the physical photoblockers are compounds of naturally occurring metals (iron, chromium, zinc, titanium, etc). While some, such as bismuth, are man-made. In addition to their photoprotective attributes, these substances also assist in preventing windburns and the skin damage that results from wind driven micro particles of dirt and grime. An additional significant property of these physical blockers is their ability to offer a defense against infrared (“heat”) rays. They do so by two distinct means.

First, particles large enough to be visible (i.e. to reflect visible light) also reflect and refract the infrared waves most harmful to skin (760nm—1,800nm). Second, regardless of their particle size, these metal-based materials act as a “heat sink” and thereby reduce the heat effect on the skin.

Three important photoprotective blockers are discussed in this section: Titanium Dioxide Zinc Oxide, and Iron Oxides.

Titanium Dioxide

Titanium Dioxide is widely used as a white pigment powder in cosmetics. The purpose of incorporating large particles of titanium is to give opacity to the products containing it, and to lighten (or whiten) their color. Opaque titanium dioxide greatly reflects and scatters all UV and visible rays. It also reflects much of the skin-damaging waves of infrared light. This keeps the skin cooler, reduces “heat” damage, and prevents subsequent photoaging.

To photo-stabilize titanium dioxide, it must be micro-coated with protectants such as silicone or aluminum oxide. Since titanium dioxide spreads poorly on the skin, an additional process must be incorporated to ensure that its protective effect is spread evenly over the skin surface. To achieve cosmetic elegance and usefulness, micro-coating of the titanium dioxide is employed. This is facilitated by designing a vehicle that assures good, even application to the skin. This step is essential. Large particle titanium dioxide products produce a very white, opaque appearance on the skin when applied. Therefore, submicronizing the titanium dioxide powder is performed. The process of submicronization creates small particles that effectively create a larger surface area, better able to absorb visible light. This enables the resultant product to offer highly efficient sun protection that helps protect the skin from a great deal of both UVB and UVA radiation, while remaining invisible on the skin.

Transparent (sub-micronized) titanium dioxide works by absorbing, reflecting and scattering most UVB and some UVA rays. Additionally, protection against UV, visible and infrared is significantly limited when submicronized titanium dioxide is the primary protectant.

Zinc Oxide

Zinc Oxide has been known and used topically for centuries as a skin protectant and wound healing adjuvant. It has been recognized as a mild antimicrobial agent. More than 50 years ago, zinc oxide was used as a block for ultraviolet light (UVB/UVA). It also reflects infrared light from the skin, as does titanium dioxide. Its ability to protect in the long UVA range, (300—400 nm), however, is much higher than that of titanium dioxide. Zinc oxide absorbs, rather than scatters most UVA, while titanium dioxide primarily scatters these wavelengths. Thus, formulated in combination with titanium dioxide, ultrafine zinc oxide “closes the window” in the UVA range. Zinc oxide works to both complement titanium dioxide’s protection and to extend photoprotection to the skin where titanium dioxide is insufficient. The optimal particle size range for ultraviolet blocking zinc oxide (without blocking visible wavelengths) is approximately 80 to 150 nanometers. (1,000 nanometers = 1 micron)

Iron Oxides

We most commonly see iron oxide in two areas; as rust on exposed iron and in cosmetics, where it is employed to give the cover-up color desired. While not approved by the FDA as an active ingredient in sunscreens, many companies use iron oxides in their sunscreen products. Cosmetic iron oxides are man-made to very high levels of purity, desired color and particle size.

Iron oxide pigments for cosmetic use are micronized powders. By controlling the purity, particle size, temperature, and rate of drying during manufacture, they have become available in a number of shades and tones of red, yellow, black, and brown (and blends of these basic colors). These cosmetic pigments, if incorporated at adequate concentrations and when properly dispersed in well-designed vehicles, not only add color to the lotion (or cream, powder, etc.), but contribute significantly to protecting the skin from many wavelengths of light.

Ultra-submicronized iron oxides protect against visible light waves, yet add little color to the finished product. This allows for the addition of higher levels of infrared protecting iron oxide while retaining the cosmetic elegance and shade of the final preparation. Considerable blocking of ultraviolet rays is also reported with submicronized iron oxides, complementing further the primary UV blocking agents.

Indirect Physical Blocker Aids

Examples of these particles can be natural talc or mica. They are usually flat and oval in shape. They are very small particles, though they are much larger than direct physical blockers. A portion of very small physical blocker particles will coat the larger flat talc (mica, etc.). Being flat and smooth, the coated particles of talc easily slide over each other, overlapping themselves and effectively increasing protective coverage on the skin.

Polymers

Polymers can be natural substances from plants, modified semi-natural, animal derived substances (modified chitin, from the “shells” of shrimp etc. is commonly employed) or synthetic substances such as micronized nylon. Certain polymers, when carefully formulated into a photoprotective preparation, create a maze–like “cage” structure that forces the ultraviolet and visible rays (100nm–760nm) to go through a “maze” rather than reaching the skin directly. This longer route helps to protect the skin from these rays by preventing some rays from reaching the skin, by causing some rays to reach the skin after some of their energy has dissipated, and by increasing the contact time between the rays and the organic filters/physical blockers. By themselves, such polymers (which incidentally also improve the feel of the cosmetic finished product on the skin) do little to provide skin photo­protection. They help to defend the skin from wind and wind-blown dirt and grime pollution particles. However in the presence of active photoprotective agents, these polymers can increase the Sun Protection Factor (SPF) by three to five points.

CHEMICAL ABSORBERS/ORGANIC FILTERS

Chemical Sunscreens (also known as Organic Filters) are usually soluble in oils or water. These filter either/or UVB and UVA irradiation to varying degrees of efficiency. No organic filter completely blocks the UVB and/or UVA rays from the skin. Further, the actual protection offered by any and all sun-protective products relates directly to their level of concentration: the thickness of the film applied to the skin, as well as the careful, total coverage of the exposed skin sites.

The most common chemical absorbers used in sunscreens include:

Octyl Salicylate

Salicylates are the oldest class of sunscreens, with octyl salicylate the most widely used. While it is strictly a UVB absorber, and a weak one at that, it offers several positive qualities, including:

• Octyl salicylate is virtually nonirritating and nonsensitizing to skin.

• Cosmetically, octyl salicylate is an easy to handle emollient “oil” that acts as a good solvent (solubilizer) for other, solid organic sunscreens, such as the benzophenones.

Octyl Dimethyl PABA (Padimate O)

This oil-like UVB absorber is the most efficient for this ultraviolet range. It absorbs best at the maximum sunburn frequencies (310nm–312nm). It had been the most popular UVB sunscreen in the United States, but adverse reports (not necessarily proven) have reduced its use. Padimate-O is a PABA derivative, but quite distinct. Today’s purified material is essentially free of PABA.

Octyl Methoxycinnamate

Currently, this oily liquid is the most widely utilized organic UVB absorber used in the world. It is second in efficiency to Padimate-O, yet offers broad­er protection (300nm –315nm) in the sunburn region of UVB. It has a very good safety record and is relatively easy to formulate. Additionally, it is moisturizing and water insoluble, adhering tenaciously to the skin.

Menthyl Anthranilate

An old and safe, yet overall weak, absorber. Menthyl anthranilate absorbs moderately in the UVB range from about 300nm and somewhat more strongly into the UVA (up to about 340nm). It can somewhat enhance the UVB and lower (320nm to 340nm) UVA absorption of more active absorbers.

Oxybenzone (Benzophenone-3) and Sulisobenzone (Benzophenone-4)

These are closely related solid (powder) absorbers. Oxybenzone is water–insoluble, yet the acid form, sulisobenzone, can be made soluble in water when it is neutralized. While these compounds are classified as UVA absorbers they are also UVB absorbers. Overall, they offer only moderate protection through both the UVB range and part of the UVA (320nm – 360nm). They are quite stable and can enhance effectiveness of stronger UVB absorbers.

Avobenzone (Parsol®1789)

This solid (powder) absorber exhibits marginal UVB and lower (320nm – 330nm) UVA absorption. It provides good UVA absorption from about 330nm to 340nm and very good absorption in the UVA range up to about 370nm. At that level, it rapidly loses effectiveness. Because of its irritation potential, it is only permitted to be used in low concentration levels. Accordingly, this limits the actual level of protection obtainable. In addition, in the presence of sunlight, avobenzone can convert to its inactive form and readily loses more than one-third (1/3) of its active form rather quickly. Therefore, avobenzone (Parsol 1789) has useful, yet limited, UVA protection. Its usefulness can be enhanced by combining with UVB absorbers and physical protectors, such as zinc oxide.

Octocrylene

An emollient, water resistant UVB/UVA absorber. While octocrylene is a relatively weak sunscreen, it gives some protection in the UVB and lower (320to 350 nm) UVA range. Most importantly, octocrylene is a very stable absorber and both protects and augments other UV absorbers, and also improves their ability to provide a uniform coating of the skin.

The history of incorporating ultraviolet light filters into personal care products has grown enormously. This is due to both an increased awareness of the damaging effects of ultraviolet radiation on the skin, and a desire to build market presence based on a consumer driven demand.

Unfortunately, the traditional rating system utilizing SPF (sun protection factor) is not acceptable as a true measure of protection from the long-term effects of ultraviolet damage, since it fails to incorporate the damage as a result of the ultraviolet A wavelength. Currently, multiple FDA approved UVA active ingredients are marketed, and a new UVA chemical filter has recently received FDA approval, while others await the FDA’s evaluation. Yet it is not until a final FDA approved document exists that clarifies the complicated UVA rating system, that we will be able to truly determine a products level of UVA protection.

Dr. Harry Fallick has been involved in the clinical treatment of skin cancer for over twenty years. As a triple board certified surgeon, he developed a special interest in the treatment of photo damaged skin. Since founding Fallene, Ltd. in 1989, he has focused his attention on the development of ultra protective full spectrum sunscreens.



Read More
By | January 21, 2019

A common conundrum that takes many forms. Acne is a common skin condition that plagues a great majority of men and women. The term acne has been used to describe everything from the occurrence of mild centralized breakouts to severe inflammatory conditions that can affect the entire body. Although there is no shortage of publications on acne, there seems to be little information on what aestheticians can do to help alleviate this common skin condition. As the first line of defense against acne, aestheticians can suppress the visible signs of this condition with routine cleanings and treatments, and professional skin care products.

These treatments can benefit skin of all color and are the first step to alleviating this skin condition that may cause social and psychological impairment. The first section of this article describes how acne is formed, but stick with me; understanding acne is key to its relationship with diet and a persons well-being.

Understanding Acne

Before administering any type of treatment, it is important to first recognize the type of acne that is present on a client. The general categories for acne blemishes include blackheads, white heads, papules, pustules, nodules, and cysts. Most of these blemishes can present post-inflammatory hyperpigmentation or macules, and can be found on the face or body depending on the type of acne that is present. Acne vulgaris is the most wide spread form of acne that may be non-inflammatory or cystic and inflammatory. However, other strains of acne can develop over the skin and body: conglobata, fulminans, keloidalis nuchae, and acneiform eruptions. Although acne vulgaris is the most common, many of these other forms of acne are misdiagnosed and, in some cases, are not acne at all. Fungal and viral infections that are left untreated may present acne-like symptoms, and acne can develop from prescription drug use. When treating acne blemishes in general, take all aspects of the client into consideration. This is why client consultation and care is so important.

Acne cannot be “cured” by skin care professionals, only alleviated. Aestheticians can alleviate the signs of acne with chemical peels and professional skin care products designed to treat acne. Doctors can prescribe antibiotics, contraceptives, and topical prescription ointments to relieve the signs of acne. Currently, there is no known miracle drug that can remove acne from the skin. This prominent skin condition is caused by androgens – primarily testosterone that is naturally occurring in males and females. Once androgen receptors find their location on the sebaceous gland, acne begins to develop. There are essentially three main stages of acne blemishes: sebaceous hypersecretion, proliferation of keratinocytes, and inflammation.

Sebaceous hypersecretion: Characterized by an increase in sebum, sebaceous hypersecretion starts with androgen stimulation. Studies have found that sebum composition in acneic skin is deficient in linoleic acid and has high levels of squalene – a potentially comedogenic compound. This research finding opens the door to determining the probability that acne and diet may be related. In addition, these changes that are found in the sebum may relate to the formation and size of acne blemishes.

Proliferation of keratinocytes: This stage is marked by keratinocyte development that impedes the opening of the hair shaft and slows the movement of sebum to the skin surface. This process is the essential formation of the comedo.

Inflammation: Bacterial infection by Propionibacterium Acnes (P. Acnes) is the leading cause of inflammatory acne lesions. This bacterium activates the body’s immune system, which provokes inflammation. Redness and swelling are the result of an increase in blood flow and dilation of the capillaries. P. Acnes has been found, in turn, to produce its own antigens as a defense mechanism, thus resulting in an increased inflammatory response. Recent studies have found that keratinocytes contain their own defense mechanisms against P. Acnes. Once targeted, keratinocytes produce interleukin, antibiotic peptides (defensin), and metalloproteases that also participate in the inflammation response.

All three of these mechanisms play an important role in understanding the progression of acne and what results thereafter. Inflammation is essentially trauma that activates melanocytes to the area and induces post-inflammatory hyperpigmentation around acne lesions. The internal combat between the skin and P. Acnes affects the severity of acne lesions and relates to the scarring that can occur with deep cysts and nodules.

Diet and Acne

Proper nutrition is a key element in maintaining skin and body health and functioning. Fried foods, caffeine, candy, and chocolate do not cause acne – but can exasperate the problem. On the other hand, there is a positive association with milk and acne. A study published in the Journal of the American Academy of Dermatology found that milk and dairy products are linked to acne in teenagers and can increase acne by 22 to 44 percent (in skim milk, it doubles)! There have been two main causes for this increase in acne severity: hormones in lactating cows (not added) and iodine. Consuming less dairy products is beneficial for the skin, but should not be eliminated out of the diet. Simply drinking more orange juice and substituting soy will maintain needed calcium in the diet.

Another study published in the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition found that a low-glycemic-index diet reduced the amount of acne lesions and reduced inflammatory lesions by 45 percent. Scientists have found a direct correlation to hyperinsulinemia (high blood sugar) and an increased inflammatory response within the body. Lowering blood sugar levels not only assists with acne; participants in this study also experienced a reduction in weight and body mass index. The glycemic index (GI) diet is designed to either lower or raise blood sugar levels and is a valuable diet plan for diabetics. A low-GI diet consists of fruits, vegetables, legumes, and whole grains; whereas a high-GI diet contains more sugars, white flour, and rice. Maintaining a healthy balance toward the low-GI diet helps with weight loss and blood sugar levels, but that’s just the start. Think of all the rich antioxidants and essential nutrition the body can receive from a healthy balanced diet.

Emotional Impact

Acne has been commonly referred to as a condition that plagues pubescent adolescents. This is inherently true; however, there is an increasing amount of women who are developing acne between the ages of 25 and 35. The culprit is always the same: androgens. Ultimately, age does not matter when it comes to acne. As skin care professionals, aestheticians can help alleviate the signs, but also need to consider the clients mental health. Acne can be emotionally debilitating to both teens and adults, and can result in lowered self-esteem, embarrassment, social isolation, and interpersonal difficulties. When dealing with teen acne, the parent plays an important role in maintaining skin care regimens at home. If you have a teen client that may be suffering psychologically from acne, tell the parent. Social debilitation can prevent a child from participating in sports or other extracurricular activities. They may not look in mirrors or inversely be in the mirror picking at their face constantly. Ultimately, if acne goes untreated, the teen may feel as though they are “different” from normal society and have the potential to regress into destructive activities. Adults with acne are equally affected socially, but the context is different. Social inhibition and poor self-esteem can affect an individual’s employment or job performance and social life. As mentioned earlier, there are varying degrees of acne severity. The difficulty an individual may have socially because of his/her acne can – in most cases – be correlated to acne severity. Early signs of acne should not be ignored. Skin care treatments can alleviate the visible signs of acne and improve social interaction.

Effective Treatments

Skin care experts can effectively combat the visible signs of acne with advanced ingredients and skin care technology. Understanding the key ingredients and how to use them with technology to benefit the skin and prevent scarring takes education and practical knowledge. Aestheticians can visibly reduce the signs of acne with chemical peels and home care, but if a proper balance of exfoliation and moisture is not maintained, the skin can suffer from dehydration, hyperpigmentation, scarring, and premature aging. Circumstances in which a client suffers from cystic acne vulgaris or borders on a more severe form of acne as mentioned previously, a Dermatologists referral is recommended. In these circumstances, isotretinoin (Accutane®) or antibiotics is needed. Once a prescribed acne treatment has started, routine facial treatments and home care must be maintained with the aesthetician.

Chemical peels have been used for decades to rejuvenate the skin. When it comes to acne, effective treatments include salicylic acid, glycolic acid, modified Jessner solutions, microdermabrasion, and ultrasound. Chemical peels used in acne treatments should be light superficial peels that offer controlled exfoliation of the stratum corneum epidermal layer. Removing dead skin and debris that is found on this layer allows the pores to become supple, making extractions easier. Both glycolic and salicylic acids offer bactericidal properties to help destroy P. Acnes and thus reduce inflammation and the possibility of scarring.

Salicylic Acid: A lipid-soluble beta hydroxy acid, salicylic acid targets the sebaceous gland and dissolves excess oil while offering very superficial peeling. A reduction in sebum reduces acne blemishes, while superficial exfoliation removes dead skin and debris to make the pores supple and extractions easier. Clinical studies on Asian and African American skin have proven salicylic acid peels beneficial in acne treatments. On average a 20 or 30 percent salicylic acid with a pH of 2.0 to 3.0 is beneficial for both inflammatory and non-inflammatory acne blemishes.

Modified Jessner: This acid solution consists of a blend of salicylic acid, lactic acid, and resorcinol. In its full 14 percent strength, it is considered a light superficial to superficial peel. The modified solution is generally diluted to a seven percent Jessner that is left on the skin to target excess oil and acne blemishes.

Glycolic Acid: Regarded as a staple in the skin care industry, glycolic acid has been proven to offer many benefits to the skin. In the treatment of acne, this acid exfoliates superficial layers of the stratum corneum, makes the pores supple for extractions, and has bactericidal properties. Overall, it can help reduce inflammation, blemishes, and the occurrence of scarring.

Microdermabrasion and ultrasound are effective against acne by using different means. Corundum crystal is the key player in microdermabrasion. It is essentially blasted onto the skin surface and can become embedded in the skin. In addition to exfoliating the skin, corundum is a naturally drying and reduces sebum. Inversely, ultrasound uses wave vibrations on the skin surface. These vibrations, when combined with water, offer safe exfoliation for inflamed skin or acne rosacea, via the process of ablation. In addition, ultrasound vibrations can loosen impacted sebum and make the pores supple for a more easy method of extraction. Higher quality ultrasound machines will have the added benefit of heat and ultrasound. Most bacteria forms cannot survive in temperatures above 165°F (74°C). Heat offers many benefits for increased blood and lymphatic flow, and can significantly reduce the severity of cysts, papules, pustules, and closed comedones.

A more modern approach to acne treatments can be achieved with Phototherapy, Intense Pulsed Light, and Laser surgery. These methods can deliver dramatic results for acne blemishes, but provide temporary relief and are generally expensive when compared to ultrasound and microdermabrasion. Combining aesthetic technology with chemical peels can either benefit or aggravate the skin. Treatments should be designed to reduce the occurrence of acne blemishes while preventing inflammatory lesions and scarring.

Home Care Products

Without a strict home regimen to visibly reduce the signs of acne, skin care treatments are of no value. When treating acne at home, balance exfoliation with nutrition and moisture to prevent dehydration and premature aging. Cleansers and toners should be formulated to purify the skin by removing excess sebum, dirt, dead skin, and makeup. Key beneficial ingredients include witch hazel, hydroxy acids, and benzoyl peroxide. There is an existing safety concern when it comes to benzoyl peroxide. Simply use your best judgment when recommending products with this ingredient. Avoid high concentrations of ethanol, ethyl alcohol, isopropyl alcohol, methanol, and SD alcohol as these are drying agents and do not benefit the skin. On the other hand, cetyl alcohol, cetearyl alcohol, stearyl alcohol, and lanolin alcohol are not drying to the skin and benefit product consistency. When seeking an exfoliating serum for acne, follow the same general guidelines by looking for higher concentrations of witch hazel and hydroxy acids with little to no “bad” alcohols. Exfoliation for acne should always be in a serum form and never a scrub. Exfoliating scrubs can promote the spread of infection over other areas of the face and aggravate inflammation.

Moisturizers and skin nutrition is vital to any home care regimen – especially acne. Infection, inflammation, and a drop in linoleic acid levels foster a prevalence of free radicals within the skin. In addition, salicylic acid and benzoyl peroxide dry excess sebum on the skin resulting in a drop in natural moisture levels and the increased risk of dehydration. Topical L-ascorbic acid, alpha lipoic acid, spin trap, and many natural plant extracts offer antioxidant protection for the skin. A standard vitamin C serum and most anti-inflammatory serums are rich in antioxidants and help prevent damage to the cells. Individuals who suffer from acne have oily skin and, in most cases, do not like the feel or weight of most moisturizers. During the summer, the client should use a lightweight lotion as a moisturizer that contains natural plant extracts. Calendula, chamomile, and tea tree are natural ingredients that have antibacterial properties; licorice root and amaranth seed are natural anti-inflammatory ingredients. During the winter months, the air is drier due to climate change and indoor heating units, and the skin suffers from dehydration. Hyaluronic acid and essential fatty acids are necessary to hydrate the skin and foster retention. These too can be combined with natural plant extracts to offer additional antioxidant protection, prevent the spread of bacteria, and reduce redness and inflammation.

Modern science and technology has provided great relief to individuals who suffer from acne. Unfortunately, there is no cure – only suppression. It was not long ago when microdermabrasion and ultrasound treatments brought significant change compared to standard chemical peels. Our rapid technology development has brought about lasers and phototherapy to nearly treat the condition – temporarily. Believe it or not, scientists are theorizing on DNA sequencing to remove the hereditary link that causes acne! Until then, we know about many physiological aspects of acne development, diet, self-perception and esteem changes, and (more importantly) awareness. Treat the signs of acne early on with ingredients we know that work. 



Read More
By | January 21, 2019

The advent of medical spas has brought forth new issues related to risk management and insurance in general. The usual suspects include property and liability coverage, with the added wrinkle of professional liability or “malpractice” coverage. Further, no two medical spas seem to be quite the same—as such, each spa will need a customized insurance program to ensure that all exposures have been properly covered.
Insuring your new medical spa shouldn’t create a major headache, but there are a number of critical factors to consider. Let’s build an insurance program from the ground up.

Property Coverage
You’ve made a considerable investment into equipment, furnishings, supplies, and likely “improvements and betterments”.1 Improvements and betterments, or sometimes called “build outs”, include the pre-opening construction items like partition walls for treatment rooms, floor and wall coverings, permanently installed equipment and fixtures that weren’t already there (like sinks and counters in treatment rooms). Everything is perfect…. Now what?
Property insurance coverage will include your “business personal property” (that’s insurance speak for everything listed above) and your building (if you’re the owner). Coverage varies from policy to policy but will ordinarily insure against all perils except those that are specifically not covered.2 These are the policy “exclusions” and should be carefully reviewed with your insurance agent before you purchase the policy. Many property insurance policies also include a host of coverage enhancements such as coverage for theft of money, back-up of sewers and drains, glass and signs, and business interruption coverage. Business interruption insurance protects against loss of business income resulting from a covered loss at your location such as fire. Coverage normally includes ongoing expenses, payroll, and loss of net income.
When purchasing property insurance, opt for “special form” coverage (side bar). The policy should also provide coverage on a “replacement cost” basis. Replacement cost policies pay claims based on the actual cost to replace the damaged or destroyed property without deducting depreciation.

General Liability Coverage
General liability coverage is often sold as a package policy with property coverage. Whether sold as a package or a stand-alone policy, the coverage is the same. General liability coverage protects against lawsuits arising out of the operation of your business. Policies normally include trip and fall accidents, product liability, allegations that your business has committed libel, slander, and trademark infringement,3 and fire legal liability. Fire (or tenant’s) legal liability coverage protects you against lawsuits arising out of damage caused by your business to the premises rented to you. For example, this would cover damage to building from a fire caused by unattended candles in the spa. General liability policies normally exclude intentional acts (like assaulting a customer), professional liability (malpractice), and workers’ compensation. As with property insurance, the policy exclusions impact coverage tremendously and should be reviewed with your insurance agent.

Commercial Automobile Coverage
If your business owns any vehicles, a commercial automobile policy would be appropriate. The coverage is nearly the same as your regular personal automobile policy. You should remember however, that even businesses that don’t own any vehicles may still have some exposure to an automobile liability claim. Any time you rent or borrow a vehicle for business use, or send an employee on a business errand in your own vehicle, there is a chance that an accident could occur. If the accident happens on company business, your spa could be held liable for the resulting injuries and/or property damage. Businesses without any owned vehicles should give consideration to the purchase of hired and non-owned automobile liability coverage. In some cases, coverage is also available to insure damage to rented vehicles. Hired and non-owned automobile liability coverage is generally inexpensive and is often an optional coverage on a general liability policy.

Professional Liability Coverage
Professional liability or “malpractice” coverage4 is possibly the most important, least understood, and may likely be the most expensive component of your insurance program. Simply put, professional liability coverage insures against injuries caused by your performing or failure to perform your professional services. Injuries could include burns from a laser or chemical peel, allergic reactions to skin preparations, muscle injuries from a massage, or an infection at an injection site (etc.). The list of potential causes of a professional liability claim is endless.
Where property and general liability policy coverage is fairly standardized, professional liability policies vary greatly by the way of coverage and price. It is critical that your insurance agent have a clear understanding of your business and the proposed insurance policy—if either is incomplete, there could be major problems waiting just around the corner. There are a relative few insurance agencies that truly specialize in coverage for medical spas. For better or worse, the explosive growth in spa industry has attracted a large number of inexperienced insurance agents. Be sure that you’re selecting a professional with a broad knowledge of your industry and of the proposed insurance policies.
There are a few critical factors to consider when navigating the purchase of your professional liability coverage. These factors include who is covered, what services are covered, cost of defense, coverage form, and quality of insurer.
The malpractice coverage carried by many doctors provides coverage only for the doctor and/or the doctor and their staff. In order to be fully covered, you’ll need a policy that covers service rendered by you and your staff as well as your business (corporation, LLC, etc.). Protecting yourself against claims is important, but it won’t be of much help if your business is bankrupted by an uninsured lawsuit. Also, understand that independent contractors may not be covered under your policy. If so, they should provide you with evidence of their own insurance coverage. Evidence of coverage is ideally in the form of a “certificate of insurance” that includes your name and address as “certificate holder”. As “certificate holder”, the insurance company will notify you if the policy is cancelled during the year. For better protection, I recommend that policies covering independent contractors should name the spa as an “additional insured”. “Additional insured” status is the same as “certificate holder” with one major benefit: if the spa is sued as a result of services rendered by an independent contractor, the “additional insured” spa would be covered under the independent contractor’s policy. Many policies for aestheticians, massage therapists, and non-medical laser technicians will cover “additional insureds” at little or no cost. Nearly all policies for medical doctors and nurses will refuse to add any “additional insureds”. As such, it is important to understand that inviting doctors (and sometimes nurses) to work at your spa as independent contractors will expose your spa to an uninsured claim.
After you’ve worked out who will be covered under your professional liability policy, it’s time to sort out what services are insured. As I mentioned earlier, each insurance company has their own particular method of describing what’s covered and what’s not. Some policies will insure specifically listed services, while others include coverage for broad categories of services. When applying for professional liability coverage, be sure that your insurance application is as complete as possible. Make certain that the insurance carrier has seen your entire menu of services. Whether your policy provides coverage for specific services or broad categories of services, it is recommended that you advise your insurance agent of any new services added during the course of the year. Sure the new injectable filler works great, but is it covered?
When everything is said and done, professional liability policies are there to defend against lawsuits. The cost of your defense can sometimes exceed the settlement awarded. There are two primary methods in which insurance policies deal with coverage for the cost of your defense. We call them “defense outside limits” and “defense inside limits”. If a choice is available, you’ll want to select the former rather than the latter. A $1,000,000 policy with defense “outside limits” will pay up to $1,000,000 to the injured person and 100 percent of the cost of your defense. The same policy written with defense “inside limits” will deduct the cost of defense from your policy limit before paying your claim. Defense costs for a major malpractice claim could easily reach $100,000. If the claimant is awarded a $1,000,000 payment, you’ll be left to make up the difference. I recognize that not every claim will result in a $1,000,000 award. I also recognize that many professionals carry substantially less that $1,000,000 coverage. The lower your coverage limit, the more this distinction could impact you.
Professional liability policies are written on one of two basic coverage forms. The first is called “occurrence form”. The second is called a “claims made” form. Coverage under occurrence form policies is triggered by the date the injury occurred—if the injury occurred while coverage was in force, the coverage applies. Coverage under claims made form policies is triggered by the date the claim is made—coverage applies only if coverage is still in force when the claim is reported to the insurance company. If you must carry a claims made form professional liability policy, be sure that you understand the implications and cost of “tail coverage”. Tail coverage5 extends the amount of time allowed to report claims beyond the policy expiration date in one year increments. The cost and availability of tail coverage varies tremendously between different insurance companies. It’s a good idea to review the costs of tail coverage prior to purchasing any claims made form professional liability policy.

Workers’ Compensation and Employer’s Liability6
Workers’ compensation insurance covers your employees for medical bills and lost wages resulting from on the job injury or disease. All states require businesses with employees to carry workers’ compensation coverage in some form. In most states, business owners choose whether or not to cover themselves. Coverage and reimbursement rates for medical bills and lost wages are separately set by each state.
The employer’s liability section of coverage protects your business against third party lawsuits arising out of workplace injury. Thanks to the presence of workers’ compensation law, injured employees are generally unable to sue their employer for on the job injuries. However, spouses of injured employees and/or those whom rely on the injured employee for support or care can sue.
The actual coverage provided under a workers’ compensation and employer’s liability policy is the same, regardless of insurance carrier. These policies vary only in price. Premiums are based on a percentage of estimated annual wages for the business and include a variety of state taxes and fees. At the end of each policy period, the insurance company conducts a payroll audit and adjusts the prior year’s premium upward or downward accordingly.

Employment Practices Liability
Employment practices liability insurance (“EPLI”) protects against lawsuits alleging wrongful termination, sexual
harassment, hostile work environment, and the like. We are seeing an increase in this type of legal action and expect the trend to continue. While EPLI can be expensive, even a groundless suit can cost in excess of $25,000 to defend. All businesses with employees should consider EPLI coverage.

Umbrella or Excess Liability7
The previously mentioned liability policies are called primary or underlying policies. These policies provide your first layer of defense against lawsuits. Umbrella or excess liability policies provide additional layers of coverage in $1,000,000 increments. We’ve all heard the old saying that you “can never be too thin or too rich”. I’d like to add that you “can never have too much liability insurance”. Umbrella policies are generally less expensive than the underlying policies, and are a cost effective method of protecting your business assets against underinsured lawsuits.

Risk Management
An effective combination of insurance policies is only one component of your risk management program. In addition to insurance coverage, you will need to consider a variety of loss control measures including effective safeguarding of property (such as quality locks, alarms, and sprinkler systems), careful patient intake procedures (including appropriate consent/release, medical history forms, and post-treatment instruction forms), and human resources procedures (employment handbooks, performance reviews, etc.). By eliminating hazards before a claim occurs, you will be able to control your insurance costs, as well as your exposure to loss.

Consider your insurance agent a partner in the success of your business. Choose a professional whom you trust, and whom also understands your business as well as their own.

(Endnotes)
1 If you own your building, “improvements and betterments” should be included in the value of the building for insurance purposes.
2 This is called “special form” coverage, and is the preferred type of property insurance. Alternatively, “named peril” coverage insures only against those perils specifically listed in the policy.
3 Your insurance agent will call these allegations “personal and advertising injury”.
4 While coverage for doctors and nurses is most commonly called “malpractice”, the terms “professional liability”, “malpractice”, and “errors and omissions” all refer to the same type of coverage.
5 Tail coverage is sometimes referred to as an “extended reporting period”.
6 Certain states (N.D., Ohio, Wash., and Wyo.) treat workers’ compensation and employer’s liability coverage differently. Consult your insurance agent.
7 There are slight differences in “umbrella” and “excess” liability not pertinent to our discussion. Consult your insurance agent.

R. Charles Stevens II CISR manages the specialty programs division at Marine Agency Corporation in Maplewood, N.J. Stevens has specialized in the insuring the beauty industry for over 12 years, and is a recipient of the Certified Insurance Service Representative designation. Marine Agency Corporation provides customized policies in all 50 states for medical and anti-aging spas, cosmetic laser and IPL clinics, day spas and salons, massage therapists, aestheticians, electrologists, micropigmentation technicians, tattoo/body piercing studios, and compounding pharmacies. Stevens is available to answer questions by e-mail at cstevens@marineagency.com.



Read More
By | January 21, 2019

The word holistic is defined as emphasizing the importance of the whole and the interdependence of its parts. When applying the term holistic to skin care, it defines skin that is healthy, glowing … beautiful. Holistic approaches to skin care consider the health of the whole person, internally and externally – meaning nutrition, lifestyle and emotional factors.
According to the Bureau of Labor Statistics, there is an increasing interest in skin treatments that promote relaxation and well-being. As a result the employment of aestheticians that can provide these types of treatments are predicted to grow by an impressive 38 percent over the 2008 to 2018 period. So, it should not come as a shock that including holistic treatments on spa treatment menus has become customary, whether as a full-service menu item or as an add-on treatment.

In an effort to provide our readers with the means to improve themselves and their business we have included several different holistic treatments below with the hope that it will inspire new thoughts and ideas on how to update or revitalize your service menu.

Shirodhara Treatment
$122 for 75 Minutes

An incredible experience, this ancient remedy uses traditional oils from India to induce deep relaxation and a peaceful state of mind. First a head-to-toe energy balancing helps to calm and center your client. Next the Ayurvedic Rejuvenating Face Massage lifts tension with its hypnotic marma point massage techniques. Finally, let your client's spirit soar as warm sesame oil flows gently over their forehead and scalp, transporting them to a peaceful space. Please allow 30 minutes after their treatment to gently awaken.
Spa on the Avenue
White Marsh, Md.
www.spaontheavenue.com

Balancing Ayurvedic Massage
$190 for 60 minutes

This inspiration from India literally translates as "life knowledge." A pre-treatment consultation will identify your client's specific DOSHA, based upon their emotional and physical makeup. Traditional massage techniques, combined with specific oils, create a armonious relationship among the three Doshas – Pitta (Fire), Vata (Air) and Kapha (Earth & Water) – promoting a sense of wellbeing through holistic therapy.
The Spa at Trump
New York, New York
www.trumpsohohotel.com

East Meets West Lastone
60 minutes for $179 or 90 minutes for $269

Earth, air, fire and water are united to create this eastern-based, holistic Ayurvedic treatment. The Ayurvedic oils, including a blend of cinnamon, sage, rosemary, basil and rose, are combined with massage techniques to create a unique experience to melt away stress.
Willow Stream Spa at the Fairmont Scottsdale Princess
Scottsdale, Ariz.
www.willowstream.com/scottsdale

Ayurvedic Herbal Exfoliation (Udvartan)
50 minutes for $95

Combination of dry herbs or herbal pastes (Ubtan), salts, flowers, greens, whole grains are rubbed into the skin. Apart from cleansing and nourishing the skin, this process tones the muscles and reduces fat by improving the metabolism of the muscles and adipose tissues. It leaves the skin tingling, soothed and soft.
FineLiving New York Ayurveda
New York, New York
www.newyorkayurveda.com

Four Directions
$165 for 75 minutes

This Native American inspired ritual allows your clients to embraces the four cardinal directions of the Medicine Wheel with sacred herbs, plants, stones and animal spirits. This treatment includes a full-body corn-meal tobacco exfoliation and a sweetgrass
herbal wrap.
Red Mountain Resort
Ivins, Utah
www.redmountainresort.com

Srota Clearing Therapy (shro-ta)
$205 for 65 minutes

Srotas are the meridians or pathways through which the body carries nutrients, information and intelligence. With direct and pressured strokes, the customized Srota clearing treatment opens your client's circulatory system and their subtle energy channels to soothe and relax tight tissues. Designed to meet their client's desired level of pressure and areas of focus, the Srota is most similar to a Swedish massage.
The Chopra Center for Wellbeing
Carlsbad, Calif.
www.chopra.com

Udvartan - Ayurvedic Herbal Body-Scrub Massage
$95 for 60 minutes

Finely ground Ayurvedic herbs and exotic sandalwood powder are mixed with precious Ayurvedic oils and gently massaged into the skin. This results in the stimulation of the energy flow in the body, the detoxification and nourishment of body tissues, the activation of the skin's natural metabolism and also the improvement of lymph flow. The Udvartana massage cleanses and refines the skin structure and gives the skin a soft, silky texture and a lustrous glow.
Pranaa Ayurveda Spa
Plano, Texas
www.pranaa.com

Lotus Flower Aquatic Reflexology
$150 for 60 minutes

As the client is floating with supports under their knees and neck, the therapist works the reflex points of their hands, feet and ears to release blockages along the energy meridians, stimulating their immune system and bringing relaxation. This deeply relaxing treatment leaves you feeling energized and invigorated.
Sanctuary on Camelback Mountain
Scottsdale, Ariz.
www.sanctuaryoncamelback.com

The word holistic is defined as emphasizing the importance of the whole and the interdependence of its parts. When applying the term holistic to skin care, it defines skin that is healthy, glowing … beautiful. Holistic approaches to skin care consider the health of the whole person, internally and externally – meaning nutrition, lifestyle and emotional factors.
According to the Bureau of Labor Statistics, there is an increasing interest in skin treatments that promote relaxation and well-being. As a result the employment of aestheticians that can provide these types of treatments are predicted to grow by an impressive 38 percent over the 2008 to 2018 period. So, it should not come as a shock that including holistic treatments on spa treatment menus has become customary, whether as a full-service menu item or as an add-on treatment. 
In an effort to provide our readers with the means to improve themselves and their business we have included several different holistic treatments below with the hope that it will inspire new thoughts and ideas on how to update or revitalize your service menu.

Shirodhara Treatment
$122 for 75 Minutes

An incredible experience, this ancient remedy uses traditional oils from India to induce deep relaxation and a peaceful state of mind. First a head-to-toe energy balancing helps to calm and center your client. Next the Ayurvedic Rejuvenating Face Massage lifts tension with its hypnotic marma point massage techniques. Finally, let your client's spirit soar as warm sesame oil flows gently over their forehead and scalp, transporting them to a peaceful space. Please allow 30 minutes after their treatment to gently awaken.
Spa on the Avenue
White Marsh, Md.
www.spaontheavenue.com

Balancing Ayurvedic Massage
$190 for 60 minutes

This inspiration from India literally translates as "life knowledge." A pre-treatment consultation will identify your client's specific DOSHA, based upon their emotional and physical makeup. Traditional massage techniques, combined with specific oils, create a armonious relationship among the three Doshas – Pitta (Fire), Vata (Air) and Kapha (Earth & Water) – promoting a sense of wellbeing through holistic therapy.
The Spa at Trump
New York, New York
www.trumpsohohotel.com

East Meets West Lastone
60 minutes for $179 or 90 minutes for $269

Earth, air, fire and water are united to create this eastern-based, holistic Ayurvedic treatment. The Ayurvedic oils, including a blend of cinnamon, sage, rosemary, basil and rose, are combined with massage techniques to create a unique experience to melt away stress.
Willow Stream Spa at the Fairmont Scottsdale Princess
Scottsdale, Ariz.
www.willowstream.com/scottsdale

Ayurvedic Herbal Exfoliation (Udvartan)
50 minutes for $95

Combination of dry herbs or herbal pastes (Ubtan), salts, flowers, greens, whole grains are rubbed into the skin. Apart from cleansing and nourishing the skin, this process tones the muscles and reduces fat by improving the metabolism of the muscles and adipose tissues. It leaves the skin tingling, soothed and soft.
FineLiving New York Ayurveda
New York, New York
www.newyorkayurveda.com

Four Directions
$165 for 75 minutes

This Native American inspired ritual allows your clients to embraces the four cardinal directions of the Medicine Wheel with sacred herbs, plants, stones and animal spirits. This treatment includes a full-body corn-meal tobacco exfoliation and a sweetgrass
herbal wrap.
Red Mountain Resort
Ivins, Utah
www.redmountainresort.com

Srota Clearing Therapy (shro-ta)
$205 for 65 minutes

Srotas are the meridians or pathways through which the body carries nutrients, information and intelligence. With direct and pressured strokes, the customized Srota clearing treatment opens your client's circulatory system and their subtle energy channels to soothe and relax tight tissues. Designed to meet their client's desired level of pressure and areas of focus, the Srota is most similar to a Swedish massage.
The Chopra Center for Wellbeing
Carlsbad, Calif.
www.chopra.com

Udvartan - Ayurvedic Herbal Body-Scrub Massage
$95 for 60 minutes

Finely ground Ayurvedic herbs and exotic sandalwood powder are mixed with precious Ayurvedic oils and gently massaged into the skin. This results in the stimulation of the energy flow in the body, the detoxification and nourishment of body tissues, the activation of the skin's natural metabolism and also the improvement of lymph flow. The Udvartana massage cleanses and refines the skin structure and gives the skin a soft, silky texture and a lustrous glow.
Pranaa Ayurveda Spa
Plano, Texas
www.pranaa.com

Lotus Flower Aquatic Reflexology
$150 for 60 minutes

As the client is floating with supports under their knees and neck, the therapist works the reflex points of their hands, feet and ears to release blockages along the energy meridians, stimulating their immune system and bringing relaxation. This deeply relaxing treatment leaves you feeling energized and invigorated.

Sanctuary on Camelback Mountain
Scottsdale, Ariz.
www.sanctuaryoncamelback.com

 



Read More
By Jeremy Lawrence | January 21, 2019

Kris Campbell, L.E., C.O.E., is brand manager and national educator of Tecniche® LLC, a skin care line dedicated to those with very sensitive skin caused by persistent health issues like cancer and diabetes or periodic issues like cosmetic irritation. Campbell trains on awareness and ingredients, writes for trade publications, and speaks at trade events about the many conditions that arise with the aesthetic management of health – challenged skin, including oncology implications. Having previously worked for a Food and Drug Administration (FDA) cosmeceutical manufacturer, Campbell also conceptualizes product development for Tecniche.

logoWhat has surprised you most during your professional journey?
“I am most amazed that while the industry is large in nature, it is also a close knit community. While there are many competing companies, there is a lot of mutual respect and communication between key people.”

I have been in the professional skin care industry for 11 years. I find inspiration in listening to other educators and experts in the field. I am always reading anything regarding skin care and health challenges. I do not limit myself to industry knowledge and I incorporate the consumer avenue to see what they are talking about. I learned the most when working at the FDA laboratory. Working with clients to help formulate product lines and the knowledge of ingredients has really helped me in my current position. Ingredients are always changing in regard to new discoveries on ways to improve skin, as well as new methods of ingredient delivery. With the wellness trend still thriving, I see a need for more customized services and products to treat individuals that have skin or fragrance sensitivities due to a variety of internal/external sources. Ingredients are an important aspect with every consideration in this industry. Even with intake forms, clients should be aware of the ingredients they are using and the aesthetician should be aware of any contraindications the client may have. Many ingredients are contraindicated due to medications, menstrual cycles, allergies, current homecare regimens, and even previous surgeries where lymph nodes were removed. The best spas have a great intake form as to really understand a client’s concerns and possible issues that could cause reactions in treatment room. The spa staff should also be knowledgeable in the right treatments and homecare for their clients. The spa management team should be willing to listen to the needs and concerns of their staff and clients, and be able to adapt to upcoming trends in the industry as it is always changing. I tell every client to listen to what their bodies and skin are telling them. I also advise them to let their skin care professional know of allergies, medications, and past surgeries so the best treatment plan can be developed to treat their skin concerns with no adverse reactions.



Read More
By | January 21, 2019

by Denise R. Fuller

Bosses! Just saying the word can send chills up one’s spine. Our direct supervisor is the one person who can be the biggest ally in our career or make our lives miserable. When it comes to employment, there will always be someone there who is the boss!

The Cheerleader

Some bosses are always nice and happy with a peppy, cheerleader-type attitude. They don’t like confrontation. If someone takes a problem to them, they tend to listen, nod their heads and say “yeah, yeah”, but nothing gets done. Similarly, they will avoid correcting an employee who is clearly in the wrong. The less motivated workers are content because no one ever questions them. The better ones are unhappy, because nothing gets done.

This kind of boss flourishes in well-established and large organizations or monopolies where concerns about individual performance are secondary. Their job is focused more on public relations. However, once an organization goes through a financial crisis, then this weakness becomes evident. How long can a business survive with under-performing employees?

Eventually, people begin to realize that the nice, pleasant, and non-confrontational boss is a liability. While everyone likes having the cheerleader around, the lack of leadership and guidance leads to serious problems. If this boss needs to be saved, sometimes management classes can help turn things around.

The Wicked Witch

The Wicked Witch bosses are bullies who are used to whipping people into shape to get what they want. They rarely ask for opinions, as it is not necessary. They rule with absolute power and expect compliance. They tend to exercise power in a harsh, cruel manner; they don’t seem to care about their staff. The main goal for them is to get the job done at any cost. Employees may often hear “so-and-so is lucky that I don’t fire him/her”.

This kind of boss will flourish in militaristic cultures where orders are never supposed to be questioned. They prefer new graduates who have little experience in the industry. They seem to enjoy taking advantage and abusing those who are in their first job experience, are particularly harsh with workers who are afraid of losing their jobs, and believe they have nowhere else to go.

Usually these Wicked Witches are unaware of how they affect the work environment and are clueless as to why their staff leaves in droves. They are experts in denial and will easily find other reasons to explain why things go wrong. They do not see how their attitude may have contributed to the problem.

The Bully

This may be a boss. However, frequently this person acts with authority but has no official title; this person may even not be in management. The bully typically is one of the ‘originals’ and feels part of a clique with special privileges; or may curry special favors with the owner. If they decide they don’t like you, life at work can become quite miserable. Bullying at work is a problem that is only just beginning to be seen as one of the main causes of workplace stress. Bullying is a form of psychological or physical harassment and women and men at all levels of employment can be affected by it. The bully can be a manager, a supervisor, or a co-worker.

A bully is a person who uses strength or power to intimidate others by fear. Workplace bullying exists in various forms. It involves behavior that intimidates, degrades, or humiliates an employee (sometimes in front of other people).

Covert Acts Include:

  • repeated refusal of ongoing education or training
  • if they do attend, they make snide and negative comments during the training
  • withholding important information needed to complete a job
  • continual allocation of low grade or inappropriate work

The Effects Of Bullying

No one works at their best if they feel hurt, angry, vulnerable, and powerless. Bullying can have a variety of physical and psychological effects on people. Commonly reported effects are:

· Stress, anxiety, and tension

· Feelings of social isolation at work

· Loss of confidence and self-esteem

· Loss or deterioration of personal relationships

· Headaches, backaches, stomach cramps, depression

· Deterioration of work performance

The effects of bullying can also be psychological and financial and include:

· Stress-related illnesses and headaches

· Anxiety, depression, self-blame

· Stomach disorders, skin rashes

· Disempowerment

· Lethargy and sleep disturbance

· Anger, irritability

· Loss of concentration

· Loss of self-esteem, lowered self-confidence

· Panic attacks

· Reluctance to go to work

· Uncertainty of self

· Actively seeking other positions

· Post-traumatic stress disorder

Bullying at the workplace is an unacceptable behavior and should not be tolerated. As a first step, there are a few tactics worth trying. First, you must feel strong enough about it to want to respond; second, your reaction must be appropriate to the situation. Stand firm if you come under verbal attack. Tell the bully you will not put up with being spoken to in that way. Remain confident in your own judgment and ability. Avoid being alone with the bully.

If you do not feel up to this, contact the Human Resource Director or Supervisor and start documenting what this person is doing to you. In smaller salons, there is no HR department and the owners may have a high opinion of this person. Sometimes, you will have no other choice than to look elsewhere for employment. No one should have to work under this type of stress, especially when you are working in a healing industry.

Good Cop/Bad Cop

You are excited about working at this spa as it is so beautiful and you have met with the owners. The purpose of the meeting is always seen as a chance for them to evaluate you. But, don’t forget that you should also be evaluating them, since they will be your boss. During the interview, owner number one was sweet and kind and very seasoned; but the other owner, who was introduced as a silent partner…, well he/she was OK. From what you could tell, partner number two was not there very often, so you weren’t too concerned about their specific questions. As time goes on, you start to see that this team operates using the traditional good cop/bad cop routine. Partnership bosses who use this routine can be tricky even for the best teams. Partnerships can come in the form of a husband and wife duo, sisters, or long time friend. The main difficulty in working with teams as a boss is that they seem to feel that they must always win, no matter who is right. One may seek your allegiance, only to be pounced on by the other. One aesthetician thought she was working in the twilight zone as she felt she could never make the owners happy. These owners were what she called amoral. They would change the rules to fit their own gain and would be very condescending. The staff felt that with these types of bosses they never knew who they could go to; they didn’t know who to trust.

Is There a Good Boss?

The good news is that there are many good bosses - even great bosses! Just like Goldilocks in the story of the Three Bears and her finding just the right chair and porridge, an aesthetician may have to look around for a while in order to find the perfect fit. The reality is that there are some people you just aren’t going to like or get along with no matter how hard you try. When you do find a great spa and a great boss, work becomes a joy.

Peggy Wynne Borgman, spa director and president of Wynne Business, will ask all job applicants during the interview, “If you could design the perfect boss, what attributes would that person have?"

The number one response is that employees want to work for someone with personal integrity. The second most-mentioned quality is the ability to listen. The third seems to be the willingness to tell employees how they're doing, and to clearly articulate what's expected of them.

In the book, "First, Break All the Rules," author Malcolm Gladwell cites years of Gallup studies of great managers that show one particular behavior in common. They ask their subordinates, "How can I help you?" on a regular basis. Peggy Wynne Borgman recommends reading Gladwell’s book and learning the Gallup – the famous 12 questions that best indicate employee satisfaction – as a framework for understanding your priorities as a boss. The Gallup (www.gallup.com) is an organization that has studied human nature and behavior for more than 70 years.

 

A great employer will treat each employee fairly, not only in terms of salary and other forms of compensation, but also in how that employee is involved in the daily function of the business. Encourage feedback, innovation, and creativity so employees feel genuinely engaged. The boss needs to create an environment of integrity, trust, and respect to make absolutely certain that everyone is treated fairly.

Don't Just Lead - Coach.

It is common to hear a sports reporter observe that one coach out-coached another in a particular game. A great boss will see himself/herself as a leader and a coach who teaches, encourages and, if need be, corrects employees. It is important to use a different perspective to educate and encourage. But it is also important, like a good coach, to lead your team by example. For instance, while you should point out mistakes by your employees, you must be sure to admit when you yourself make a mistake.

A true leader accepts responsibility. Stand by your decisions and your leadership will be solidified. If you are wrong then admit it and move on. Being wrong is not a death sentence in a business sense, but not admitting it may be. A good leader accepts fault and shares credit.

Leaders are not always born; some are made. Being a good boss is recognizing that much of what goes into being an effective leader is, in fact, learned. To become an effective boss, one should attend a management seminar and read books on effective leadership. It is important to realize that a good employer naturally attracts top notch employees. Bosses can develop good leadership capabilities. We all have the traits that make us good bosses and leaders. All you really have to do is take the time and make the effort to develop those traits and become the boss!

Denise R. Fuller is a Licensed Aesthetician and Beauty Therapist Consultant, educator, and author for the aesthetic industry. Fuller is also the CEO of International Spa Importing Specialists. For more information, please contact her at 888-566-4747.



Read More
By Linda Gulla | January 21, 2019

When young aestheticians start out in their new journey, the opportunities are endless as to the direction of their career. At first, newly licensed aestheticians are eager to begin their careers and experience the fulfillment of her learning. As their careers progress over time, these aestheticians will discover what they love most about their field and may choose to pursue extensive schooling in one aspect of the field. When deciding to change career direction, these aestheticians have various avenues that can be chosen.

Aestheticians may choose to specialize in a specific area such as hair removal or spa services like body wraps or hydrotherapy. Most aestheticians enjoy the cosmetic field and may choose to specialize in makeup artistry. With makeup artistry, there are numerous avenues for the aesthetician to specialize in, such as permanent makeup or makeup for film and photography. Pursuing a career as a makeup artist will require additional training that will broaden the range of career opportunities, as well as offer the ability to work as a freelance makeup artist.

Continuing Education
There is a difference between advanced education and continuing education. In many states, a minimum number of hours of continuing education is required each year in order to maintain licensure. The aesthetician can choose from various areas of interest, which will enhance their knowledge within the workplace. Most continuing education courses are not accredited. They are offered by other professionals pursuing their own business in education. With continuing education, each professional should inquire at the state licensing level that the continuing education program is recognized by the state in which licensure is registered. The purpose of continuing education is to ensure licensure and enhance knowledge within a specific area of interest. Some continuing education courses do offer a certificate of achievement, which can be included in a career portfolio.

Advanced Education
Advanced education classes are designed for professionals who wish to pursue a higher standard of learning in a specific area of interest. Advanced education courses are available at many levels and may include many different areas of study. Advanced studies give the aesthetician the opportunity to pursue areas of interest, and in most cases, receive a certificate of achievement in that specific area of expertise. Advanced education will evidence that the professional wishes for career advancement and will make the professional more desirable to employers when compared to others who have not chosen advanced education. Not only will acquiring numerous training certificates enable these aestheticians to advance careerwise in the direction of choice, it allows them to be recognized as specialists in particular areas of study. With advanced education, aestheticians will escalate up the career ladder, as well as add credibility as a licensed professional. The aesthetician should know that some advanced education programs are accredited, but it is not required, nor is it a necessity, for recognition or job placement within the industry.
Most advanced education programs are offered by other licensed professionals who wish to pursue their own business in education. With advanced training programs, aestheticians should know the credentials and level of expertise of the professional who is offering the program, and they should ensure that the program offers the most up to date technology and information available. To ensure the highest level of credibility, advanced training educators should know, clarify, and state the practicing laws regarding the area of study and the most current scope of practice. It is the responsibility of the aesthetician to know state licensing laws and to practice within the current scope of licensure. Since state licensing laws are constantly changing, the aesthetician should keep current and updated on state licensing laws.

Advanced Clinical Aesthetic Programs
A clinical aesthetic program and certification is for aestheticians who wish to gain knowledge of advanced clinical skin care treatments. Clinical aesthetic programs offer studies in corrective skin care procedures that can be utilized in a skin care clinic or medical spa. Most clinical aesthetic programs offer a certificate of training, which can open new doors of opportunities to the aesthetician. Certificates of training on various topics will give the aesthetician an edge to furthering her knowledge and career. He or she will be in more demand within the job market.

Paramedical Aesthetic Programs
A paramedical aesthetic program is designed exclusively for aestheticians who wish to enter the medical field. This can include other medical practitioners such as nurses and non-core physicians, such as family practice doctors. Paramedical aesthetic programs offer comprehensive studies on numerous topics. They can be an invaluable resource to aestheticians who wish to pursue a career in the medical field. Paramedical aesthetic programs can also offer exposure and training on areas of practice for paramedical professionals and non-core physicians who wish to incorporate medical aesthetics into private practice. Paramedical aesthetic programs are not considered part of certified training or licensure in the medical field, but they can give practitioners invaluable knowledge in the area of aesthetic medicine. Some paramedical programs offer studies in cosmetic dermatology and anti-aging medicine, as well as specific topics of practice. With paramedical aesthetic programs, it is best to research the company and know the credentials and level of expertise of the professionals who are offering the program.

Working in the Medical Field
Some aestheticians choose to pursue careers in the medical field, such as working with dermatologists or plastic surgeons. A growing number of non-core physicians, such as family practice physicians, are choosing to implement cosmetic procedures into private practice, which increases the demand of opportunities for aestheticians who wish to embark in the medical field. One of the best ways for aestheticians to increase a chance in the medical field is to have advanced education training. There are many programs available, including specialized courses in chemical exfoliation, microdermabrasion, and laser training. Another way aestheticians can get exposure into the medical and laser field is to attend seminars which are held locally by various laser companies. There is no cost for these seminars and it is a great way to gain insight into laser technology and network with other medical professionals. The seminars are hosted by laser sales representatives, who may become an invaluable resource for career opportunities in the medical field. Most seminars have a physician guest speaker who discusses laser technology and applications in the medical field, which includes a detailed training manual for each attendee. These seminars not only give aestheticians exposure into the medical field, but they may also include a certificate of attendance, which can be included in a career portfolio. Aestheticians need to understand that advanced education in laser or IPL, is only recognized as such. It is not considered as formal training when working in a medical practice. Training on laser and IPL is state regulated and most states require by law that the esthetician must be trained on laser or IPL by the medical director, or by a nurse practitioner sometimes qualified as a laser safety officer. Once trained by the medical director the aesthetician becomes "certified" on that specific piece of laser or IPL equipment. Any previous training or advanced training on laser or IPL technology is not recognized at the state licensing or regulatory level when working in a medical practice. Advanced training in laser and IPL will only enhance credibility as a licensed professional and demonstrate exposure in the medical aesthetic field. It is up to the aesthetician to decide whether to pay large tuitions in laser training or obtain advanced training in cosmetic medicine for career advancement, which will increase opportunities of employment with a medical practice. In any case, advanced education will be recognized by physician employers, and is essential for entering the medical field.

Master Aesthetician Licensure
A master aesthetician is one who has experience in the medical field. In most states, there is no master aesthetics license. Master aesthetic licensure is being introduced at state licensing levels, with involvement and encouragement from aesthetic training institutes, cosmetology, or publishing companies. Other companies such as the NSPEP, offers a master level of recognition. By submitting professional credentials and medical training certificates the aesthetician can receive recognition. The aesthetician must also submit a letter signed by the physician employer, which states the level of experience and competency of the aesthetician working in a medical environment unsupervised by the physician. The master of aesthetics certificate, either through licensure or certificate of achievement, is the highest level of recognition in the aesthetic field.

Linda-Gulla-2014Linda Gulla is founder of the International Institute for the Advancement of Aesthetic Medicine, and offers advanced training to professionals as an educator and adjunct instructor in CME and CE. Gulla shares her knowledge in medical aesthetics, giving presentations to professionals at the International Dermal Institute. She has authored and published resource manuals in medical aesthetics and shared her expertise in advanced aesthetics as an editorial reviewer with Milady. Gulla provides professionals with opportunities for career advancement with the convenience of self-study, offering the first online certification in medical aesthetics, which includes content that has been accredited by the ACCME. iiaam.edu@gmail.com?



Read More
By Linda Gulla | January 21, 2019

When young aestheticians start out in their new journey, the opportunities are endless as to the direction of their career. At first, newly licensed aestheticians are eager to begin their careers and experience the fulfillment of her learning. As their careers progress over time, these aestheticians will discover what they love most about their field and may choose to pursue extensive schooling in one aspect of the field. When deciding to change career direction, these aestheticians have various avenues that can be chosen.
Aestheticians may choose to specialize in a specific area such as hair removal or spa services like body wraps or hydrotherapy. Most aestheticians enjoy the cosmetic field and may choose to specialize in makeup artistry. With makeup artistry, there are numerous avenues for the aesthetician to specialize in, such as permanent makeup or makeup for film and photography. Pursuing a career as a makeup artist will require additional training that will broaden the range of career opportunities, as well as offer the ability to work as a freelance makeup artist.

Continuing Education
There is a difference between advanced education and continuing education. In many states, a minimum number of hours of continuing education is required each year in order to maintain licensure. The aesthetician can choose from various areas of interest, which will enhance their knowledge within the workplace. Most continuing education courses are not accredited. They are offered by other professionals pursuing their own business in education. With continuing education, each professional should inquire at the state licensing level that the continuing education program is recognized by the state in which licensure is registered. The purpose of continuing education is to ensure licensure and enhance knowledge within a specific area of interest. Some continuing education courses do offer a certificate of achievement, which can be included in a career portfolio.

Advanced Education
Advanced education classes are designed for professionals who wish to pursue a higher standard of learning in a specific area of interest. Advanced education courses are available at many levels and may include many different areas of study. Advanced studies give the aesthetician the opportunity to pursue areas of interest, and in most cases, receive a certificate of achievement in that specific area of expertise. Advanced education will evidence that the professional wishes for career advancement and will make the professional more desirable to employers when compared to others who have not chosen advanced education. Not only will acquiring numerous training certificates enable these aestheticians to advance careerwise in the direction of choice, it allows them to be recognized as specialists in particular areas of study. With advanced education, aestheticians will escalate up the career ladder, as well as add credibility as a licensed professional. The aesthetician should know that some advanced education programs are accredited, but it is not required, nor is it a necessity, for recognition or job placement within the industry.
Most advanced education programs are offered by other licensed professionals who wish to pursue their own business in education. With advanced training programs, aestheticians should know the credentials and level of expertise of the professional who is offering the program, and they should ensure that the program offers the most up to date technology and information available. To ensure the highest level of credibility, advanced training educators should know, clarify, and state the practicing laws regarding the area of study and the most current scope of practice. It is the responsibility of the aesthetician to know state licensing laws and to practice within the current scope of licensure. Since state licensing laws are constantly changing, the aesthetician should keep current and updated on state licensing laws.

Advanced Clinical Aesthetic Programs
A clinical aesthetic program and certification is for aestheticians who wish to gain knowledge of advanced clinical skin care treatments. Clinical aesthetic programs offer studies in corrective skin care procedures that can be utilized in a skin care clinic or medical spa. Most clinical aesthetic programs offer a certificate of training, which can open new doors of opportunities to the aesthetician. Certificates of training on various topics will give the aesthetician an edge to furthering her knowledge and career. He or she will be in more demand within the job market.

Paramedical Aesthetic Programs
A paramedical aesthetic program is designed exclusively for aestheticians who wish to enter the medical field. This can include other medical practitioners such as nurses and non-core physicians, such as family practice doctors. Paramedical aesthetic programs offer comprehensive studies on numerous topics. They can be an invaluable resource to aestheticians who wish to pursue a career in the medical field. Paramedical aesthetic programs can also offer exposure and training on areas of practice for paramedical professionals and non-core physicians who wish to incorporate medical aesthetics into private practice. Paramedical aesthetic programs are not considered part of certified training or licensure in the medical field, but they can give practitioners invaluable knowledge in the area of aesthetic medicine. Some paramedical programs offer studies in cosmetic dermatology and anti-aging medicine, as well as specific topics of practice. With paramedical aesthetic programs, it is best to research the company and know the credentials and level of expertise of the professionals who are offering the program.

Working in the Medical Field
Some aestheticians choose to pursue careers in the medical field, such as working with dermatologists or plastic surgeons. A growing number of non-core physicians, such as family practice physicians, are choosing to implement cosmetic procedures into private practice, which increases the demand of opportunities for aestheticians who wish to embark in the medical field. One of the best ways for aestheticians to increase a chance in the medical field is to have advanced education training. There are many programs available, including specialized courses in chemical exfoliation, microdermabrasion, and laser training. Another way aestheticians can get exposure into the medical and laser field is to attend seminars which are held locally by various laser companies. There is no cost for these seminars and it is a great way to gain insight into laser technology and network with other medical professionals. The seminars are hosted by laser sales representatives, who may become an invaluable resource for career opportunities in the medical field. Most seminars have a physician guest speaker who discusses laser technology and applications in the medical field, which includes a detailed training manual for each attendee. These seminars not only give aestheticians exposure into the medical field, but they may also include a certificate of attendance, which can be included in a career portfolio. Aestheticians need to understand that advanced education in laser or IPL, is only recognized as such. It is not considered as formal training when working in a medical practice. Training on laser and IPL is state regulated and most states require by law that the esthetician must be trained on laser or IPL by the medical director, or by a nurse practitioner sometimes qualified as a laser safety officer. Once trained by the medical director the aesthetician becomes "certified" on that specific piece of laser or IPL equipment. Any previous training or advanced training on laser or IPL technology is not recognized at the state licensing or regulatory level when working in a medical practice. Advanced training in laser and IPL will only enhance credibility as a licensed professional and demonstrate exposure in the medical aesthetic field. It is up to the aesthetician to decide whether to pay large tuitions in laser training or obtain advanced training in cosmetic medicine for career advancement, which will increase opportunities of employment with a medical practice. In any case, advanced education will be recognized by physician employers, and is essential for entering the medical field.

Master Aesthetician Licensure
A master aesthetician is one who has experience in the medical field. In most states, there is no master aesthetics license. Master aesthetic licensure is being introduced at state licensing levels, with involvement and encouragement from aesthetic training institutes, cosmetology, or publishing companies. Other companies such as the NSPEP, offers a master level of recognition. By submitting professional credentials and medical training certificates the aesthetician can receive recognition. The aesthetician must also submit a letter signed by the physician employer, which states the level of experience and competency of the aesthetician working in a medical environment unsupervised by the physician. The master of aesthetics certificate, either through licensure or certificate of achievement, is the highest level of recognition in the aesthetic field.

Linda-Gulla-2014Linda Gulla is founder of the International Institute for the Advancement of Aesthetic Medicine, and offers advanced training to professionals as an educator and adjunct instructor in CME and CE. Gulla shares her knowledge in medical aesthetics, giving presentations to professionals at the International Dermal Institute. She has authored and published resource manuals in medical aesthetics and shared her expertise in advanced aesthetics as an editorial reviewer with Milady. Gulla provides professionals with opportunities for career advancement with the convenience of self-study, offering the first online certification in medical aesthetics, which includes content that has been accredited by the ACCME. iiaam.edu@gmail.com



Read More
By Jeremy Lawrence | January 21, 2019

As we start the process of preparing for our annual tax returns for our personal lives and professional businesses, we must always consider every possible opportunity to take advantage of all the legal tax-saving advantages in order to minimize our personal and business tax liability. It is never a fun process making sure we saved all of those necessary receipts to verify any questionable business-related expenses. Let us try and review how we can minimize the process and make the best of it in spite of this necessary evil.

The first thing you need is a good tax professional to assist you. Tax laws change annually and there is no way for you to keep on top of the regulations. Hopefully your accountant has taken continuing education classes and has kept up with everything that will allow you to properly prepare your returns. The worst case scenario is you could always file for an extension and submit Form 4868, giving you a six-month extension if you need more time. However, you must submit your anticipated tax liability if you believe you will owe any taxes. This eliminates any penalty that can be assessed by the IRS.
Review your previous filing status, as this may have changed over previous years. Such examples may include marriage, child dependent additions and deletions, divorce, the death of a spouse, head of household due to additional dependent care, and so on. These may allow you additional or less tax deductions than previous years.
Make sure you are aware of any local and state tax filings for which you may be responsible. Many cities and states have their own municipal and state tax requirements that are tied in with your federal tax return deadlines. Some municipalities have reciprocal agreements with other cities and states, which eliminates dual taxation if you live in one city/state and work in another, and vice versa.
Many municipalities also have tangible and intangible property taxes which require you to file tax reports for personal property, equipment, and other assets you own. Check with your professional tax preparer for the proper requirements for non-income related tax obligations.
Your personal taxes are not limited to your personal income from your employment or business. Your total income also consists of many forms including: personal income from W-2s, income from partnerships (K-1), income from subchapter S corporations, interest and dividends from bank accounts and investments, profits from the sale of investments, gambling and prize income, and some gift and estate income. You may also deduct losses from these forms of non-employment related income to offset your tax liability.
Make sure you have taken full advantage of IRAs (simple, traditional, and Roth) where you may have the ability to deduct your allowable contributions until your retirement. This allows you to pay the respective tax liability when your income may be at a lower rate. You may have until April 15th of the filing year to contribute additional money (up to the allowable limit) into your retirement fund. Not all IRAs are the same, and tax liabilities may differ, but all of them do have tax advantages. Check with your tax professional for current regulations and advantages.
For your business, since document assembly is of most importance, make sure you have all your payroll records available, including W-2s for employees and 1099s for any independent contractors. You must send your employees and contractors their respective copies by January 31st of the tax filing year. W-3s, which show the total of all of the W-2s, must be sent to the Social Security Administration by the last day in February of the filing year.
When it comes to the end of the year, it might be best to pay all your outstanding expenses if you have sufficient operating capital or anticipated income to sustain you through the first quarter of next year. This can substantially reduce the amount of capital and possible profit left in the business at the end of the year, thereby reducing the increased tax liability you may incur.
Let us take a look at what information you must have to give you the most advantages in preparing your tax return. You should always have a detailed list of your fixed assets to make sure your capital equipment is up to date. If you purchased anything during the year, take advantage of the possible one-time Section 179 tax credits where applicable. Having previous schedules of depreciation can allow you to take full advantage and additional depreciation dollars for the current tax year return.
You must determine which expenses you have incurred and group them into categories for easy reconciliation. Good software, such as QuickBooks and Quicken, makes this much easier to calculate. Each and every invoice you pay throughout the year should be detailed as much as possible into categories. Examples include: accounting, automotive expenses, continuing education, legal, licenses, office expenses, office supply, medical equipment, medical supply, postage, training, and travel.
Proper software will allow you to create a chart of accounts and print detailed reports by category, date, vendor, and more, filing from periods of time for comparison purposes. It also allows you to save the files (reports included) and forward them electronically to your tax professional.
Keep all your bank statements in one place to verify your deposits, which show checks, credit cards, and cash deposits. This will be extremely important in an audit. Now that banks and most, if not all, financial institutions have your bank statements housed online, you can eliminate having to keep them in your office. Print them only when necessary.
So many businesses save all their receipts in files or banker’s boxes and then have to pay to shred them due to confidential information (bank account and social security numbers) being available on these documents. A secured process is to scan your confidential documents and save them electronically where you can store them on a secured server, external hard drive, and even in the cloud where you can send links for these private files to your tax professional.
The most consistent common denominator is your professional tax advisor. I cannot stress enough how important the advice of a professional can be in order to take advantage of new tax regulations. These change every year and it is almost impossible for us to keep on top of them. If you have a question as to whether or not something is a proper or legal deduction, do not assume it is. Go with your gut and try not to rationalize. Your tax advisor is the best source of information.
Good luck, and be prepared to tackle this again next year. There is no way around it. It is part of our system, and the best advice I can offer is to play by the rules. The consequences are much worse than the reward.

Jay A. Shorr, B.A., MBM-C, CAC I-V, is the founder and managing partner of The Best Medical Business Solutions, assisting medical practices with the operational, financial, and administrative health of their business. He is also a professional motivational speaker, an advisor to the Certified Aesthetic Consultant program and a certified medical business manager from Florida Atlantic University. shorrsolutions.com



Read More
By Jeremy | January 21, 2019

"Being prepared almost always translates to success. I always have a list of questions and a copy of the candidate's resume in the room with me. I also like to thoroughly read their resume beforehand and try to tailor the questions I ask to their previous job or school experience. I always try to be as prepared as possible with my answers as well; it is important for me to have a salary in mind and know the particulars of their job duties. Being prepared with both my questions and my answers shows the candidate that my spa is professional and organized." Makenna Jones, owner of Awe Spa 200

"My interviews are always successful if I make the interviewee feel as comfortable as possible. While I do not want the atmosphere to be too informal, it is important to develop rapport. I usually try to find mutual interests and briefly discuss that topic with them. The interviewee instantly feels more relaxed and is more likely to be themselves if they feel like they have an
ally on the other side of the desk". Abigail Wagner, managing aesthetician at Beyond the Daze Spa and Salon

"One of the most important aspects of a successful interview is remembering to make the interview all about the interviewee. The best thing an interviewer can do is let the candidate do the talking when the time comes. I try to only ask open-ended questions in order to get them to open up and elucidate. I am there to learn about them and the best way to do that is to stop talking and listen." Serena Martinez, owner of Fates Day Spa

"Hiring someone is really about making sure the company is the right fit for them. I spend the first half of the interview talking about the company, job responsibilities, atmosphere, and expectations for the employee. This gives them a chance to listen, absorb, and relax. I ask them if they have any questions for me, which lets their guard down and gets them talking without feeling so nervous. Afterwards, I conduct a normal interview with questions about their past employment, education, and availability. This interview method has always been successful for me and my team." Allison Strickland, owner of Harmonious Day Spa

"Take notes! When interviewing multiple candidates in one day, jotting down notes while they talk becomes very important. No matter how great an interview goes, I cannot truly consider it a success if I am not able to remember what they said and how they responded to my questions." Vanessa Rodino, owner and manager of Design Medical Spa



Read More

DERMASCOPE Digital Login