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By Jeremy Lawrence | January 21, 2019

Rachael Pontillo is the bestselling author of "Love Your Skin, Love Yourself" and co-author of "The Sauce Code." She is an AADP and IAHC Board Certified International Health Coach, licensed aesthetician, certified Nutritional Aesthetics Practitioner®, a natural skin care formulator and educator, and a holistic business mentor. Pontillo is currently pursuing her Ph.D. in Holistic Life Counseling and holds additional certifications in metaphysical science, detoxification, acupressure, Reiki, Chinese facial diagnosis, and Ayurveda. She is an avid herbalist, self-professed skin care ingredient junkie, and lifelong learner.

Is there a particular moment or procedure where most skin care professionals go wrong?
Assuming there is nothing new to learn is a huge mistake. This industry is changing so fast, it will pass us by if professionals do not keep up and be part of the forward movement. Professionals should always keep learning. I also do not like seeing negativity, gossip, and cattiness among aestheticians on Facebook. It lowers the professionalism of the entire industry and that negativity ultimately spreads to the client. Aestheticians should act as if their mother, clients, teachers, and children are reading their posts. Show respect to other aestheticians and clients and do not spread bad news or participate in gossip, shaming, or online power struggles.

Why do you think people are loyal to certain brands?pic1
I think sometimes it is out of comfort or out of fear of change.

What is the toughest decision you have had to make at your company?
To outsource and delegate. I like doing things myself and being in control of everything from inception to execution, but we are better and faster and achieve more with collaboration instead of isolation.

How did you come up with the name of your business?
I focused on what I was trying to communicate, how I wanted to feel doing my work, and how I wanted my audience to feel consuming it. I made lists, asked for feedback, and voila.

Which honor or achievement are you most proud of?
I won the Institute for Integrative Nutrition's Health Leadership Award. My #1 Amazon Bestseller ranking in the skin care and skin ailments categories was pretty cool too!

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Here's more of our chat with Rachael:

How did you decide that skin care was the right industry for you?
Once I experienced how life changes once you heal from a skin condition, I knew I needed to help others who suffer experience that change.

What characteristics or skills distinguish you from your peers and enabled you to be successful so quickly?
I am innovative. I look for gaps and missing links in current modalities and approaches and I either fill them, link them, or find new solutions to solve problems. I also come from a sales, marketing, and editorial background and was able to use these skills to create a brand and a platform that resulted in industry support and a widespread reach.

What adaptations have you made over the years to stay relevant in the industry?
I have taken it upon myself to learn technology, further my business and marketing education, and work with amazing coaches.

What has been the biggest change in the skin care industry?
The rise of nutritional aesthetics and the influence of all the other industries that have led to it, including green beauty, organic food, health coaching, wellness, nutrition, naturopathy, and herbalism.

What do you see as an upcoming trend in the industry?
More of an integration of nutrition and wellness into aesthetics.

What is your biggest hope for the industry going forward?
That aestheticians will continue their education and learn to support each other's efforts on a more global scale, as well as learn to work effectively with practitioners in other supporting fields.

Is there a particular ingredient that you feel is a "super" ingredient? If so, why?
No. There is no single ingredient that is super for every person, since everyone has different bio-individual needs.

Other than your products, what are the greatest assets and strengths your company offers?
Our core philosophy, and care for people – clients, members, and co-workers – as inherently decent and worthy human beings.

As you grew your company, did you have any significant moments of clarity that helped shape its future and course?
Writing my first book, "Love Your Skin, Love Yourself," gave me the opportunity to share my story and allowed others to connect with me and see themselves both in my struggle and my success. I have gotten more clients from the book than any other marketing initiative. It also clarified my why, which, in marketing, is the start to many great things.

What advice do you have for someone planning to start a career in this field?
Be creative, think outside the box, never give up, and always prioritize your own self-care.

You wear so many hats in this industry. What is your secret to keeping life in balance and enjoying the journey?
Knowing how to schedule myself efficiently, asking for help and delegating when needed, allowing myself to rest and refresh, and knowing when to let go and when to move on.

Can you share something that most people wouldn't know about you?
I am a ballerina and a homeschooling parent.

How and where do you find inspiration?
Nature, my children and colleagues, music, art, dance, and books.

Who does it right in Hollywood?
I have always been a Jennifer Aniston fan, but, overall, I do not believe in idolizing celebrities.

If you could treat one person, who would it be?
Anyone who truly values our exchange.



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By Jeremy Lawrence | January 21, 2019

Janel Luu's extensive background in cosmetic development has benefited many major brands for American, Asian, and European clients and has created the solid foundation of her own premium skin care brands. Luu’s innate love for formulating and her expertise in anti-aging cellular technology have also inspired her to teach more than 25,000 skin care professionals and physicians.

 “I have been in the aesthetics industry for over 30 years, holding various roles of product formulator, product developer, and educator. Some of the greatest pressures in my work is simply understanding people and trying to help them focus on their goals. Focusing on the big picture – the goals of the company – is paramount. One common goal is getting the consumer to visit the spa. Main3I think consumers visit a particular spa because they seek a unique experience, as well as treatment results. In addition, a personal relationship between the client and the aesthetician is also very important. This can separate the best establishments from the rest. Aestheticians should be paying attention to detail while working with the client.Main2 Also, by offering unique treatments – like gua sha and meridian points, for example – a client will fall in love with a certain spa. We use jade tools and volcanic cups to provide clients with a new, exotic experience. These treatments are a fusion of the East and West – and they provide excellent detoxifying and re-countouring results. The gua sha tools (called “wind” and “crown”) and the volcanic cups are an integral part of our treatment room. Clients are always intrigued by these tools and how effective they are in optimizing the results of facials. But no matter what tools are used in the treatment room, I continuously give this advice: Have a strong vision and a desire to be different. Do not follow the crowd; Instead, think outside the box and be a little radical! Life is an ongoing experiment, not a tally of successes and failures. I have always been very surprised that people do not embrace change. If a strategy does not work well, changes must take place in order to make progress. I embrace change by always trying to stay relevant in the industry. I do this by educating myself every day so that I can stay on the cutting edge of technology and ingredient innovation. I like to think outside of the box. I like being different and not fearful of change. I stubbornly strive to be better every day.”



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By | January 21, 2019

Editor’s Note: Client care is such an immense topic, both in its scope and importance that we felt it demanded the attention of a complete issue. Beyond that we wanted the feature article to be extensive and complete. So we called upon two individuals to write the following piece based on their expertise in specific areas of customer service. We have taken both writers’ submissions and put them together for an overall examination of how to care for your clients from before they even arrive on your property until they return for their next appointment.
So, with all that being said, you will sense a bit of difference in the writing styles, but both authors did an excellent job covering the details of their respective sections. Crickett focused on the journey of the senses and details of the client; Jaya’s attention is centered on the knowledge of the aesthetician and how you can offer, and by they way your client’s are seeking, so much more than just a good face massage during the treatment.


Are You Magic??
When a guest comes into your establishment, what do they see? What do they feel, smell, hear, and maybe even taste? Your focus on the details of client care gives the ability to take a satisfactory experience into an extraordinary and magical one.
This magic can reside in a one room spa studio or in a 10 room mega spa. It can exist in the surgi-center medi-spa or the multipurpose treatment room in the back of a conventional salon.

What Is This Magic??
Walt Disney once said, “You can dream, create, design, and build the most wonderful place in the world, but it requires people to make the dream a reality.” The love is in the details and it most certainly is the cornerstone to guest satisfaction, and moreover, guest retention. If you understand your guest’s needs you can position your details to embrace them from the minute they set a foot down on your property until they are snuggly nestled in their car, sighing contentedly driving back toward what is real life for them. The bottom line is your guests want to feel understood. They want to feel a sense of belonging and security that they will be treated the way they want to be treated. When you act with this as your underlying motivation, you and your guests will create some very real magic. In other words, if your guest finds something in your organization that hits them in an emotional place, they will come away from their experience feeling the internal warmth they were seeking not just like another cog in the wheel of an industry.

Make Some Magic
In September 2005, Coyle Hospitality Group released a report that stated the most important virtues for their establishment to embody (in order from most important) are quality of experience, cleanliness, cost = value of experience, and friendliness of experience provider. Only 61 percent of clients were likely to complain if their experience was not satisfactory, and only about half of the silent 39 percent said they would consider returning. No complaint, no justification, no resolution, simply no return.
The next time you enter your facility, before you open the front door take a deep breath and enter as if you are a guest. Take a moment to remember why you go there and then visualize one of your most likeable and enjoyable guests. Envision as you put your hand on the doorknob what they are feeling as they are entering. Walk through the door and see what they see. Look at the big picture. Look to your left and scan 180 degrees. Make a note of any dust bunnies, cobwebs, or (gasp!) dead bugs that need tending and / or possible eviction. Look under couches and in between cushions. Inspect the upholstery for stains and signs of wear. How does the ceiling look? Do the light bulbs all work? This impression is going to be measured against what they perhaps have heard of your business and also what they are hopefully, and excitedly, anticipating.
What does the guest smell at this point in the experience? What could they smell at this point in the journey that is an extension of your intent for their experience? A scented candle or oil diffuser is a signature of your establishment and can be a subtle support of the mellow exhilaration they feel when they know they are about to do something good for themselves. The guest’s next stop is to reception.
Take a physical inventory of how you have set the stage for your guest. Something as simple as a million multi-colored post-it notes stuck everywhere and 40 pens or pencils strewn across the desk give a cluttered appearance that reads as disorganized and inefficient. Consider implementing a hardbound communication log book (available at your local office supply store) where each guest service assistant will record and notate information, policy, and new procedural memorandum during or at the conclusion of their shift. Each guest service assistant can begin their shift by reading all entries made since the conclusion of their last shift to update themselves and know what is currently in the works. No more post-its to lose and definitely more aesthetically pleasing. Take advantage of the plethora of beautiful, cost-effective, organizational items available at your local superstore to blend your office supplies into the décor of your facility. Clean lines and good organization reads as “efficiency” to your guests.


To read more please subscribe to DERMASCOPE Magazine...


Crickett (Christina) Cimino LE CMT is the Founder and Lead Technician at FUSION Mind Body Spirit and INVOKE artistry by FUSION in Westminster, Md. She is a licensed aesthetician, NCTMB massage therapist, make-up artist, and licensed manicure/pedicurist. Cimino is also an instructor and post-graduate educator for Von Lee International School of Aesthetics in Baltimore, Md.

Jaya Schillinger is a spa business coach with 20+ years in beauty, health, and personal development. Her company, Inspiration Inc., works exclusively with holistic businesses. Drawing on front-line experience and training as a Professional Certified Coach, Schillinger provides strategic coaching and training that results in improved performance, profitability, and job satisfaction. She is a popular speaker at spa industry events such as the Day Spa Expo and Spa Owners & Operators Business Clinic.



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By | January 21, 2019

by Leah R. Patterson


Vibrational healing or medicine is a term used to describe the modalities that influence the energy fields and centers of a person in order to bring about healing. Combined with aesthetics, the practice of advanced skin care, powerfully effective treatments designed to promote inner and outer (and therefore longer lasting) healing are very possible. The modalities of vibrational healing use a number of vehicles, including the five senses, flower essences, and vibrational frequencies. Light therapy, homeopathy, and flower essence remedies are examples. The principle of activity in all of these is that everything, even down to cells has a vibrational pattern that equals healthiness. These various methods then are used to coax the subject back to its healthy vibration. Because it works on such a basic level, it is in essence the very root of what a cure is.

Aesthetics relates to vibrational healing on a basic level. The practice of aesthetics is known to improve clients’ self esteem and sense of self-worth by visibly enhancing the appearance and health of the skin. This generation of positive thoughts, which has been scientifically proven to have a beneficial effect on healing, enhances the work done through vibrational healing. These positive thoughts put the client more in alignment with a healthier vibration. Scientific works have shown in fact that happier thoughts result in a healthier disposition, which, in terms of vibrational healing, also means a healthier vibration. The results possible then from the vibrational energy work are that much more enhanced because of the positive state of the client. This also works in reverse, meaning that vibrational healing enhances the results of the aesthetic work as well. This happens by way of the healthier vibration created. This vibrational state sets a stage for more complete results to be obtained from any treatments performed. This is because the more in alignment one can become with the healing/corrective process, the faster it is able to manifest.

Vibrational energy techniques range from those that require hands on touch and body manipulations to those that require no physical contact whatsoever. This paper will explore four such modalities. Vibrational aromatherapy, acupressure, flower essence therapy, and crystal therapy will each be discussed in the context of its relation to the practice of aesthetics. The principles as well as different ways to incorporate each will be explored and practical examples of application will be offered.

Aesthetics and Vibrational Aromatherapy

Vibrational Aromatherapy is a form of vibrational medicine that employs essential oils specifically through smells and touch therapy. Essential oils are fragrant, concentrated plant extracts; Aromatherapy itself is the art and science of using the therapeutic properties of these oils to promote health and well-being. Vibrational Aromatherapy uses hand gestures coupled with relevant essential oils to bring about changes in a person’s energy field. In particular, work is directed toward the energy centers or Chakras of the human body, which serve as the focal points for this energy work.

In relation to aesthetics, essential oils are already a well-known and respected tool. Most are familiar with using essential oils for their olfactory benefit in creating a pleasingly scented environment. Aestheticians with an interest in natural skin care also use essential oils for the physiological benefit they possess.

Beyond these ways, essential oils can operate on an energetic level. Just as each essential oil has its unique physiological and emotional properties, so does each have its characteristic energetic properties. These properties span conditions, covering physical, psychological, and energetic (spiritual) imbalances. The reason this is possible is because essential oils work on a vibrational level, affecting the energy pattern that has been created by the imbalance so that it resonates at a healthy vibration again.

In aesthetics work, this added layer of affect is very powerful. With the addition of using essential oils energetically, the aesthetician can encourage physiological and emotional changes that are much longer lasting. Clients often walk in with issues well beyond the indications of a basic facial. On the aesthetics bed or in the consultation, aestheticians are usually presented with these conditions, whether verbally from the client or through body language and the client’s general demeanor. Through vibrational aromatherapy, the aesthetician is empowered to address these issues so that her treatments become more and more highly and reproducibly effective. Clients who walk in with excessive anger, depression, stress, worry, etc. can receive more than the residual relief that a spa experience typically gives. The client can actually walk away with a changed outlook and genuinely revived sense of well-being.

Vibrational Aromatherapy work can easily be introduced into a facial protocol without creating any disturbances for the client whatsoever. In particular, there are various hand manipulations that are done with the addition of essential oils that can be incorporated. They involve holding hands over certain body parts or applying gentle pressure to them. This all fits into the realm of the type of facial and body manipulations that aestheticians perform. In essence, what creates the difference is the intent behind the techniques and the use of specific essentials oils.

Filling, is a technique used to gently energize a client and is useful for person’s experiencing general fatigue, emotional emptiness, mental or physical fatigue. It is performed by placing the palms on the shoulders of the receiver and following this process: the aesthetician visualizes drawing energy from the earth through the bottoms of his/her feet and filling the fourth energy center or Chakra (in the Heart area). The aesthetician then visualizes that energy moving through the fifth energy center (the Throat area), down his/her arms, and out of his/her hands to fill the receiver. This is held for 5 minutes. Before beginning this, the aesthetician premixes the appropriate essential oils in a carrier oil and rubs the resulting mixture onto his/her hands before placing on the client. Good essential oils for this process include Lavender for gently energizing, Orange for filling with joy, Clary sage for relieving physical fatigue, and rosemary for relieving mental fatigue.

This process can be performed at the beginning of a facial if the client is particularly upset and stressed or towards the end of the facial to energize the client and prepare them to reenter into their daily life more refreshed and renewed.

Aesthetics and Acupressure

The next modality to be discussed is acupressure. Acupressure is a form of vibrational healing that centers around pulse points or energy spots within the body. This system was developed within Chinese Traditional Medicine and deals with the flow of chi (life force) through meridians (energy lines) that run throughout the body. Ancient Chinese practitioners believed that illness begins as stagnation or over excessiveness in the flow of this energy and that stimulation of pulse points results in the correction of this flow.

Acupressure is performed by applying firm three-finger pressure at specific points on the body. This pressure increases the flow of blood and oxygen to that area, thereby moving out toxins and releasing tensions. In facial massage, this increase softens lines, tones and tightens sagging skin, and generally provides a natural facelift. With repeated treatments, clients can see notable changes in the appearance and radiance of their skin.

Within body treatments, acupressure provides relief of specific physical issues, such as lower back pain, cold and flu symptoms, headaches and migraines, etc. It is also possible to address physio-emotional issues with body acupressure. Anxiety, depression, memory and concentration improvement, and insomnia can all be addressed with acupressure treatments.

An acupressure treatment addressing a certain issue consists of a certain series of pressure points to stimulate in a particular order. There are a number of online resources as well as excellent books that give these sequences. Soundtells.com provides an excellent online and downloadable guide to acupressure. Timeless Face : 30 Days To A Younger You Through Face Reading, Acupressure, and Toning by Ellae Elinwood provides specific exercises and information on home care that aestheticians can use to create a full treatment system for acupressure facelift.

Aesthetics and Flower Essence Therapy

Flower Essences are substances created from the flowers of plants and said to contain the essence of those plants within them. Flower essences fit into vibrational energy healing because each plant is believed to have a distinctive vibration based on its color and essence. Their purpose is to affect the emotional state of a client, with the specific result of restoring mental harmony and preventing physical illness from taking hold.

Flower essences are generally used internally and can be incorporated into a facial treatment as post or pre care. Often times, the process of a facial will relieve emotional strains a client may be undergoing through the calming and rebalancing effect. In order to prolong and make more permanent the relief, an aesthetician can recommend specific flower essences for the client to use as maintenance during their home care. Examples of essences that might be useful in dealing with your clients are as follows:

Red Chestnut is a good choice for clients who worry excessively about their loved ones. The mother who worries over her teenage child is the perfect example of this. A treatment session will undoubtedly relax this mother and temporarily relieve her of the stress of worrying however this is most certainly temporary. By recommending and providing the Red Chestnut flower essence, it’s possible for the aesthetician to give her client a means to welcome this relief into her everyday life.

Aestheticians can use Impatiens to soothe the client that is continuously irritated by any minor delay in his or her schedule. For instance if a client comes in and circumstances beyond control creates a situation where he/she must wait longer than expected, this is a wonderful essence to give in a glass of water to help the client relax and enjoy their treatment. After the service, the aesthetician can easily talk about this essence, citing the effects it had on the client’s state of mind throughout the treatment, and suggest it as an option for similar situations for the client’s use.

Heather is another excellent flower essence that can be used to help clients with personal issues they have that surface subtly in a treatment session. Often times, aestheticians receive clients who share the bulk of their troubles with them. When an aesthetician begins to notice this pattern, with flower essences, she is empowered to recognize a potential emotional issue and make a recommendation that might help without having to directly bring up what she has perceived. Heather is particularly indicated for people who, out of a fear of loneliness and a need to keep an audience, share their troubles with anyone who will listen. They are generally self-centered and very poor at listening and empathizing with others.

Using Flower Essence in this way provides a powerful tool for the aesthetician in expanding her range of tools and ultimately effective options to address her clients skin care needs and life concerns.

Aesthetics and Crystal Therapy

Crystals and aesthetics work together on the same principles as the other vibrational modalities discussed. Crystals are used in a therapeutic setting by practitioners because of their vibrational patterns. The belief is that crystals, according to their color, density, and opaqueness give off vibrations that are able to realign vibrational disturbances caused by different human emotions and physical conditions. Placing a certain crystal on a specific energy center/Chakra (see vibrational aromatherapy section) for instance can alleviate a problem associated with that Chakra by coaxing the energy to flow at the same vibration as the crystal. This in turn is the proper vibration for a healthy state of being for that area.

In aesthetics work, crystals can be added to facial and body treatments in order to address both physical and emotional concerns of clients. Crystal facials, as an example, have become very popular and consist of using specific crystals to help clients reach a deeper state of relaxation and achieve a more holistic benefit from the service provided. Most clients in today’s world are great candidates for services that relieve stress and rebalance the energy of the body.

A simple, yet effective crystal treatment that can be added during a rejuvenating mask in a facial follows below:

Crystalwellbeing.com.uk offers up the Moonstone Healing layout to release stress and tension as well as PMS. Moonstone is a crystal generally used for bringing up and easing old emotional issues and the physical conditions that arise because of them. The layout uses five moonstone tumbler stones. A stone is placed on each hipbone and taped down to secure it. Two other stones are placed on the shoulders near the armpits and taped down. The final stone is placed just above and touching the clients head. The crystals are allowed to sit in these positions for 10 to 15 minutes, the same amount of time that most masks are left on the face. During the treatment, the client should begin to experience a soothing energy flowing through the body and may even report an increase in creativity and intuitive ability in the time period following the service.

Another simple, powerful spread is the Chakra balancing layout. This layout uses the color of the stones as the most important element. Each Chakra point corresponds to a specific color, as follows: Crown Chakra (above and touching head) – violet or clear stone, Brow Chakra (in between eyebrows) – indigo or dark blue stone, Throat Chakra – light blue stone, Heart Chakra (middle of chest) – green stone, Solar Plexus Chakra (between navel and ribcage) – yellow stone, Sacral Chakra (lower abdomen) – orange stone, and the Base Chakra (near base of spine between legs) – red or black stone. One more stone, tourmaline or smoky quartz, is placed between the feet for grounding. These stones are left in place for five to 10 minutes, which can again be during the mask phase of a facial. The before treatment consultation and a good crystal guide can help the aesthetician choose the stones most appropriate for the client, thus creating an overall healing experience.

Conclusion

As can be seen through the various modalities and examples above, vibrational energy healing is wonderfully compatible with the practice of aesthetics. It’s incorporation can add a richness and fullness to treatments that without it, may happen, however not nearly as completely. These options are not only effective, but also very simple and easy to add to an aesthetician’s established protocols and procedures. With basic knowledge, he or she can be successful with bringing these elements in; Her treatments will only continue to become more valuable to her clients as her skill and wisdom in the area grows.

The field of aesthetics is continuing to grow into and become respected as a healing, results based modality and it is exciting to see how the addition of Vibrational energy techniques will help it expand and create even better lives for the people it serves. I encourage every aesthetician to try adding at least one of these options to see how much more wonderful their work can be!



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By | January 21, 2019

Dear Jane,
My background is in make-up. I was a professional make-up artist for many years, and recently earned my aesthetics license because I love skin care as well. The two girls who work my front desk and retail area are wonderful sales people, but not skin therapists. How can I help them totruly meet the needs of clients in terms of selling? We get walk-ins who do not necessarily want a treatment that day, but who do want to buy the "right" cleanser, mask, etc.
~ A. Pierce, Long Beach, CA

 

Dear A.,
You raise a question, which is of particular importance to me, since I believe firmly that skin care products should only be sold-in fact, prescribed-by qualified, licensed skin therapists such as yourself. This is said with no disrespect intended to your sales team-good sales skills are also crucial to an effective skin care center's success!
But your team is at a disadvantage, because they cannot examine the skin of the client. This examination, both by eye, using a mag lamp, and by touch, using the ungloved (please!) pads of the fingers, is in my opinion the most essential part of any skin care experience. The combination visual and tactile examination, informed by how various conditions look and feel to the therapist, is an invaluable part of our art-something, which no dermatologist, with all due respect to my own, can offer. As the therapist, you should, of course, be conducting this sort of exam prior to every treatment, and keeping a running file on the client's condition, much like a medical record kept in a doctor's office. Every inch of the face and neck must be considered, and the subtlest data (heat, cold, dryness, grittiness, slackness, tightness, oiliness, flush, congestion, irritation, etc.) noted and recorded as the basis for treatment and take-home product recommendation.
That said-your sales team are not qualified to conduct this exam, and so walk-ins who do not have the opportunity to meet with you cannot be examined in this way. Should you have the leisure, which I doubt, or should you ever hire another therapist at your premises, I strongly recommend that you offer this face examination process, which takes no more than 10 minutes, as a free service to anyone who enters your facility, with no pressure to book an appointment or purchase product. In spite of this no-pressure approach, it's a great way to build business and generate sales.
A real breakthrough I've witnessed in this area is expanding the concept of the product tester unit. A couple of tubes and pots on a stand are really not all that helpful to the client, especially when she is trying to diagnose a condition with very little information.
For this reason, think about creating a larger, more interactive area, similar to the Skin Bar, which we designed for the Dermalogica flagship in Santa Monica, California. This is an area like a sushi bar, with ergonomically correct bar stools. Four or five people can sit at the bar, and we encourage people to linger as long as they like. While at the bar, they are served a cool or warm beverage (no coffee, sodas or alcohol), and provided with a personal steamer, a stretchy hairband to whisk their hair back, an endless supply of hot steam towels, cotton balls and swabs, and an array of products to explore and experience. There is no obligation to buy, but I tell you that no one ever leaves empty-handed. Even if your staff is not therapists, talking with clients at the Skin Bar is an excellent way to learn about an individual's needs and offer correct and constructive action.
What you must do in the interim is to script a meaningful dialogue between your sales staff and the potential walk-in. In the future, make this line of questioning the basis of a written questionnaire to be completed prior to the examination. Until then, by strategically directed verbal questioning, the sales team can at least direct the sale with some degree of expertise.
Developing this menu of questions will require work on your part. You will need to consider common conditions and causes, and then present these in the form of questions, which relate to available product technology. Of course, while your team is selling inventory off the shelf, they also should be positioning the client for future treatment as well.
Once you have the questions in mind, then you must commit to a training regimen for the team. They will become de facto skin care experts - and, ideally, you will experience such tremendous success that ultimately you may be able to offer some support in terms of assisting them in becoming licensed therapists.
First, you may need to do some re-training. If your sales people are accustomed to selling on the basis of cute packaging, gorgeous aroma, brand snob appeal, etc. - they will need an attitude-adjustment! The only reason for a client to purchase a product, and the only reason for you to sell it is with a strong belief that the product will support and improve the client's skin health.
Before launching into a barrage of questions, the seller should ASK if she might ask some questions. Today's client is often stressed, overscheduled, and also a bit sensitive about self-disclosure in today's world of identity theft! A key question if someone is having skin problems is to ask if they are taking medications prescribed by a dermatologist, such as Retin-A or Accutane. You must discuss in depth the implications of these drugs with your team.
More general questions have to do with diet and eating habits-for instance, the Atkins menu may be tough on the kidneys, because of its astronomical protein level. Animal protein is notoriously difficult for the body to process, especially as the metabolism ages; the accumulated protein wastes may result in dark circles under the eyes, for example, which cannot fully be treated with any topical application. If a client complains of dark circles, ask her how much red meat and whole dairy food she's eating.
Another key lifestyle issue to discuss is stress. The Buddha said, "We are our thoughts." Therefore, if you ask a client to measure her level of stress, whatever she says is true, because this is her perception. Stress ravages the skin, as well as the entire system. Stress, for example, may be the cause of "mysterious" acne or breakouts along the jawline and upper throat. This corresponds directly to the adrenals. When adrenal function is exhausted, the desperate adrenal glands flood the body with cortisol and other hormones. This flooding commonly results in blemishes clustered quite specifically along the lower face. If your client is experiencing this, ask her if she has recently changed jobs, moved, taken on a new responsibility, etc. - the answer most likely lies in better time-management and stress reduction, as well as congestion-clearing products.
Ideally, these questions should be asked in a relaxed, intimate manner. The sales person should be able to walk around from behind the desk, take the client's arm or touch her shoulder in a reassuring way, offer her an herbal or botanical drink, or a "smart" water, and talk through a few of these issues as she guides the clients through the retail area.
This is unlikely. More often, the client will charge in, panicked because she's illegally parked, and demand, "What can I do about my dry skin?" To answer her fully, as you know, really requires a lifetime of study. But the client can't wait that long.
The heart of client service is to respond with compassion as well as mere information. For this reason, especially as you transition from a purely sales-oriented sales team to a more service and information-oriented team, I recommend that you keep a good inventory of free trial and sample sizes. Sometimes the only course of action is to allow the client to experiment, if an appointment with a therapist cannot be booked.

BUSINESS TIP
Skin therapists often are shy people. I'm not, I admit! But many are, and really feel most at home in the semi-darkened, hushed, botanically scented recesses of the treatment room.
However, optimum client care requires that the therapist be forthcoming with clients, to greet them warmly, solve problems effectively and professionally, and represent your company and brand with strength.
As part of your performance review cycle, ask all employees to identify their greatest professional fears, and then make the mastery of those fears an objective for the next cycle.
Consider treating your team to executive confidence-building retreats at least once or twice a year. These are usually participatory physical experiences, things like wailing away on goatskin conga drums, or rope and rock climbing. Breaking through the fear barrier-because shyness really is about fear­ - not only is a tremendous bonding experience for your team, but the enhanced confidence will make each member more positive, comfortable, and successful with clients as well.

Jane Wurwand established The International Dermal Institute, a postgraduate skin and body care training center, in 1983. Jane teaches her innovative education and product philosophies throughout the world. Under Jane's continuing direction, The International Dermal Institute is the research and development center for the Dermalogica professional skin care line, introduced in the U.S. in 1986 and currently distributed worldwide. Jane can be contacted through The Dermal Group at 310-352-4784, or by e-mail at janewurwand@dermalogica.com.

 



Read More
By | January 21, 2019

 

 

The life and achievements of skin treatment pioneer Danné Montague-King, are not easy to summarize. Where to start, after more than 40 years of research and travel, pioneering a skin revision methodology that for the most part was decades ahead of its time, and then to only now have his achievements recognized in his native U.S.?
From Russia to Tibet, Europe to Australia and beyond, Danné Montague-King has sought out knowledge in pursuit of his dream to bring aesthetic medicine and beauty therapy together. Long before cosmeceutical and para-medical became marketing buzz words, and long before Heads of State and members of royalty became believers, Danné was committed to hands-on research and hard work – wherever it took him. When asked how he managed to sustain such an incredible journey, this enigmatic man with the Peter Pan grin simply shrugs. “I just got on with it – and I had a lot of help!”

Top surgeons from Beverly Hills endorse his concepts, and his London Harley Street headquarters cater to a growing elite, but none of this has changed his fundamental attitude of always striving to know more and continually improve the treatments that he provides. “The press tries to capitalize on the glamorous aspects of my success, which can be annoying,” says Danné. “But it’s the skin revision work that’s most important to me.”
As far back as the early 1960s, this visionary in the alternative methods of natural pharmacology became aware that something was missing in the way skin care was being approached during that decade. Inspired to self-treat his own severe bouts of acne, Danné soon realized that human cells will not accept that which is either non-essential to their natural make up, or is not recognized as workable fuel. It was his first major discovery. “It took a lot of stumbling in the dark, but then the research started to pay off. I quickly saw how other skin conditions such as aging and the specific problems of ethnic skin could also be treated.”
His first stint in education was teaching skin revision in beauty schools around Chicago. These often had a large black student enrollment and he would regularly take the elevated trains out into the snow bound suburbs to reach them. In the 1970s there was very little in the way of aesthetician courses on offer – his syllabus was totally from his own mind – and the pay was minimal. The students were grateful and would take up a collection for him at the end of class, so that he could continue to teach them.
Years later, when he became friends with American icons Joel Gerson and Carol Walderman – both of whom were dedicated educators – Danné felt embarrassed that his early classes were not structured in the classic way of beauty therapy training. Ironically, both of these top professionals became supporters of his work. Obviously, results speak for themselves.
The Danné Montague-King story began a new chapter when he left Chicago for California to host a television series called Skin Deep. Here he also had the opportunity to set up a lab for continuing research, and for the production of tools that he believed were necessary to make his concepts available to everyone.
Danné has always maintained that products are over emphasized in aesthetics, being at best merely tools. Concept is everything is his life mantra. He stressed the need to look at skin in terms of functionality, structure, and hormonal fluctuation (for example, acne starting in the hypothalamus gland and cortisol levels contributed to many skin problems). He was the first scientist in his field to recognize the power of enzymes in skin treatment – and not enzymes in the products, but the idea of stimulating the many enzymes already in the skin and body, that orchestrate everything. “It’s really very easy to understand,” says Danné. “The human body is a bag of fluids containing a few chemicals that are orchestrated by enzymes and held together with electromagnetic waves. Simple!”
He created the now renowned Remove Rebuild Protect Maintain system, which has revolutionized the way aesthetics is being approached all over Europe, and particularly in China, Russia, and the Ukraine, where most of his colleagues are surgeons and dermatologists. It was his Chicago Black Skin researches that lead him to South Africa in the 1980s, long before apartheid was over. He received a commendation from Zulu King Buthelezi at Parliament House in Cape Town for his work with black people in townships and cities all over the country.
But his real expertise lay with journalism, through which he could enact his firm belief that knowledge should be shared. He was the first journalist to alert Europe and Asia to the powers of alpha hydroxy acids back in the days of the “Acid Reign” for professional application, and yet was the only person to caution against the use of AHAs in home products. A fact which did not make him popular with a lot of manufacturers at the time. Such is the price of commitment to one’s ideals.
It was also during this time that he formulated a topical analgesic based on cryotherapy that he called BIOFREEZE™, which is now one of the most famous products in the world. Selling out his interest and formula for BIOFREEZE™ several years ago allowed Danné to be more selective regarding who would represent his concepts. He could now devote time and energy to ensuring that high-level commitment, comprehensive research, and expert qualifications were attributes that became associated with his skin care treatments.
Danné strongly believes that there should be a positive working relationship between the medical fields and aesthetics professions. To achieve this, he has worked intensively with some of the world’s leading physicians and surgeons in the effort to elevate the importance of proper pre- and post-operative skin revision protocol, surgical alternatives, scar revision, and skin health maintenance for long term results.
As a shift in attitudes slowly took root overseas, Danné was there at the forefront. Whilst lecturing, at Cambridge in the UK, on the true meaning of para-medical, his candid scoffing at the term “cosmecuetical” – as being no more than a marketing device designed to influence the public into believing that products sold under this banner were medically or pharmaceutically enhanced – earned him an invitation to lecture at The Royal Academy of Medicine in London, a stiff upper lip institute that had previously looked down on beauty therapy as playing around. Then in 2009, Danné’s long time educator in the UK, Susan Williams, was invited by the Academy to be a member, a rare first for an aesthetician who was not a doctor of medicine. This was in recognition of her efforts in bridging the gap between aesthetics and medicine in hospitals, clinics, and surgeries throughout Great Britain. “I am extremely proud of her,” says Danné.
Danné is a tireless educator. He annually travels around the world, conducting lectures to professionals and consumers alike. An invited guest speaker at many exhibitions, Danné has become a well-known figure within CIDESCO and BABTEC. Several years ago, Baljeet Suri, owner of The Ray Cochran School of Beauty in London, and a CIDESCO board member, asked Danné to participate in the upgrading and revision of the CIDESCO syllabus – which was nearly 200 years old! “I was flattered,” says Danné, “but I realized such a body of work would require a full time commitment, so I had to decline. My grandmother’s credo of anything worth doing is worth doing well, was ringing in my head.”
As one of the most published aesthetic journalists in the world, Danné Montague-King is a regular contributor to many of the world’s most important professional magazines, including Professional Beauty in four countries, Les Nouvelles Esthetiques, Health and Beauty, Skjonnet og Helse, Australian Beauty Therapy, Beauty New Zealand, Medi Spa Canada, and Irish Beauty. Although his articles can be heavily scientific, his inspirational use of analogies, combined with wit and humor, has created a loyal fan base. At a recent magazine gala on the Thames, he was approached by an enthusiastic therapist from Iceland who hugged him and said, “I never buy anything until I first see what you have to say about it!”
Anyone who has met Danné or listened to one of his lectures will understand why he has become such a popular figure in the media. Some say he epitomizes male vanity, but few will ever say he looks bad. His strong personality is balanced by his knowledge of the industry and his controversial willingness to contradict many of the ways people think within it, which defines him as a truly committed and unique individual.
Over the years, he has been interviewed by many of the top television and radio personalities – including stateside with Geraldo Rivera – and by journalists for magazines such as Marie Claire, Cosmo, Elle, Vogue, and Tattler. European Vogue once ran an article entitled “Derm War Fares,” which listed Danné Montague-King as one of the top five skin specialists in the world – an accolade he has laughed off. “Pure hype! I am only a wild ham cavorting on a field of corn with a message to get out to professionals.” Even with all his successes, Danné does not like to take credit for his vision. “I have never created anything,” he often says. “Nature sets up the rules. A true scientist must first think abstractly, without tunnel vision. All of the premier scientists of the 19th and 20th centuries that gave us telephones and air flight, indeed, pioneers of nearly everything we enjoy today, were ordinary men. Most were without formal educations or degrees, researching simply because they were curious, had imagination, listened to their own hearts, and followed the dictates of nature and the far off music of the universe.” He lays the accolades of success for his skin revision concepts at the feet of the many “giants of science and medicine” who have contributed to his message. But in the end, Danné Montague-King somehow had the loudest voice!
Danné turns 67 this month, but feels no trepidation about getting older. Just like the ancient Chinese, he believes that, “We are born and then we die. What happens in-between is up to us!” And there is certainly no letting up on the in-between, either. Currently, he has assembled a team of experts to bring to the world the finest makeup foundation ever created. It is a dream that Danné has always wanted to turn into reality. “This has been on my mind for a long time,” he says. “For many years, patients at our clinics would ask me about what kind of makeup they should use after their acne or rosacea treatments. I would simply recommend what I knew to be the least harmful. But I always had other ideas in mind. I wanted to formulate a base that covers everything, even scars and tattoos, and that has no heavy oils, lasts all day long, doesn’t rub off on clothing, and yet looks like natural skin in the broadest daylight. A makeup foundation that is not detrimental to the health of skin.”
And this dream has nearly come to fruition, with the makeup range slated for launch in early 2010. Danné never intended to be in the cosmetics business, but he feels that to be able to look someone in the eye and say, “We have the world’s best,” and mean it, may be the beginning of a whole new chapter in a long and fulfilled life. As grandma said to the bright eyed, mischievous child, “Anything worth doing is worth doing well.”
So what next for the irrepressible Montague-King? “More work, of course!” he says. And no small projects, either. He’s got the next 20 years mapped out already. “I want to form an international coalition of educators and scientists to help take skin care to the next level, both in the U.S. and all over the globe.” We might like to wish him luck… but no doubt he will not need it!

 



Read More
By | January 21, 2019
The life and achievements of skin treatment pioneer Danné Montague-King, are not easy to summarize. Where to start, after more than 40 years of research and travel, pioneering a skin revision methodology that for the most part was decades ahead of its time, and then to only now have his achievements recognized in his native U.S.?
From Russia to Tibet, Europe to Australia and beyond, Danné Montague-King has sought out knowledge in pursuit of his dream to bring aesthetic medicine and beauty therapy together. Long before cosmeceutical and para-medical became marketing buzz words, and long before Heads of State and members of royalty became believers, Danné was committed to hands-on research and hard work – wherever it took him. When asked how he managed to sustain such an incredible journey, this enigmatic man with the Peter Pan grin simply shrugs. “I just got on with it – and I had a lot of help!”
Top surgeons from Beverly Hills endorse his concepts, and his London Harley Street headquarters cater to a growing elite, but none of this has changed his fundamental attitude of always striving to know more and continually improve the treatments that he provides. “The press tries to capitalize on the glamorous aspects of my success, which can be annoying,” says Danné. “But it’s the skin revision work that’s most important to me.”
As far back as the early 1960s, this visionary in the alternative methods of natural pharmacology became aware that something was missing in the way skin care was being approached during that decade. Inspired to self-treat his own severe bouts of acne, Danné soon realized that human cells will not accept that which is either non-essential to their natural make up, or is not recognized as workable fuel. It was his first major discovery. “It took a lot of stumbling in the dark, but then the research started to pay off. I quickly saw how other skin conditions such as aging and the specific problems of ethnic skin could also be treated.”
His first stint in education was teaching skin revision in beauty schools around Chicago. These often had a large black student enrollment and he would regularly take the elevated trains out into the snow bound suburbs to reach them. In the 1970s there was very little in the way of aesthetician courses on offer – his syllabus was totally from his own mind – and the pay was minimal. The students were grateful and would take up a collection for him at the end of class, so that he could continue to teach them.
Years later, when he became friends with American icons Joel Gerson and Carol Walderman – both of whom were dedicated educators – Danné felt embarrassed that his early classes were not structured in the classic way of beauty therapy training. Ironically, both of these top professionals became supporters of his work. Obviously, results speak for themselves.
The Danné Montague-King story began a new chapter when he left Chicago for California to host a television series called Skin Deep. Here he also had the opportunity to set up a lab for continuing research, and for the production of tools that he believed were necessary to make his concepts available to everyone.
Danné has always maintained that products are over emphasized in aesthetics, being at best merely tools. Concept is everything is his life mantra. He stressed the need to look at skin in terms of functionality, structure, and hormonal fluctuation (for example, acne starting in the hypothalamus gland and cortisol levels contributed to many skin problems). He was the first scientist in his field to recognize the power of enzymes in skin treatment – and not enzymes in the products, but the idea of stimulating the many enzymes already in the skin and body, that orchestrate everything. “It’s really very easy to understand,” says Danné. “The human body is a bag of fluids containing a few chemicals that are orchestrated by enzymes and held together with electromagnetic waves. Simple!”
He created the now renowned Remove Rebuild Protect Maintain system, which has revolutionized the way aesthetics is being approached all over Europe, and particularly in China, Russia, and the Ukraine, where most of his colleagues are surgeons and dermatologists. It was his Chicago Black Skin researches that lead him to South Africa in the 1980s, long before apartheid was over. He received a commendation from Zulu King Buthelezi at Parliament House in Cape Town for his work with black people in townships and cities all over the country.
But his real expertise lay with journalism, through which he could enact his firm belief that knowledge should be shared. He was the first journalist to alert Europe and Asia to the powers of alpha hydroxy acids back in the days of the “Acid Reign” for professional application, and yet was the only person to caution against the use of AHAs in home products. A fact which did not make him popular with a lot of manufacturers at the time. Such is the price of commitment to one’s ideals.
It was also during this time that he formulated a topical analgesic based on cryotherapy that he called BIOFREEZE™, which is now one of the most famous products in the world. Selling out his interest and formula for BIOFREEZE™ several years ago allowed Danné to be more selective regarding who would represent his concepts. He could now devote time and energy to ensuring that high-level commitment, comprehensive research, and expert qualifications were attributes that became associated with his skin care treatments.
Danné strongly believes that there should be a positive working relationship between the medical fields and aesthetics professions. To achieve this, he has worked intensively with some of the world’s leading physicians and surgeons in the effort to elevate the importance of proper pre- and post-operative skin revision protocol, surgical alternatives, scar revision, and skin health maintenance for long term results.
As a shift in attitudes slowly took root overseas, Danné was there at the forefront. Whilst lecturing, at Cambridge in the UK, on the true meaning of para-medical, his candid scoffing at the term “cosmecuetical” – as being no more than a marketing device designed to influence the public into believing that products sold under this banner were medically or pharmaceutically enhanced – earned him an invitation to lecture at The Royal Academy of Medicine in London, a stiff upper lip institute that had previously looked down on beauty therapy as playing around. Then in 2009, Danné’s long time educator in the UK, Susan Williams, was invited by the Academy to be a member, a rare first for an aesthetician who was not a doctor of medicine. This was in recognition of her efforts in bridging the gap between aesthetics and medicine in hospitals, clinics, and surgeries throughout Great Britain. “I am extremely proud of her,” says Danné.
Danné is a tireless educator. He annually travels around the world, conducting lectures to professionals and consumers alike. An invited guest speaker at many exhibitions, Danné has become a well-known figure within CIDESCO and BABTEC. Several years ago, Baljeet Suri, owner of The Ray Cochran School of Beauty in London, and a CIDESCO board member, asked Danné to participate in the upgrading and revision of the CIDESCO syllabus – which was nearly 200 years old! “I was flattered,” says Danné, “but I realized such a body of work would require a full time commitment, so I had to decline. My grandmother’s credo of anything worth doing is worth doing well, was ringing in my head.”
As one of the most published aesthetic journalists in the world, Danné Montague-King is a regular contributor to many of the world’s most important professional magazines, including Professional Beauty in four countries, Les Nouvelles Esthetiques, Health and Beauty, Skjonnet og Helse, Australian Beauty Therapy, Beauty New Zealand, Medi Spa Canada, and Irish Beauty. Although his articles can be heavily scientific, his inspirational use of analogies, combined with wit and humor, has created a loyal fan base. At a recent magazine gala on the Thames, he was approached by an enthusiastic therapist from Iceland who hugged him and said, “I never buy anything until I first see what you have to say about it!”
Anyone who has met Danné or listened to one of his lectures will understand why he has become such a popular figure in the media. Some say he epitomizes male vanity, but few will ever say he looks bad. His strong personality is balanced by his knowledge of the industry and his controversial willingness to contradict many of the ways people think within it, which defines him as a truly committed and unique individual.
Over the years, he has been interviewed by many of the top television and radio personalities – including stateside with Geraldo Rivera – and by journalists for magazines such as Marie Claire, Cosmo, Elle, Vogue, and Tattler. European Vogue once ran an article entitled “Derm War Fares,” which listed Danné Montague-King as one of the top five skin specialists in the world – an accolade he has laughed off. “Pure hype! I am only a wild ham cavorting on a field of corn with a message to get out to professionals.” Even with all his successes, Danné does not like to take credit for his vision. “I have never created anything,” he often says. “Nature sets up the rules. A true scientist must first think abstractly, without tunnel vision. All of the premier scientists of the 19th and 20th centuries that gave us telephones and air flight, indeed, pioneers of nearly everything we enjoy today, were ordinary men. Most were without formal educations or degrees, researching simply because they were curious, had imagination, listened to their own hearts, and followed the dictates of nature and the far off music of the universe.” He lays the accolades of success for his skin revision concepts at the feet of the many “giants of science and medicine” who have contributed to his message. But in the end, Danné Montague-King somehow had the loudest voice!
Danné turns 67 this month, but feels no trepidation about getting older. Just like the ancient Chinese, he believes that, “We are born and then we die. What happens in-between is up to us!” And there is certainly no letting up on the in-between, either. Currently, he has assembled a team of experts to bring to the world the finest makeup foundation ever created. It is a dream that Danné has always wanted to turn into reality. “This has been on my mind for a long time,” he says. “For many years, patients at our clinics would ask me about what kind of makeup they should use after their acne or rosacea treatments. I would simply recommend what I knew to be the least harmful. But I always had other ideas in mind. I wanted to formulate a base that covers everything, even scars and tattoos, and that has no heavy oils, lasts all day long, doesn’t rub off on clothing, and yet looks like natural skin in the broadest daylight. A makeup foundation that is not detrimental to the health of skin.”
And this dream has nearly come to fruition, with the makeup range slated for launch in early 2010. Danné never intended to be in the cosmetics business, but he feels that to be able to look someone in the eye and say, “We have the world’s best,” and mean it, may be the beginning of a whole new chapter in a long and fulfilled life. As grandma said to the bright eyed, mischievous child, “Anything worth doing is worth doing well.”
So what next for the irrepressible Montague-King? “More work, of course!” he says. And no small projects, either. He’s got the next 20 years mapped out already. “I want to form an international coalition of educators and scientists to help take skin care to the next level, both in the U.S. and all over the globe.” We might like to wish him luck… but no doubt he will not need it!


Read More
By | January 21, 2019

Does your spa pass the “white glove” test? With today’s emphasis on good hygiene and the battle against infection and diseases, society has become more conscious about cleanliness: We take a shower every day; we put on clean clothes; we clean our homes; we wash our cars, inside and out. So, why should spa-goers not expect to have a clean and sanitary environment in our spas, nail salons, hair salons, or facial studios? As the saying goes, “Cleanliness is next to Godliness.” As business owners of spas, salons, or studios we need to attract new clients and maintain the clients we have. We want our clients to feel safe, comfortable, nurtured, and clean.

Spa sanitation is a critical issue that continuously needs to be discussed. The simplest way to review techniques is to go back to the basics: Cleaning, drying and disinfecting are the first steps in proper sanitation of all areas of the spa. The most basic of all principles is that every employee on the staff must wash his or her hands frequently with soap and warm water for 20 seconds, being sure to scrub all areas, rinse thoroughly, and pat dry. The general cleansing ingredients found in soap and antibacterial hand soap will remove most bacteria from your hands. 
General cleaning of the facility is a basic necessity. You only have one opportunity to make a first impression, so make it a clean one. The front door should be washed frequently and should be free from fingerprints. The reception area should be neat and free from dust. The reception desk should be neat and professional with no cigarettes or ashtrays, and no unnecessary items. The telephone is the one item that breeds germs and should be cleaned frequently. The magazines should be neatly stacked or placed orderly in a rack; old issues or torn magazines should be discarded. Display racks or shelving should be free from dust and fingerprints. The pictures on the wall should be straight and free from dust; the walls and ceiling should have a clean appearance with no scratches, scrapes, or peeling, and should be free from cobwebs and dust webs. 
For general cleaning use a natural antibacterial, antiviral, and antifungal product that kills germs like MRSA, Influenza A (H1N1), Staph, Salmonella, and E. Coli on contact. You want a product that contains no caustic chemicals that would irritate the skin or omit an offensive smell. This product can be used to kill germs in many areas of the spa, especially on frequently used public items like telephones and doorknobs, which never seem to be addressed and are the most active carriers of germs.
Other adequate disinfectants are isopropyl alcohol (70 – 90 percent solution), ethyl alcohol (70 – 90 percent solution), Clorox solution, and white vinegar. Each has its positive and negative qualities. Spray bottles containing disinfectants must be freshly prepared everyday. Keep a logbook to record the freshness. Candace Griesel, Proprietor of La Bella Vita Studio, a quaint little spa in New Hope, Pa., tries to stay “Green” in her spa and disinfects with white vinegar. Candace says, “Dilute and wipe all surfaces with white vinegar. It is a natural product that leaves a clean scent and no film.” She also uses a medical grade disinfectant to disinfect all of her stainless steel implements and places them under a UV light after washing the implements.
Another important area of the spa that must frequently be monitored for its cleanliness is the bathroom. Clients want to walk into a clean, sanitary bathroom. Clients are the biggest culprits in contaminating bathrooms by leaving the vanity wet or paper towels and toilet tissue dragging on the floor. A spa staff member should frequently inspect and tidy the bathroom. At the end of each day the bathroom should be cleaned and sanitized.

Floors should be kept clean and free of hair, paper, and debris throughout the day. In the evening, the floors, including the corners, should be thoroughly cleaned and sanitized. A bi-monthly deep cleaning or waxing is also recommended. The spa should record these scheduled cleanings. Dust and dry-mop all walls and ceilings at least once a week, but check daily for uninvited guests, such as spiders building a home. Ingredients for disaster are dark and damp environments; this could mean the heating and cooling units. These units should be serviced, and the filters must be changed on a regular basis, perhaps quarterly, as well as the heating and cooling vents. The vents could harbor bacteria, mold, and fungus, which could cause respiratory ailments.

Make sure to clean and sanitize your washing machine and dryer, as well as keep your refrigerator clean and free of spoiled food. Wipe appliances with a disinfectant. You may want to consider a filtered water system for your spa or salon, which could prevent the build up of minerals on showerheads and drains. All spa piping and drainage pipes in wet areas should be cleaned monthly, and all drains should always be free from collected hair and debris.
Pat Plover, owner of Serendipity Spa and Wellness Center, Souderton, Pa. writes: “ ‘Your spa is always so clean’ is one of the nicest compliments I receive from clients. It reinforces to me as the owner that offering a comfortable and clean environment where clients can enjoy their spa services is just as important as the services we provide.” When providing services such as massage, skin care, and nail services, Plover believes it is critical that good sanitation procedures are always followed. She adds: “Businesses always look for the niche that makes them stand apart from the others and here at Serendipity Spa & Wellness Center we feel that we achieved that distinction. From the moment
you enter our doors you see a very clean and comfortable welcoming environment that puts new and existing clients at ease.” Plover feels the old adage “You only get one chance to make a first impression” is more important than ever! She is confident that a good first impression may also turn into a returning client. She states: “A clean and sanitary environment is not just a good idea, it is critical to your success!”

Individual staff members need to take pride in their facial and massage cabins, nail and hair areas, and other treatment rooms for waxing and wraps. After each treatment all hard surfaces should be wiped clean with a disinfectant. Clean, disinfect, and store tools and implements in a clean, dry storage container or cabinet. Sheets and towels should be changed. Let each client feel that they are the first client of the day.

Pedicure units and chairs should be cleaned and disinfected after every service. In some states it is required to keep a journal of proper cleaning and dates of service. All motorized and pipeless jets need to be deep cleaned by filling the basin with warm water, including a half cup Clorox and one application of antibacterial dish detergent. Run jets for 20 minutes, then drain. Fill unit again with warm water and run jets for 10 minutes to rinse. Drain, wipe dry, and spray with a disinfectant. Nail care tools
that cannot be sterilized, including nail files, porous buffing stones, and toe separators should be disposed of or given to the individual client to take home.

All implements must be properly disposed of or sterilized. Wash all implements in warm water with an antibacterial soap, rinse, and air dry.

Use an EPA-medical grade disinfectant with bacterial, fungicidal, and virucidal properties. Ultraviolet light cabinets are not suitable replacement for liquid disinfectant solutions. These can be used for storage after properly cleaning and disinfecting. Wet sanitizers like Barbicide should be changed daily. You should replace the bulbs on a dry sanitizer according to the manufacturer’s recommendations.
After each treatment the hot wax container or pot should be cleaned, and the surrounding tabletop should be sterilized. Dispose of applicators and waxing material.
If you own a spa that launders your own linens, including sheets and towels, take special care not to overload the washing machine. Your sheets should be free of stains, tears, and offensive smells. If the sheets smell rancid, then you need to change your massage oil. Choose a water-soluble oil. This type of oil washes clean from sheets and towels. Be aware that sheets coated with oil could ignite a dryer fire. Sheets should be neatly folded and stacked in an enclosed shelf, or in a cabinet, and not open on a shelf to collect dust. Sheets rolled in a ball are unacceptable. Blankets, duvets, comforters, bolsters, and pillows should have a washable cover or should be laundered after each client if they come in direct contact with the client.
The most controversy about cleaning occurs with massage stones in spas. Massage stones are valuable tools used by massage therapists, aestheticians, reflexologists, and nail technicians. With more than 13 years of experience teaching seminars in many modalities for stone therapies, we recommend washing the stones after each use in hot water with an antibacterial dish detergent. They should then be rinsed, air-dried, and sprayed with a disinfectant like alcohol. The water in the massage stone heater should be changed after each use and the water reservoir should be washed with soap and water, rinsed, and sprayed with disinfectant as well. The mat or towel that is at the bottom of the water reservoir in the heater must be replaced with a clean one.
Cleaning of the stones and heater is made easier by using the proper lubricant. You should not use a cream, lotion, gel, or heavy oil like jojoba. While these products are great to massage with, they are too heavy for stone massage and tend to stick to the stones and heater surface. They are difficult to remove, even with scrubbing, and aid in harboring bacteria. The therapist should use light oil that is water-soluble, that will wash off stones and heaters easily without scrubbing.
Many therapists think that if they do not put the stones back in the water, they do not have to change the water each time. This is not the best practice. Each time you reach your hand into the water you contaminate it. In addition, water grows bacteria even when it is still. As a result, the water in the heater must be changed after each treatment.
Joanne Graves, owner of My Sanctuary Spa and Salon in Wilmington, Del. says, “Sanitation is vital. Your clients trust you to provide them with a safe, clean, environment.” To support her statement, after each client Graves requires her nail technicians to dispose of all nail files, wipe the pedicure chair, and thoroughly sanitize the pedicure basin. She further states, “I am not confident sponges can be completely sanitized so we send them home with each client.” As for her floors, she requires her massage therapists and aestheticians to spray the floor with Isopropyl Alcohol 70 percent and Swiffer mop them to kill any possible germs that could be transferred from bare feet.
After a review of your spa, would it pass the “white glove” test? A clean, healthy, sanitized spa is as important as the services you offer.

Lynne Zsido owns and operates Park Avenue Salon and Spa in Hershey, Pa.. Lynne has extensive experience in innovative product and treatment design, incorporating “green” initiatives in her work. With over 25 years in the Day Spa, Resort Spa industry, Lynne’s work has been seen in one of Americas top theme resort spas, “The Spa at the Hotel Hershey.” She understands the importance of educating men and women on the benefits of cutting edge treatments. Her artistic flare makes Lynne a perfect spa owner.
www.parkavenuesalonadnspa.com

Pat Mayrhofer is president and founder of Nature’s Stones Inc., an international massage-stone, education and supply company. She is a massage therapist with more than 15 years of experience, having taught for 13 of those years in Italy, Austria, the Dominican Republic, and the U.S. Mayrhofer and her staff have created a comprehensive series of live, hands-on training programs, educational DVDs available for distance learning and a line of associated stone and textile products. For more information, visit
www.naturestonesinc.com.



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By | January 21, 2019

How does an aesthetician or therapist determine a recommendation for a body treatment for their guest? Which one works best: Body scrubs, polish, glow, gommage, or chemical peels therapies for an exfoliation treatment that will also soothe, nourish, protocols… how is one to choose? Salt or sugar?  Mud or seaweed? The good news is there is not really a wrong choice – just a more qualified choice for the client Spa guests need education on the value of the services offered, for them to know the importance of each. Most spas fail to promote the only body treatment. While massage is an important aspect or body treatment, there are so many opportunities to treat, heal, spoil, pampers and give the client a wonderful experience with a body treatment.

Exfoliation has been used since ancient times, through different cultures. Indians used spices to exfoliate their body, while the Polynesians used seashells. Other indigenous cultures used grain meals, dried herbs, and plants. Exfoliation smoothes and softens the skin by sloughing off the uppermost dead layer of the skin. By removing the dead layer of skin, products can work more effectively and the skin functions better. Normal skin cells divide, moving to the surface every 28 days. By working with the body and having clients receive a body exfoliation, it assists with detoxification, improves product performance, and is excellent for the skin. Ideally, body exfoliation or skin brushing should be done weekly. There are various types of exfoliation that can be offered at the spa:

  • dry skin brushing
  • loofah and gloves
  • salt glow and sugar scrubs
  • gommage
  • machines
  • chemical

Skin brushing is one of the simplest of all spa exfoliation treatments that a therapist can give. Traditionally, the Scandinavians practiced a daily ritual of taking a brush and gently brushing their skin. Before brushing your hair or teeth in the morning, brush your skin using a soft, dry, skin brush, preferably with natural bristles. This daily ritual is invigorating and will stimulate the lymphatic system.
As a spa treatment, this will be an excellent opportunity to educate the client to the importance of skin brushing and how it can be done daily at home. Encourage the guest to become involved with a home maintenance program and to purchase a natural bristle brush. Or offer a gift with purchase and with the service, the guest receives their own brush, which in turn will give them the confidence that the brush hasn't been used on any other clients. Plus, guests like having something to go home with and every time they use that item they will think of the wonderful experience they had at your spa. This gentle reminder will hopefully give them the desire to want to rebook and revisit the spa. If you are reusing the brushes make sure you clean them with soap and water after each use, then soak them in bleach or EPA/hospital grade disinfectant for 20 minutes; or follow the manufacturers instructions to properly disinfect the brush between uses.
For therapists giving a dry brush service, always work towards the heart and where possible follow the direction of lymph flow with your strokes. Use brisk strokes and have them overlap slightly and with the other hand follow the brush in a rhythmic motion. Which ever hand that you write with, hold the brush with that same hand. Follow with other hand as you will have more control. This rhythm should be gentle stroke with the brush followed by effleurage strokes with the other hand. This is a more nurturing style and pressure can be used on more callused areas of the body such as the bottoms of feet, knees, and elbows. Using two brushes – while for some might seem better, quicker, and receive more results – is in fact counter productive as it may be uncomfortable and hurt the guest. Less is more with this exfoliation. The therapist does not want to bruise or scrape the client's skin or apply too much pressure, which can cause capillaries to break.
For additional benefits, offer aroma-dry brushing therapy. Have three essential oils and have the client choose their favorite. Essential oils that would be good to have available would be ones that increase circulation such as juniper, geranium, ginger, lavender, and rosemary. Apply it to the bristles of the brushes and start brushing that dead skin away. Remember to start with the feet and work towards the heart. Have the client turn over and repeat the application on their other side. When working on the abdomen, work in clockwise motion and very gentle as clients may be ticklish or sensitive.
Wet scrubs with a loofah or exfoliating gloves is considered a mechanical exfoliation that can be used with our without the loofah or gloves. This treatment is different from the dry body brushing as it is performed wet and the client will experience erythema. This erythema or pinkness on the skin is a good indication of increased circulation.

  1. The therapist will want to prepare the treatment table with a towel under the client for extra absorption of the water.
  2. The loofah or gloves will be dampened and have a body gel cleanser available.
  3. Heat the skin by applying hot towel compresses over the area you are going to start working. In most cases it will be the feet and legs. Place warm towels over both legs and press down firmly. Remove towels.
  4. Apply a body gel cleanser in the loofah or gloves and start to effleurage and exfoliate towards the heart. Again, work with one loofah/glove and have the other hand free to keep contact with the client, working up the body following the glove.
  5. This will ensure client comfort and not overexfoliation and irritation to skin.
  6. Once the skin is pink, place a warm towel over the feet and legs to remove excess cleanser and apply a dry, warm towel.
    Continue to abdomen, hands, and arms and have client turn over and repeat process.

The goal of this service is for exfoliation, but ensure that the client is warm and do not let them get chilled. Additional, hydration can follow with an application of a body moisturizer.
Salt glows or sugar scrubs are another form of a mechanical exfoliation. Make sure that all the salt or sugar is removed from the body before continuing onto further treatments as to not cause irritation. Choosing salt over another ingredient is key in detoxification treatments. Salt is preferred for the male guests as they enjoy a more vigorous exfoliation. If your female guest has recently shaved, salt will irritate and not feel good. In that case, offer another exfoliation service such as a sugar scrub. Dead sea salt is a great choice for this service as it will give additional benefits beyond just exfoliation.
Gommage style treatments use sloughing off creams or masks that are applied to the skin and allowed to dry slightly before buffing off, using a rolling method of your hands. This treatment leaves the skin beautifully smooth and fine. It can be used as a singular treatment as it acts as a mask and exfoliant all in one. It can be time consuming when removing, but also can be seen as a time saver for clients who need to be in and out in a short. Apply the gommage with a large body brush in firm, upward, long strokes covering the entire body but avoiding the breast area. Once the mask has dried, remove by sloughing off and laying warm, wet towels onto the client to remove excess. This can be followed by body moisturizer, gel, or oil to hydrate the skin again. The therapist should take special consideration since the gommage is messy and to try to keep it on the towels so the floor isn't covered in product.
Machines are excellent to use when you don't want the mess that a scrub or polish can sometimes leave behind. Using machines gives you the opportunity to introduce equipment to a hesitant client unsure about having a service on their face. The choices include a rotary brush, microdermabrasion, and now the very popular ultrasound spatula.
Exfoliation has come a long way and does more than just slough off dead skin. For savvy aestheticians who want to offer a very effective exfoliation service that will treat unwanted hyperpigmentation, peels for the body are the answer. It is well known that chemical peels on the face are extremely effective in reducing hyperpigmentation but clients now want to remove sun damage from their hands, arms, décolleté, and even legs. Body chemical peels may be a slightly stronger concentration than chemical peels used for the face, because body chemical peels are intended to treat areas of skin more resistant to treatment. Proper knowledge of the manufacturer's protocols are needed when working with chemical peels and always have the client fill out a history form prior to any service. Body peels are most effective when sold in a series.
Body peels are not just for hyperpigmentation according to Krista Bourne, aesthetician and aesthetics education director for Epionce Skin Care. Bourne recommends doing a thorough analysis of the body and to look for Keratosis Pilaris. A large percentage of individuals, more women than men, suffer from a benign genetic condition called Keratosis Pilaris (KP). KP is characterized by small, skin colored-to-reddish, rough bumps that appear on the cheeks (on children and pre-teens), on the back of upper arms, and/or on the back of thighs and buttocks. It is caused by hyperkeratinization (excess keratin) which forms a plug in the hair follicle. There are actually three different forms of KP, including Keratosis Pilaris Rubra (red, inflamed bumps), Keratosis Pilaris Alba (rough bumps with no irritation), and Keratosis Pilaris Rubra Faceii (red, rash-like bumps on the face). KP may sometimes be confused with folliculitis, which is an inflamed infection of the hair follicle caused by staphylococcus bacteria. If you feel your client may have folliculitis and not KP, keep within your scope of practice as an aesthetician and refer to a physician for diagnosis and treatment.
Generally, KP is more of a cosmetic nuisance, but it can be treated with regular gentle exfoliation treatments to help improve the appearance. Effective professional treatments with ingredients to combat KP is with a combination of beta hydroxy acids and alpha hydroxy acids. After cleansing the skin twice using a gel cleanser and a soft brush, apply one to three layers of your favorite peel. The very last step is to apply sunscreen, formulated with micronized zinc oxide for UVA/UVB protection.
Bourne recommends that the client take care of their skin at home, with products that help reduce redness and inflammation, smooth skin texture, and keep the pores clean, along with a barrier repair product that helps balance the lipid ratios in the stratum corneum. Excellent ingredients to look for in retail products are formulated with salicylic and azelaic acids, a great mixture of antioxidants including date palm extract and rose hips, and barrier strengthening ingredients such as meadowfoam, flax, and avocado. A series is recommended for better results, coupled with a good home care regimen.
Exfoliation of the skin of the body is an important therapy offered at spas. By removing the dead cell buildup and prepping the skin, it will prepare the body for additional services. It is an excellent opportunity to teach clients about how the skin cells divide, and if they wish to work with their body, the client needs to have a professional body exfoliating treatment at least every 28 days. Body exfoliation is easy, enjoyable, and effective for clients and profitable for the spa.

Denise R. Fuller is a licensed aesthetician and a certified body wrapping instructor in the state of Florida. Fuller is a trained Australian beauty therapist, a published author, and an AIA Ambassador. www.denisefuller.biz, drfjetset@yahoo.com

 

 



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By | January 21, 2019

In the professional skin care industry, people are modifying and changing treatments every day to improve the benefits and lessen the contraindications. All over the world, visitors go to spas and request "your most popular treatment." But have you ever wondered what all the other spa's most popular treatments are? Have you ever compared the others to your own? When deciding the theme for this month's special section, treatments around the world deemed appropriate. When reading about ethnic skin and how to effectively treat different skin types, you should also be thinking about the treatments your spa currently offers. Do you offer treatments that will appeal to all ethnicities? Across the next few pages, you will find countries across the world that show one of their most popular treatments – and explain why it works for them. It is very important to understand the needs and wants of your clients – and then provide for them

Lomi Lomi facial
Our Lomi Lomi facial is the signature treatment offered at Na Ho'ola Spa. We use the Eminence organic skin care line in the facial and customize it to meet the needs of each guest. The treatment begins with heated, smooth lava stones being placed in the client's palms and wrapped with ti-leaves. This calms the body and the soul as you begin the treatment. Our aestheticians cleanse and exfoliate with a rotary brush, use a high frequency module, and select the appropriate mask to re-hydrate your skin. Extractions are done before the start of the Lomi Lomi face massage which lasts about 10 to 12 minutes. A décolleté, arm, and hand massage accompanies the treatment.

What are the benefits of this treatment for the client?
We provide the guest with a longer facial massage. All movements are done in series of threes; these are in reference to the mind, body, and soul. The focus of the treatment is to revive the dermis, especially due to the amount of sun exposure here in Hawaii.

What are the contraindications to the client during this treatment?
None. We customize the treatment to meet the skin needs of the guest and through consultation find out if they have any allergies.

What supplies are needed for the aesthetician to perform this treatment?
We use steam and a multi-function facial unit.

Is there any form of education that is needed by the aesthetician before performing this treatment on the client?
All of our aestheticians have a Hawaii State Beauty Operator License which is obtained through completing a 600-hour course and passing the Hawaii state licensing exam.

Why is this treatment popular in your country?
Our guests are always looking to experience a Hawaiian influenced treatment. Though skin care was not a point of emphasis in the Hawaiian culture, overall health and wellness was very important. All training techniques have been passed down over generations, so the Hawaiian influence of this treatment holds great spiritual belief to the therapists. Combined with the rich history of the land that our spa is situated on, this treatment provides our guests with a perfect blend of ancient technique and modern skin care products.

Theapeutic Mar Menor Mud
The Mar Menor Mud Wrap is a treatment that is designed to treat both the face and body. Mar Menor mud is applied all over the body. The client is then covered with an insulating layer, for 15 to 20 minutes to ensure the maximum benefit from the properties of the mud. During this time, the face is cleansed and toned. Prior to the application of a mud mask, the face is draped with a warm towel. This is left for five minutes while a foot massage is performed. The mask is removed and an aloe moisturizer is applied. The client is helped to the shower and the treatment is finished with an application of aloe body lotion.

What are the benefits of this treatment for the client?
Mar Menor Mud is packed with minerals and oligoelements from the Mediterranean "Mar Menor" sea; it nourishes and hydrates all types of skin, soothes and calms aching joints, and is highly recommended for skin conditions such as psoriasis, eczema, acne, rosacea, etc. As it can be applied warm, it is also very relaxing.

What are the contraindications to the client during this treatment?
It is not recommended for pregnant women during the first 16 weeks of pregnancy. It cannot be applied on open wounds. If the client is claustrophobic, the Mar Menor mud may still be applied, but it is best not to wrap the client, therefore the maximum benefit will not be obtained.

What supplies are needed for the aesthetician to perform this treatment?
The aesthetician should have both large and small towels, a plastic sheet, cotton discs, face cleanser and toner, Aloe Vera moisturizer and body lotion, and Mar Menor Mud.

Is there any form of education that is needed by the aesthetician before performing this treatment on the client?
Even though the treatment is simple, the aesthetician needs to be trained on how to prepare the Mar Menor mud. This comes as a powder so the aesthetician needs to know the proportion of water to powder and the quantity required.

Why is this treatment popular in your country?
The mud that is found on the Mar Menor Sea has long been renowned for its healing properties. Traditionally, it was applied on the beach, dried by the sun, and rinsed off in the sea. Nowadays it is safer and more effective to have the treatment in a salon as the product has had all impurities removed and the mineral content and hygiene standard is constant. The Mar Menor treatment can be enjoyed by people of all ages and skin types, immediately bringing relief to sore muscles, aching joints, and skin problems.

Turkish Body Scrub
The main room consists of a raised marble platform that graces the centre of the hammam and is known as the Navel Stone. The Navel Stone is positioned above the wood or coal furnace that heats the hammam and its surface temperature can range from warm to hot depending on the guest's desired temperature. The guest lies on the Naval Stone for a vigorous massage, after which the masseur bathes the guest with warm water and soap.

What are the benefits of this treatment for the client?
Made famous in the Byzantine and Roman periods, the hammam, or Turkish bath, is a luxurious experience to refresh and purify mind, body, and soul. The steam in the hammam softens the skin in preparation for exfoliation and massage. This process cleanses the body of dead skin cells and revitalizes the skin, as well as accelerates blood circulation and encourages the process of skin cell renewal.

What are the contraindications to the client during this treatment?
Contraindications include allergies, pregnancy, heart conditions, and high blood pressure.

What supplies are needed for the aesthetician to perform this treatment?
The masseur who gives the bath uses a rough cloth glove and Turkish black olive soap to massage the guest, providing a deep cleansing. Once the treatment is complete, the hammams provide you with special towels called pestemal in Turkish.

Is there any form of education that is needed by the aesthetician before performing this treatment on the client?
The masseur needs to have specialized training in different forms of scrubbing and massage.

Why is this treatment popular in your country?
Although hammams have lost their social status among many locals, they are still considered points of interest for visitors. Istanbul's public hammams are very special buildings dating back to the Ottoman period. In addition to their intended aim, hammams play an important role as places of social gathering and ritual cleansing, as well as architectural structures and institutions with special customs. Hammams are places of attraction during such ceremonies as weddings and a traditional place of entertainment during holidays. If you are visiting Istanbul, it is highly recommended that you partake in the unique hammam experience.

The Aromasoul Mediterranean Ritual Massage
The Aromasoul Mediterranean Ritual Massage is a reflection of the energetic spirit and warmth of the Mediterranean cultures, enhanced with the essence of the ocean… fluidity, restoration, and relaxation. The hands of the therapist dance like the waves, in a sweet and nurturing caress that encourages a profound sense of well-being. Fluid movement is the key. The hands move with fluidity and grace, the body moves in the same way, observant of the breath of both the giver and recipient. Olive seed particles are used to exfoliate the body, followed by a steam and a shower, then a massage using a Mediterranean blend of oils.

What are the benefits of the treatment?
The body exfoliation used is to stimulate blood circulation, sloughs off dead skin cells, and promote better penetration of the products to follow by a massage using blends of oil to improve fluidity, restoration, and relaxation.

What are the contraindications to the client during this treatment?
You should not perform this treatment on clients who are pregnant, who have diabetes or high blood pressure, or who have had chemotherapy treatment in the last six months.

What supplies are needed for the aesthetician to perform this treatment?
Our aestheticians use Aromasoul Mediterranean Olive Scrub, Aromasoul Ritual Cream Base, Aromasoul Nourishing Massage Oil, and Aromasoul Mediterranean Blend.

Is there any form of education that is needed by the aesthetician before performing this treatment on the client?
You must be a qualified body therapist and have training at Comfort Zone. Qualification needed is through an ITech or CIDESCO diploma.

Why is this treatment popular in your country?
Due to the climate, water, hectic lifestyle, and pollution in South Africa, our clients suffer from very dry and dehydrated skin during all seasons. The Aromasoul Mediterranean Ritual Massage not only leaves the body feeling revitalized and restored, but also has an effect on the mind, body, and soul. The hands of the therapist create a lasting memorable experience for our guests.

The Fango Natural Mud
Before the guest arrives at the spa, the spa employee will mix the mud with warm water. Then we ask the guest to first take a shower and use the steam room for about five minutes. We then let the guest lie facing down and cover the body with mud, using the hands. After covering the client's back and legs, we wrap the body with a towel for 10 minutes. Afterwards, we start to remove the mud using a small, dry towel, stroking in upwards movements. When finished, we perform the same treatment on the front half of the body. Lastly, we ask the guest to take another shower and use the steam room for 10 minutes.

What are the benefits of this treatment for the client?
The Fango Natural Mud is for all different skin types: normal, dry, oily, and sensitive. It helps to smooth and moisturize the skin, while exfoliating and deep cleansing. It also has very immediate results, which is what makes this treatment perfect for the skin.

What are the contraindications for the client during this treatment?
There are some contraindications such as body allergy to the mud on the skin.

What supplies are needed for the aesthetician to perform this treatment?
We use mud, water, and towels. The client also takes a shower before and after the treatment, and uses a steam room.

Is there any form of education that is needed by the aesthetician before performing this treatment on the client?
Anybody who works in the spa can perform massage and the body treatment. There are no special needs of education other than having to learn in the physical academy for four years to study the muscles and the body's anatomy.

Why is this treatment popular in your country?
This treatment is popular because it's the ancient Egyptian experience. Egyptians used to spend many hours pampering and treating their bodies with delightful oils and creams. Both men and women restore vitality and good health with this treatment.

Traditional Russian Bath
Our Russian bath treatment combines national traditions with a modern art of spa-beauty and cosmetology. The Original Russian bath treatment begins with a sauna and a massage with selection of branches (oak, birch, or eucalyptus). Time in the sauna and dipping into the plunge pool allows you to relieve stress and discomfort. This treatment is followed by a full body peeling on a warm marble table and a honey mask. The procedure ends by indulging your skin with a relaxing soap massage. The therapist will ease your tired body and improve your skin balance.

What are the benefits of this treatment for the client?
This treatment helps to relieve stress and discomfort.

What are the contraindications to the client during this treatment?
The contraindications for this treatment are fever, bleeding, skin infections, high or low blood pressure, ischemic disease, period, and late months of pregnancy.

What supplies are needed for the aesthetician to perform this treatment?
The aesthetician should have bunches of oak, birch, or eucalyptus branches, as well as the ingredients for a honey mask.

Is there any form of education that is needed by the aesthetician before performing this treatment on the client?
An aesthetician needs special training to conduct this treatment.

Why is this treatment popular in your country?
This is a traditional treatment that has been used in Russia long before the popularity of spas. It is a relaxing and stress relieving procedure that tones up the whole body leaving you refreshed.

Shirodhara
"Shiro" means 'head' and "Dhara" means 'flow'. Shirodhara treatment starts with a gentle head massage then warm oil is poured in an even stream onto the forehead and the third eye chakra in between the brow. The treatment is performed by two people, one to control the movement and flow of the oil and other maintains the temperature of the oil through out the treatment.

What are the benefits of this treatment for the client?
This treatment balances doshas (body's imbalances as per Ayurveda) of the body, relaxes the nervous system, and is helpful in insomnia and headaches.

What are the contraindications to the client during this treatment?
The client should not have this treatment performed if they are pregnant, have fever, have extreme weakness, or when recovering from recent sickness.

What supplies are needed for the aesthetician to perform this treatment?
The aesthetician will need a Shirodhara pot and stand, an Ayurvedic massage bed or alternative arrangement to collect the oil, and equipment to warm the oil.

Is there any form of education that is needed by the aesthetician before performing this treatment on the client?
Knowledge of Ayurvedic massage and understanding of principles of Ayurveda is an advantage when learning Shirodhara treatment.

Why is this treatment popular in your country?
Vietnam is gradually developing as a spa destination and due to its proximity to Thailand where Ayurvedic massages have been performed for a long time the local and international traveler is becoming more aware of the benefits of such treatments and they are becoming more popular in Vietnam. The calming and healing benefits of this treatment is making it popular.

Korean Massage
The Korean Massage is based on stimulating Kyung-Rak (Meredian Pathways), which helps to circulate body system and to make the bones and joints stronger and smoother. Therapists use their fists and elbows with strong pressure to stimulate the body. The technique relieves the edema from bad blood circulation. It is recommended to people who have muscular pain around neck and shoulder.

What are the benefits of this treatment for the client?
It gives the client better blood circulation, relieves the stress, and detoxifies the body.

What are the contraindications to the client during this treatment?
We explain that depends on client's body, extravagated blood arise. Normally it goes away in a day or two. It is not recommended for anyone who has diabetes or heart problems. Also for those who had a meal within two hours.

What supplies are needed for the aesthetician to perform this treatment?
The therapist uses sweet Almond oil during the massage and sometimes uses a specially designed dish for better results. But, international guests think that is too new and scary. Therapists at Park Club use their fists and elbows with Swedish massage techniques to fit their needs.

Is there any form of education that is needed by the aesthetician before performing this treatment on the client?
The massage does not require any additional education, other than that learned in school.

Why is this treatment popular in your country?
Koreans prefer strong massage pressure in general. International guests coming to the Park Club would like to get a different type of massage and they think 'Korean Massage' sounds exotic. But, if they prefer light and smooth pressure, we do not recommend it.

Body Envelopment Treatment
Balinese Boreh is a form of traditional exfoliation and body wrap remedy among the Balinese royalties for centuries. Boreh stimulates metabolism due to its spice base and relieves aching muscles and joints. Because it encourages body warmth, the Boreh is also good for relieving headaches and preventing colds. It is believed to help rejuvenate skins cells by exfoliating the dead skin cells during the application process. It also promotes skin rejuvenation and moisture balance by keeping the moisture of the skin long after the treatments due to the moisturizing nature of the Boreh recipe.

What are the benefits of this treatment for the client?
It's perfect for relief of muscular aches, toning of the tissues, and deep internal cleansing. It activates circulation, increases metabolism, and induces perspiration to assist the body in detoxifying itself. It includes herbal powders of clove, cinnamon, and ginger in a base of kimiri nut – candle nut, for warming the muscles, reduce aches, and enhance full body detoxification through its heating property.

What are the contraindications to the client during this treatment?
The client should not have the Body Envelopment Treatment if they are allergic to the product, have any heart conditions, have very high or low blood pressure, fever, epilepsy, or claustrophobia.

What supplies are needed for the aesthetician to perform this treatment?
You will need disposable underwear, cool face towels and hot towels, a large mixing bowl for Boreh mask powder, a body brush, and a plastic sheet cut to size.

Is there any form of education that is needed by the aesthetician before performing this treatment on the client?
Yes. The therapist should be trained for at least 20 hours in this treatment, including class room and
practical sessions.

Why is this treatment popular in your country?
It is a traditional treatment based on indigenous recipes handed down through generations. The locals use this treatment as a lifestyle and as a preventive treatment to keep the body healthy and fit. It is believed that Boreh also relieves muscle pain, reduces fat, and supposed to be an excellent stress buster after a long hard working day.

Swedish Massage with a Touch of New Zealand
Upon arrival, the client will receive a locker, a robe, and a pair of slippers to prepare for her treatment. Then she will personally be guided to the Relaxation area, offered water, and asked to fill out a client history form. The treatment begins with a consultation and aromatherapy foot soak ritual. Once the client's needs are highlighted, the one hour treatment begins. Elemis first grade, premium essential oils are used in combination with Swedish massage techniques to promote a sense of relaxation and well-being. The treatment finishes with a New Zealand herbal tea of the client's choice.

What are the benefits of this treatment for the client?
The benefits include a sense of rest and relaxation, stress release, elimination of toxins, and the release of muscular aches and pains. A classical Swedish massage is a holistic treatment that can improve mental, physical, and emotional well-being.

What are the contraindications to the client during this treatment?
Contraindications include pregnancy within the first three months, non-medicated high blood pressure, deep vein thrombosis, allergies, etc. These will all be covered in the consultation process.

What supplies are needed for the aesthetician to perform this treatment?
The aesthetician will need sweet almond oil, Elemis body active concerntrate oils, and Instant Refreshing Gel.

Is there any form of education that is needed by the aesthetician before performing this treatment on the client?
All of our therapists have a Diploma in Massage or other relevant Spa/Beauty qualifications. They also need to have been practicing for at least one year.

Why is this treatment popular in your country?
Massage therapy is becoming a more recognized form of health and injury prevention in New Zealand. With increased education in the workplace regarding OOS (Occupational Overuse Syndrome), the awareness of the importance of health and well-being is growing. Spa at the Hyatt offers a retreat from the everyday demands of the modern world.
One thing that I noticed throughout most of these spas and their treatment is how almost every treatment had something to do with its surroundings, something to make it unique. Find something that your community is known for, and start a treatment idea with it. Maybe your city is known for the most luxurious golf courses in the world, or what if your town is known for its natural spring water... Spend some time in your surroundings and integrate the ideas you find for your new treatment.
And remember: it is essential to study every aspect of a treatment, from start to finish. Understand the benefits so you can use them as selling points to your clients. Watch out for the contraindications so you know when you need to redirect the client to another treatment. Take these ideas you've seen and transform them into your own. Take parts from each treatment and infuse them all into your new treatment – and make it your most popular treatment… hey, you could even call it, Treatments around the World.

Please note that every spa which participated in this special section is from a Hyatt hotel. They are in order as follows: Hyatt Regency Waikiki Beach Resort and Spa in Hawaii; Hyatt Regency La Manga in Spain; Hyatt Regency Istanbul in Turkey; Hyatt Regency Johannesburg in South Africa; Grand Hyatt Cairo in Egypt; Ararat Park Hyatt Moscow in Russia; Park Hyatt Saigon in Vietnam; Park Hyatt Seoul in South Korea; Grand Hyatt Bali in Indonesia; Hyatt Regency Auckland in New Zealand.



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By Jeremy Lawrence | January 21, 2019

Move over sunscreens! Make room for antioxidant-rich, pre- and post-sun treatments that not only protect against the sun's damaging UV assault, but (in many cases) repair and even reverse the damage. The effects of ultraviolet (UV) radiation on the skin are well documented and the mainstream media has extoled the preventive benefits of sunscreens for years. But sunscreens do not block all the earth's UV light and, despite the hype, they are way underutilized.
Fortunately, there are numerous ingredients that can mitigate the sun's damage when applied prior to exposure and, in some cases, even reverse UV-induced signs of aging once the damage is done.

Sun's Uv Assault: A Growing Threat
For years, we have known that chronic UV exposure results in DNA damage, photoaging, hyperpigmentation and skin cancer. Specifically, UVA exposure generates harmful compounds known as reactive oxygen species (ROS), including singlet oxygen, hydrogen peroxide and hydroxyl free radicals. These ROS react with the skin's DNA, proteins, lipids and saccharides, causing oxidative damage that can lead to injured blood vessels, structural damage to the DNA, an impaired immune system and cell death – or, in plain English, wrinkles, loss of elasticity, age spots and skin cancer.
While ROS are wreaking their havoc on the skin's keratinocytes (the predominant cells comprising the epidermal layer) and fibroblasts (the dermal cells responsible for generating connective tissue), the sun's UVB rays are depleting the skin of its natural antioxidants, rendering it defenseless against the sun's UV-induced free radicals. This leads to a cascade of even more damaging events, ultimately resulting in the degradation of yet more collagen and elastin.
Fortunately, we have antioxidants – the best antidote to the sun's mayhem. In recent years, one specific class of antioxidants known as phenolics have received significant regard among the antioxidant category for their ability to protect the skin before, during and after UV exposure.

Pre- And Post-Treating Skin With Phenolics
Formulators often integrate vitamins C, E and beta-carotene into pre- and post-treatment skin care to help fortify the skin's defenses against UV-induced free radicals. But phenolics, representing one of the richest sources of the plant-based antioxidant family, may be capable of protecting the skin at even greater levels and in different ways against the sun's assault. Indeed, many phenolic flavonoids such as quercetin, luteolin and catechins offer more effective antioxidants than what vitamins C and E and beta-carotene can offer single-handedly.
With approximately 8,000 naturally occurring compounds to their name, phenolics encompass phenolic acids, flavonoids and polyphenols and are naturally abundant in fruit (namely berries, citrus, grapes, apples, apricots, cherries and plums) and vegetables (such as onions, broccoli, tomatoes, lettuce, olives, cabbage and eggplant). Coffee beans, tea, grains and even red wine also offer plentiful sources of phenolic acids, flavonoids and polyphenols.
Phenolics, particularly polyphenols, exhibit health benefits ranging from antiviral, antibacterial, immune-stimulating, anti-inflammatory and anti-carcinogenic activity. Even after the skin has absorbed its fair share of ROS, the flavonoids and phenolic acids of these ingredients are hard at work, scavenging the free radicals, chelating metal ions such as iron and copper, and inhibiting the activities of damaging enzymes in
the skin.

Resveratrol
One of the most well-known phenolic ingredients – resveratrol – rose to fame in 2004 when its cancer-fighting and heart-protective benefits were lauded widely by the mainstream press. Today, skin care chemists continue to turn to this potent antioxidant for its free radical-scavenging and anti-inflammatory benefits. Sourced from the skin and seeds of grapes, peanuts and berries, resveratrol has proven itself as a significant inhibitor of UVB-induced skin edema when topically applied to mice. In fact, pre-treatment of resveratrol resulted in a decrease of UVB-induced hydrogen peroxide and leukocytes, a marker of UV-induced oxidative stress, according to a study published in Frontiers in Bioscience.
Most recently, a 2011 European Journal of Pharmacology study demonstrated resveratrol's ability to increase the viability of human keratinocytes following UVA exposure and protect them from UVA stress while upregulating antioxidant enzyme activity.

Green and Black Tea Polyphenols
Another widely used antioxidant and anti-inflammatory source, green and black tea (Camelia sinensis) offer one of the best, most proven natural defenses against the sun's harmfulUV rays. Tea provides polyphenols such as epigallocatechin-3-gallate (EGCG). Many published studies have proven tea's anti-inflammatory and anti-carcinogenic abilities at even multiple stages of cancer formation in mice.
Green tea polyphenols, in particular, have been shown to protect the skin against UVB-induced edema (swelling) and erythema (redness), lipid peroxidation (the "stealing" of electrons which leads to free radical production), depletion of enzymes essential to the skin's antioxidant defense system and more.
In a report published in Free Radical Biology & Medicine, researchers demonstrated green and black tea's ability to scavenge the ROS hydrogen peroxide and inhibit UV-induced DNA damage. Green tea polyphenols also have the ability to induce apoptosis (cell death) in human cancer cells.

Ferulic and Caffeic Acids
Grains, fruits and vegetables not only provide a great source of vitamins A, C, E and B; they also yield ferulic and caffeic acids, both of which have demonstrated the ability to protect the skin's phospholipidic membranes from UV-induced peroxidation. Ferulic acid, in particular, has exhibited strength in protecting human skin from UVB-induced erythyma and proven its worth as a potent UV absorber in many lotions and sunscreens.

Quercetin
One of the most common flavonoids, quercetin serves the skin as a powerful antioxidant when integrated into a pre- and post-sun skin care regimen. Found in apples, grapes, lemons, onions, broccoli, kale, cottonseed and the herb gingko biloba, quercetin diminishes the harmful effects of UV light. In a study published in Clinical and Experimental Dermatology, researchers demonstrated that the flavonoid has the ability to protect the skin's antioxidant systems glutathione peroxidase, glutathione reductase, catalase and superoxide dismutase against
UVA irradiation.

fruit

Apigenin
Another common plant-based flavonoid, apigenin may help prevent UVA- and UVB-induced skin cancers, according to two studies published in Anticancer Research and Carcinogenesis. In those studies, tumor incidence decreased with a topical application of apigenin, which is derived from herbs like endive and clove, fruits like apples and cherries, vegetables, and beverages like tea and wine.

Genistein
It turns out soybeans not only offer a great phytoestrogenic and protein source for vegans and menopausal women, but its valuable phytonutrient genestein has also been shown to inhibit UVB-induced tumors in mice, according to a study published in Carcinogenesis.
Further, a 2001 study published in Photochemistry and Photobiology demonstrated how a topical application substantially inhibited UVB-induced hydrogen peroxide production and contact hypersensitivity and lowered the inflammatory edema reaction in mice.

Carnosic Acid
Rosemary and sage's main constituent, carnosic acid, is not only a potent antioxidant but also touts wide-ranging chemoprotective effects against carcinogens as demonstrated in a study published in the Journal of the National Cancer Institute of Medicine. A separate study published in Free Radical Biology & Medicine found human fibroblasts that were pre-treated with carnosic acid resulted in suppression of metalloproteinase-1 (MMP) mRNA, a damaging enzyme caused by UVA irradiation and a biomarker of photoaging.

Silymarin
Widely used as medicine in Europe for 2,000 years, silymarin has been used most commonly for treating liver diseases. However, silymarin, a standardized extract derived from the seeds of the milk thistle, may also have chemoprotective activity against skin cancer, according to several published papers.
Topical application is thought to significantly inhibit UVB-induced skin edema and formation of sunburn and apoptotic cells, the destructive cells that cause cell death. It is also known to protect against the formation of UVB-induced cyclobutane-pyrimidine dimers (CPDs), pre-mutagenic lesions found in DNA and the primary cause of melanoma, according to the animal study published in Frontiers in Bioscience.
In a 2007 Czech study, silymarin was shown to extensively reduced depletion of GSH, the body's natural antioxidant, glutathione; ROS production; and lipid peroxidation in irradiated cells. In this report, silymarin also significantly decreased formation of UVA-induced DNA damage.

Tannins
One of the plant kingdom's most formidable defense systems against predators and UV radiation has also proven useful to humans in protecting our skin against the ravages of the sun. Tannins offer potent antioxidant activity against free radical damage, resulting in a lowered risk of skin cancer and premature aging. When applied topically or injected, tannins have demonstrated the ability to reduce hydrogen peroxide production, decrease tumor incidence and delay their appearance in the skin of mice.
The rich tannin content in the root extract Sanguisorba officinalis L. may explain why the topical application of this extract has resulted in reduced wrinkle formation and preservation of skin elasticity, as shown in an animal study published in Biological & Pharmaceutical Bulletin.

French Maritime Pine Bark Extract
French maritime pine bark extract, also known as Pycnogenol®, is a blend of phenols and polyphenols (i.e. catechin and epicatechin) and phenolic acids (i.e. caffeic, ferulic and gallic). Demonstrating stellar free radical-scavenging abilities, Pycnogenol boosts the production of antioxidant enzymes and has been shown to significantly prevent UV-induced erythema, according to studies published in International Journal of Clinical Pharmacology and Therapeutics and Free Radical Biology & Medicine.

Grape Seed Extract
Rich in a compound known as oligomeric proahtocyanidins (OPCs), grape seeds protect the skin against inflammation and carcinogenic activity while also providing a broad-reaching anti-aging function. Grape seed extract has demonstrated the ability to prevent UVB- and UVC-induced lipid peroxidation.
Studies have shown grape seeds to be a more effective antioxidant than vitamins C and E alone. In fact, Canada's Food Research Group reported that grape seed OPCs provide 20 times the antioxidant power of vitamin E and 50 times the potency of vitamin C. The report, published in the winter 2003 issue of Journal of Medicinal Food noted that grape seed extract protects the body against sun damage by bonding with collagen to help maintain skin's cell health and elasticity.

Pomegranate
From ancient to modern times, pomegranates have been favored as medicine, largely for their rich ellagic acid content. This potent free radical scavenger helps replenish the body's natural stores of the antioxidant glutathione, which further helps protect the skin's DNA. Pomegranate's ellagic acid also fortifies cell membranes to defend against free radical damage and water loss while inhibiting damaging enzymes that can upset the skin's healthy cell turnover.
Numerous in vitro and in vivo studies have shown pomegranate offers a strong anti-inflammatory, antioxidant and
anti-carcinogen activity in skin. A study published in the Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry found that five to 60 mg/L of a standardized pomegranate fruit extract protected human skin fibroblast cells from cell death following exposure to UVA and UVB radiation; whereas, a higher dosage of 500 to 10,000 mg/L significantly reduced UV-induced ROS levels and increased intracellular antioxidant levels.25 In addition, a small independent study found that adding pomegranate extract to sunscreen boosted the SPF by 20 percent.

Vitamin C
fruit-2 The beneficial free radical-scavenging abilities of vitamin C have been well documented for years. But in 1996, researchers at the North Carolina Biotechnology Center reported an interesting discovery: Vitamins C and E have the ability to boost a sunscreen's protection against UV damage. While vitamin E is most effective at defending the skin against UVB exposure, vitamin C protects significantly better against an UVA assault. When vitamin C or a combination of vitamins C and E is formulated with a commercial UVA sunscreen, an "apparently greater than additive protection" is demonstrated, the researchers reported in the Acta Dermato Venereologica. "These results confirm the utility of antioxidants as photoprotectants but suggest the importance of combining the compounds with known sunscreens to maximize photoprotection," the authors noted.
And as published in the International Journal of Toxicology and elsewhere, researchers have reported ascorbic acid's photoprotective qualities prior to UV exposure.
However, the instability and relatively short shelf life of water-soluble ascorbic acid has made formulation with this vitamin antioxidant challenging for many. In contrast, tetrahexyldecyl ascorbate (BV-OSC) provides a stable, oil-soluble form of vitamin C with many benefits. BV-OSC provides potent
antioxidant, DNA protection, UV protection, MMP inhibition, collagen synthesis and skin whitening activity. At the same concentration, BV-OSC has been shown to maintain a higher penetration in the skin even when compared to ascorbic acid at levels 25 times that of BV-OSC.29
In collagen synthesis studies, a 0.1 percent level of BV-OSC added to a fibroblast culture resulted in a 50 percent proliferation of cells. At the same level, BV-OSC reduced melanogenesis by more than 80 percent in an in vitro test.
The antioxidant activity of BV-OSC also has a longer incubating time in the skin when compared to its water-soluble counterpart. In studies, BV-OSC's reduction ratio for stable radical reducing activity measured 18.7 percent, 52 percent and 98.1 percent, respectively, after three hours, 24 hours and 42 hours. On the other hand, ascorbic acid's reduction ratio neared the 100 percent mark after only 30 minutes. Thus, BV-OSC would appear to offer longer-term UV protection in the sun. In addition, this stable vitamin C increases cell viability by up to 30 percent compared to pure ascorbic acid, giving the skin an edge when faced with UV exposure.
Another popular vitamin C choice for pre-UV treatments is magnesium ascorbyl phosphate (MAP), a stable ascorbate ester that has demonstrated the ability to delay skin tumor formation in mice when applied after exposure to UV radiation. MAP also has melanin suppression capabilities, as seen clinically in 19 of 34 patients with melasma and solar lentigos (pigmented spots), according to a report published in Journal of the American Academy of Dermatology.

New Innovators
A number of newer, innovative ingredients have also hit the skin care market, stocking the chemist's formulary with treatments perfected for pre- and post-UV exposure.

Light-Activated Photosomes
One of the more intriguing ingredients to come about in years, light-activated photosomes use a patented delivery system and technology inspired by blue algae, which over time have developed a natural resistance to extreme sunlight and UV. Like the plankton in the ocean, the skin benefits from these photosomes by using the energy from visible light to help repair UV damage. The enzymes in the photosomes absorb visible light to cleave the damaged DNA's cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers and reverse the damage. By applying to skin before or after sun exposure, this novel ingredient is shown to reverse the UV-induced damage upon exposure to photoreactivating light and penetrate the keratinocytes with liposomes that release DNA-repairing enzymes.

Dermox SRC
Dermox SRC, a unique blend of bamboo silica, helps replenish the body's natural depletion of silica and thus stimulate the skin's chondroblasts to produce chondroitin and hyaluronic acid. In addition to bamboo, this proprietary complex is comprised of pea extract – which helps the skin generate collagen and elastin – and glucosamine (a natural skin exfoliator that also stimulates the dermal fibroblasts for a smoother complexion). In clinical studies, Dermox SRC resulted in more than a 45 percent improvement in reducing lines and wrinkles compared to a 4.7 percent improvement with a base gel over a four-week period. In addition, Dermox displayed superior collagen-stimulating activity compared to ascorbic acid.

Renovage™
This proprietary ingredient comprised of caprylic/capric triglyceride and teprenone helps UV-stressed skin weather normal signs of UV-induced signs of aging, including wrinkles, dehydration, age spots and a broken barrier function. Renovage helps stabilize the cells' telomere function, the end "fuses" of our chromosomes that protect our DNA's vital cell data and maintain proper cell division. This oil-soluble ingredient also maintains cell communication and metabolism and can delay cell senescence and extend cell lifespan by one-third. In a simple blind study of 24 mature-aged women, a twice daily application of a cream containing three percent Renovage resulted in up to 58 percent moisturization, 46 percent epidermal barrier integrity improvement and 56 percent improvement in UV sun spots over six months.

Silicone Dispersants
Finally, certain ingredients can significantly improve the quality of sunscreens by enhancing the water resistance, spreadability, transparency, SPF and dispersion of the active ingredients. For example, the SPD series, a dispersion of fine titanium dioxide and zinc oxide in a cyclopentasiloxane blend, offers a stable, low-viscosity welcome addition to transparent sunscreens.

While much focus has been placed on the role of sunscreens in preventing UV damage, there is a wealth of data supporting the benefit of new, innovative proprietary ingredients as well as time-proven vitamins and phenolics. As consumers sharpen their savvy to these skin-friendly ingredients, all will continue to enjoy a greater presence on the backs of labels in pre- and post-UV skin treatments now and in the future.

sam-dhattSam Dhatt was born and raised in India. He achieved a MS in Chemistry and an MBA in Marketing and Finance. Dhatt's introduction as a leader in innovative technology begins with his work in 1992 with alpha hydroxy acids, which was in its infancy at the time. Then in 1995, he started his own cosmetics research and development company, Allure Cosmetics, Inc. In addition, Allure Cosmetics, Inc. also supplies hair care, foot care, spa products, cosmetic accessories and makeup to their 700 clients worldwide. In 1999, Dhatt opened another company, DermaQuest® Skin Therapy.



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By Jeremy Lawrence | January 21, 2019

This soothing mask combines the anti-aging properties of red clover, a great source of phytoestrogens, with the calming, healing effects of chamomile. In this treatment, these herbs are combined with rose hydrosol and the nourishing phytonutrients provided by sea buckthorn oil. When mixed with the white clay’s ability to draw out impurities, these ingredients help detoxify and rejuvenate the skin.

Ingredients:
1/4 teaspoon of powdered red clover blossoms
1/4 teaspoon of powdered chamomile flowers
2 teaspoons of kaolin (white) clay
1/2 teaspoon of sea buckthorn oil
Rose hydrosol (flower water)
*If you like, you can substitute powdered red clover and chamomile with tea made from these botanicals.

Directions:
Combine the powdered red clover blossoms, chamomile flowers, and the sea buckthorn oil with enough rose hydrosol to make a paste.

To Use:
Leave on for five to eight minutes. For personal treatments, simply rinse the mask off. With clients, gently remove with warm compresses.



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By | January 21, 2019

Our human skin is a marvel of evolution. And remarkably, much of its physiology and function even today remains a mystery which continues to be revealed. Which is why we all love working in skin therapy, right? Just when you thought you knew it all, up pops some newly discovered cell-capability, or ingredient breakthrough.
For example, only recently have scientists uncovered the intimate connection between brain, nerve endings, and skin, in that neurogenic inflammation is caused by a flood of chemicals called neuropetides that flow into the skin at times of stress.

This is a phenomenon that we skin therapists have recognized for a long time. Chronically stressed clients often complain of periods of irritated sensitized skin, emotional red flushing in the boardroom or other high-pressure situations, and eczema flare-ups around exam-time (or, worst of all, right before the big interview, or even the wedding!). We knew there was a link but just did not have all the how’s and why’s.
Perhaps like the larger riddles of the cosmos itself, the human skin and its ability to adapt and evolve in our surroundings will continue to amaze and educate us. But the science of the skin is a small aspect of the phenomenon. As skin therapists, the real evolution is happening not in the lab, but in the lobby and reception area. How we identify, contact, interact with, and serve our clients – these areas are where the biggest changes and challenges in our industry await us.

MOVING UP
The psyche of the skin care industry has traditionally been cloaked in mystique. In the early 20th century, the “facial” was treated nearly as a form of alchemy. Practitioners marketed themselves on the basis of their rigid rules, hush-hush beauty techniques, and imported exoticism, often French or Eastern European (and almost always French-speaking). Much of our industry’s classical terminology—effleurage, petrissage, tapotement, as strictly defined as a ballerina’s practice steps—remains steeped in this old-school Euro style.
And apart from the lingo, there was the attitude. The highly private treatment was given in a whispery, small, dimly-lit room, far from any other interaction. There might have even been a hidden entry and exit point, so the “lady” client and her secret to perfect hair and skin would never be discovered by a nosy neighbor. The four-story Victorian Maison Terry de Beauté in the United Kingdom, where I honed my skin care chops, was a perfect example. Today’s crystal-rubbing, dolphin-loving, “New Age” skin therapist has further replicated this aura of semi-mysticism, leading the client down a dim hallway to a cave-like room that is illuminated with flickering aromatherapy candles and has twinkly music playing in the background.
Those days are over. In order to make skin care relevant and profitable to today’s consumer, we must finally let the old business model go. Our clients do not want mystique or pampering, they want results and connection. And this is best conducted in the light of day.

FRONT AND CENTER
In the past year or two of economic free-fall, many of our clients say that they do not have time for skin care services. This is not quite the same statement as saying that they do not have the budget, although the two emotions and perceptions are related.
Today’s pressures truly make the languorous, rose-petal strewn “day of beauty” passé. Even the most prosperous of clients today feels time-pressured, has a more frugal mindset, and demands more quantifiable payoff for hours as well as dollars spent in the treatment bed.
This brings us to the first and perhaps most crucial part of the professional skin care evolution: the need to re-engineer and relocate the heart of your business, and offer some service in the front of the house to meet the needs of a changing consumer marketplace.
Bring service, and new aspects of the service, such as learning, testing, and “try-vertising” out onto the open floor. Think of the modern approach to upscale dining: the most happening restaurants place the chef and the prep-team close to the diners, since there is nothing to hide and everything to gain by bringing the customer close to the action. It is a liberating move for your clients, and for you.
Offer abbreviated, targeted services which do not require disrobing, so that they may be given just about anywhere in your work-space where there is access to running water and strong industrial lighting. A barber’s chair with neck support will do and takes up a lot less space. And before you jump in with “that won’t work”, consider this: who ever thought we would see massage chairs in upscale grocery stores and airports, or brow and threading kiosks in the mall? Also, remember that ISPA informs us that 46 percent of their member spas report an increase in shortened (30 minutes or less) treatment bookings, and 86 percent now offer shorter treatments.
Ideally, targeted services do not even require an appointment, creating a new spontaneity in your business model. Examples might include 20-minute treatments for blemish control, sunburn repair, puffy eyes or post-travel fatigue/hangover recovery. Now I am not suggesting that you take your regular, loyal, one-hour clients and convert them all over to 20 minute treatments – but surprisingly, when you offer these abbreviated “power hits” of skin care, you will find clients adding express treatments to their usual menu. This is great news for your bottom-line. Popping in for that Express Exfoliation Treatment before a big social event will soon become a favorite for them. More critically, the goal of the new breed of brief, targeted treatments is to attract all of those potential clients who have no history of skin care services, perfect for tweens, men, busy moms, and working professionals.
Here is a tip: Develop an active and current e-mail database as well as a social media following that you can e-mail, tweet, or post a same-day offer for specific services when business is slow. Offer a limited-edition product giveaway on the day of service to help get foot-traffic happening.

BELLY UP TO THE BAR
Another industry standard which deserves an update is the tester stand. Of course, this is a tried-and-true part of educating clients about product, and we cannot do without it. I am not suggesting that we get rid of it – I am suggesting that we expand it into more of a teaching and immersion experience.
If your skin care center, salon, or spa has one feature which needs upgrading, it may be your reception area. Is there a big sofa, a big coffee table, and stacks of old magazines out there? It is time to come clean and say hello to your new interactive space. The old reception desk and area is dead space, and it can be reinvented to energize sales by making the waiting option a seat at the bar. You will create a new relationship with a customer who may not be a service-client (yet…), but still has skin and needs a skin coach. Keep in mind that less than 10 percent of the population get treatments, but 100 percent are using some kind of products on their skin, whether it is professional grade or grocery store. So the potential for retailing and skin coaching is huge.
Ditch the couch and replace it with a bar with stools or even re-evaluate the reception desk – could part of it become a bar? This area can become an electrifying, energizing magnet for new business, mingling, and conversation as it lays the foundation for retail sales and future bookings. Walk-ins and waiting spouses will be drawn right to it, when offered a complimentary skin analysis, then served up the correct products for their skin, sushi-style on a tray, together with a headband, cotton and steamed towels. While looking in a mirror and using a mini-steamer, take them through a step-by-step, personalized regimen supported by your inside tips on the do’s and don’ts of good skin-keeping. Ever asked a client to show you how they use their products? It is truly enlightening, sometimes frightening, when you see them chug out gallons of cleanser and a rice-grain size of sun block. The coaching opportunity hits you like a spiritual calling to do more good. Regulars will gravitate toward it because they know they will be offered a free, refreshing beverage (hot herbal tea, chilled vitamin water), a relaxing steamed towel to freshen up, and a soothing hand cream application. It will undoubtedly become the epicenter for sharing, teaching, eventing, and selling.

TWEET TWEET, BUZZ BUZZ
There is talk these days about the demise of various social media venues, Twitter specifically. Some people say Twitter is “over,” but guess what? – it does not matter. Facebook and the universe of digital communication, which it has spawned, are with us forever. So, make it work for you! Begin by setting up your Facebook page and Twitter account, then add "Find Us" and "Follow Us" to every communication. Getting the e-mail address of everyone who is a client, has ever been a client, and whom you may someday want as a client is, however, the most critical “must do.” Social media is great for alerting in real time and staying connected, but the home mailing address and e-mail address are the core of your true database.
Next-post, tweet, and e-blast a simple greeting inviting everyone to your “Skin Bar Social,” offer complimentary beverages and snacks, capture all personal info by offering a raffle for a treatment, and do a skin analysis for every attendee. Get them buzzing around the bar as they try product, and if they are new potential clients, take them on a tour of your space. Before they leave, hand over a goodie bag containing your menu, any promotions, and a few trial-size product samples of your bestsellers. Now stand back. Your business is about to re-launch itself into overdrive.
More good news: Social media is not an alienating, dehumanizing force. Just the opposite is true, if you understand the psyche of users of the Blackberry, iPhone, Facebook, e-mail, and all the rest. People hunger for contact and communication. People who really do not understand social media say that Facebook and its various counterparts replace face-to-face interaction. The fast-moving information generation, which can include anyone who is receptive to the technology – regardless of the date on their birth certificate, uses social media as the means to make old-school style contact easier. I call them “connectors,” people who use hand-held personal electronics and the web to instantly share ideas, feelings, opinions, and more. Connectors reach out via digital media, then meet for cocktails, the theatre, runs on the beach, yoga, puppy-school, you name it. Connectors utilize technology to actually enhance intimacy, rather than deplete it.

ACCESS: SKIN
The key to re-calibrating your skin care business to what is happening in the global market is making it easy for your customers to say “Yes” instead of “No,” thereby creating easy access to your service. Many skin therapists make the tactical error of thinking that this is best accomplished by offering discounts. In a word: Don’t. Discounting erodes your brand identity. And the true evolution of today’s skin care marketing lies in enhanced value, not reduced price. Although on the surface, the world may seem to be concerned with the price-tag, the deeper message is that people hunger for a feeling of connection, and enhanced contact. Instead of dropping your price to activate bookings, hold an event; offer samples and snacks. Raise the ante with a few gift-baskets which include certificates for a free service, which elevates value rather than downgrading it. Skin care is really the ideal medium and the perfect industry for this message of high-tech enhanced connectivity and contact. Because our profession relies upon human touch, we as skin therapists are the original “connectors.” Take a fresh look at your business, and you will see how technology and even a simple reorganization of your floor plan will bring clients back to your skin care center, ready to receive services, purchase products, and, most importantly, ready to spread the word to their social network about your business.

Annet King is the Director of Training and Development for the International Dermal Institute (IDI). Her responsibilities include overseeing the IDI teaching staff around the globe, as well as developing the curriculum taught in all 43 countries. Beginning her career as a skin therapist for a day spa in England, she was quickly promoted to Operations Manager. King then became a skin therapy and business lecturer at Plymouth College of Further Education, where she realized her true passion for teaching. Her next position was as a Spa Director for Steiner Leisure, managing luxury spas onboard cruise ships. She is a licensed skin care therapist, certified by CIDESCO and CIBTAC, an instructor, and industry author.



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By Jeremy Lawrence | January 21, 2019

The following information is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis, or treatment. The opinions expressed by the author are based on personal experience in healing from depression and offering energy healing treatments to clients. The purpose of this article is to help you feel comfortable addressing and talking about depression – a social epidemic and the strongest risk factor for suicide. While you are reading this article, at least one person will commit suicide and up to 25 more will have attempted. The beauty industry can lead the way in the reduction of depression and prevention of suicide with energy healing wellness packages.

Shortly after my thirteenth birthday, the neighborhood bully targeted me. My mother, trying to intercept and reason with the bully, ended up getting caught in the crossfire. Twice, I had previously found my mother attempting suicide. The bully knew this and continued her rant, which included calling my mother crazy. My mother suffered from severe depression and the conflict with the bully was the last straw. Three hours later, she committed suicide. Within one day, I learned the devastating effects of depression, bullying, and suicide.
At that time in our culture, no one talked about suicide. The term clinical depression did not even exist. Back then, people who suffered from what we now call depression were considered crazy. In fact, talk about depression and suicide has been taboo until last summer when Robin Williams took his own life. The shock reverberated around the world. How could such a beloved and talented person commit suicide? Well, this has been my question for over 40 years.
factsGlobally, more than 350 million people of all ages suffer from depression. It is the leading cause of disability worldwide and is a major contributor to the global burden of disease. It is important to increase awareness of depression and suicide and make prevention a priority.
After my mother’s suicide, the fog of depression filled me. I hid behind a happy face but inside I was filled with guilt from not being able to save her. I secretly thought that my mother’s example might also be my fate. It was not until I turned 30 that I chose to live and move beyond depression. I healed myself within four years by using Reiki and energy medicine.
I incorporated what I learned through healing into my work with clients. This has given me over 27 years of research and the practical application of tools to heal from depression. The time has come to share my findings and create a “Your Life Matters to Me” movement within the beauty industry to be aware of and lend a healing hand to those in need.

What is Depression
According to the World Health Organization (WHO), depression is a common disorder characterized by sadness, loss of interest or pleasure, feelings of guilt, low self-worth, disturbed sleep or appetite, feelings of tiredness, and poor concentration. Depression can be long-lasting or periodic, impairing an individual’s ability to function at work, school, or cope with daily life.

cloudWarning Signs
Depression does not discriminate. It is like a fog that takes over the mind and turns all thoughts against a person. Although you cannot heal or save someone, you can show you care and be the inspiration for them to
heal themselves.
Some people are more susceptible to suicide than others. If you see someone having a difficult time, talk to them about whether they are suffering from depression and if they are considering suicide. Oftentimes, there is a loss or trigger that creates a last straw incident. Here are warning signs that could lead to a downward spiral of depression and suicide:

  • Loss of job
  • Divorce/Loss of relationship
  • Moving to a new area
  • Death of a loved one
  • Loss of health/Terminal illness
  • Dealing with a bully at home, school, or work
  • Financial worries

How to Speak to Someone Contemplating Suicide
People want to know their life matters. When someone is in distress, reach out to them. Ask them if they are alright and if there is any way you can help. If you know a person is contemplating suicide, talk to them about it! Do not pretend it is not happening. Stand in front of them, look into their eyes, and ask if there is something they are thinking about or planning. Their response will determine the level of urgency with which you are dealing. Let them know how hurt or devastated you would be if they took their life. Let them know that their life matters to you. List the reasons why they matter to you. We are one family. Each life lost to suicide affects us all. You never know when your kindness and encouragement will save a life.

talkMy Healing Discoveries
I have found that the cause of depression has to do with not being true to yourself. Years of pleasing others at your own expense, not following your intuition or feelings, and reacting to daily stressors causes you to leave bits and pieces of your energy behind. As you become depleted, you lose your sense of self and purpose in life.
The concept of mind over matter, along with denying intuition and feelings, has created excessive stress and anxiety, robbing people from being whole. Contrary to popular belief, healing does not happen in the mind. While the mind can help choose a different path, it is not where the core of healing takes place. Healing takes place by regaining balance within the subtle energy body.
Everyone has an energy body. Think of it as an invisible bubble surrounding your body that provides you with vital life force energy. You get a sense of people by feeling their energy before even speaking to them. Someone with healthy energy has a twinkle in their eyes and a certain presence that is appealing to be around. Their beauty radiates from within. A healthy energy body provides everything needed to blossom and become the person you are meant to be.
Stress, anxiety, constant mental chatter, and depression are warning signs caused by depletion of the subtle energy body. When someone’s energy is depleted, emptiness or dullness can be seen in their eyes. They can be experienced as having negative energy. They are not present and may appear to be running on auto-pilot, which is a sign of depression.
The subtle energy body can be healed with energy healing modalities. Quieting the mind is essential to healing as it allows a person to tap into their intuition and feelings. Intuition guides people on their path and feelings validate what is right for them to keep on track. They are the internal GPS system. The mind is part of the creation process by helping figure out how to bring insights to fruition. When creating whole self, a sense of self and purpose is discovered.

continuimWellness in Aesthetics
According to the Global Wellness Institute, "Global Spa and Wellness Economy Monitor," 2014, a movement is taking place towards more personal accountability for one’s health. The trend towards being proactive is replacing the old paradigm of being reactive.
The failure of the conventional medical system to pre-empt and treat chronic conditions is driving many consumers toward wellness and preventative services to maintain and improve their health. All of the wellness sectors have direct market interactions with the core spa industry, and they present potential opportunities to pursue new wellness-oriented business ventures, beyond the menu of products and services traditionally offered at spas. The Health Continuum below shows this
new trend.

Energy Healing Solutions – Wellness Packages
Aestheticians have the opportunity, when properly trained, to be part of a preventative solution. There are a number of change makers in the skin care industry who improve the lives of others. Some professionals will be called to step into the realm of energy healing. If skin care professionals feel called from within to heal and offer healing work in their practice, their purpose is calling them forward.
The National Institutes of Health recognizes energy healing as a category within complementary and alternative medicine (CAM). Professionals should provide treatments and products containing nature’s energy that fill client’s inner subtle energy body and outer physical body. With weekly treatments of 30 to 45 minutes, clients are usually balanced by the third visit. It is common for them to report that they have less stress and anxiety with more clarity and awareness. The following are the prime energy healing modalities professionals should use in their practice.
Meridian point treatments are based on traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) to create flow within the energy meridians of the body, or chakra, balancing with Reiki, which infuses the subtle energy body with universal healing energy. To complement the treatments, meditation can be incorporated to tap into intuitive wisdom; gemstones and flower essences can be used to infuse clients with nature’s energy.
The following therapies help balance the body, mind, and emotions, but do not heal the energy body by themselves. Homeopathic and naturopathic medicine, Ayurveda, hypnotherapy, aromatherapy, and herbs are a great complement to energy healing and traditional aesthetics. A variety of these modalities can be combined into a 30- to 60-day wellness package (offered weekly). Professionals have the means to help clients move beyond depression.

Energy Medicines From Nature
If clients are taking prescribed medicine, before using, have them consult with their doctor. During intake, check for specific allergies to herbs or essential oils.

herbsHerbs
Herbs are plant materials that may be taken in the form of capsules, teas, and herbal tinctures. The following herbs have been scientifically studied and proven to help alleviate depression. As a precautionary measure, do not serve herbs to pregnant clients.
St. John’s Wort (tea, capsules, or herbal tincture) – An anti-viral herb that helps increase serotonin and melatonin levels, relieving stress and assisting in sleep. Contraindications: Do not use St. John’s Wort with other medications or birth control pills.

  • Lemon Balm (tea) – A nervine that lifts the spirits as it soothes and calms the nerves.
  • Scullcap (tea or capsules) – An anti-viral and anti-inflammatory nervine used to relax and reduce stress quickly. Contraindications: Do not use with immunosuppressants. Use in moderation in capsule or tincture form.
  • Oatstraw (tea, bath, tincture) – A nutritive nerve tonic used for the release of stress and exhaustion. Contraindications: may contain gluten.

Essential Oils
The volatile oils from plants and flowers contain plant hormones that react with the hormone centers in the brain, triggering a physiological change in mood or behavior. Place a few drops of your preferred essential oil in a diffuser or add to water and mist over clients
during treatments.

  • Bergamot – Balancing, uplifting, anti-depressant
  • Clary Sage – Relaxing, euphoric, good for mental fatigue, reduces nervous tension
  • Lavender – Balancing, calming, relaxing, anti-depressant
  • Melissa – Tonic for the nervous system, soothing, calming, anti-depressant
  • Ylang-Ylang – Heightens the senses, aphrodisiac, reduces fear and anger

stonesBach Flower Remedies
Flower essences such as Bach flower remedies capture the vibration or spirit of the plant. They work on specific emotional and mental conflicts, past programming, and traumas. It is recommended that clients put four drops under the tongue three to four times a day until one or more bottles are finished. Do not use with clients who are allergic to alcohol as the formulas contain brandy as a preservative. The following lists the most effective remedies for lifting depression and helping
clients to heal:

  • Rescue Remedy – A blend of five flower essences to reduce the effects of shock or trauma.
  • Mustard – Provides seeds of faith to renew, dispels feelings of doom and gloom and encourages joy.
  • Olive – Rejuvenates and restores mental and physical vitality to experience pleasure in life.
  • White Chestnut – Reduces mental chatter to provide peace and clarity of mind.
  • Walnut – Helps to set boundaries and protects from unwanted, outside influences.

Gemstones
Gemstones infuse the vibration of color and nature into treatments. Professionals can place colorful stones on the chakra centers during a healing treatment.

  • Black Tourmaline – Grounding, neutralizes negativity, clears energy
  • Snowflake Obsidian – Helps shed light in the dark
  • Blue Lace Agate – Calming, dissolves stress and fear
  • Strawberry Quartz – Helps heal heart wounds
  • Rose Quartz – The love stone, helps to feel lovable and share love

movementLife provides moments of connection that lift the fog enough for transformation to occur. As you consciously focus on healing your subtle energy body, you quiet the mind and calm the emotions to gain peace within. When the mind is peaceful, one is able to tap into their internal GPS to receive intuitive insights and feel what is true for them. Life becomes a creation, rather than a reaction. Everyone is here for a reason. Once a person discovers themselves, they discover their reason for being alive. Help clients heal and discover themselves and a life could be saved. Your life matters to me!

Resources:
1. Hay, Louise, (1984). You Can Heal Your Life. Print.
2. Depression, World Health Organization (WHO).
3. Suicide Facts, Suicide Awareness Voices of Education.


Linda Bertaut-2015Linda Bertaut, award-winning beauty expert, aesthetician, speaker, Milady author, holistic Reiki master teacher, specializes in transformative aesthetics. Known as the beauty industry's "Reiki and energy-healing educator," her signature wellness treatments and innovative techniques are being used in salons and spas throughout the country. Contact Bertaut for a complementary consultation on how to add energy-healing in your beauty business. www.bertautreiki.com, linda@chakralicious.com or 925-446-6284



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By Jeremy | January 21, 2019

Throughout history, the skin's color, whether a result of sun tanning or sun shielding, has served as a sort of status symbol. For many years, pale and refined skin was almost globally revered and sometimes attained through drastic measures. It was not until the 1920s that the tan became fashionable; since then, there has been a rise in sun damage and skin cancer rates. Is there one right solution to achieving the benefits of sun exposure while avoiding the unpleasant side effects for people of all genetic profiles?

 

 

 

'When the Sun Damage is Done' from Dermascope on Vimeo.

A person's ability to protect themselves from the adverse effects of sunshine lies in their genetic makeup. Although the ability to protect the skin from overexposure to the sun's powerful rays is possible, repairing the damage is not quite as easy.

beachshot

THE HISTORY OF SUNBATHING
In both the United States and Europe, the tan has gone in and out of fashion, but the preference for fair skin did not truly end until the conclusion of the Victorian Era. Before the close of that era, a light-skinned appearance was artificially achieved with arsenic and lightening powders and clothing at that time was tailored to shield the skin from the tanning effects of the sun's rays. In the 1920s, almost suddenly, people began exchanging their pale, refined skin for the bronzed appearance previously regarded for the lower class or those who had to labor outdoors. Legend has it that it was fashion mogul, Coco Chanel, who began the sun-kissed trend in the 1920s when she received too much sun while on holiday in the Mediterranean. According to the story, Coco Chanel returned home from her Mediterranean vacation and shortly thereafter, high society fans began chasing the sun's kiss and trading in their pale skin. In Europe, Parisians fell in love with Josephine Baker, a caramel-skinned singer in Paris, and idolized her dark skin. These two women were the leading figures of the transformation that tan skin underwent, in which it became perceived as fashionable, healthy, and luxurious.

SOLAR BENEFITS
Today, it is understood that warm rays of sunshine can have damaging effects on the body. It may be responsible for as much as 90 percent of visible aging, including keratosis, brown discoloration and wrinkles; but, a dose of the sun does have benefits as well.

Moderate sun exposure contributes to the production of vitamin D by the body, regulating sleep cycles and improving the immune system. Dr. Richard Weller, a leading researcher and dermatologist, has concluded through studies that a regular, moderate dose of the sun could lower blood pressure and that, although the benefits of sunlight are often attributed to vitamin D, a gas called nitric oxide is also important. Made when the sun hits the skin, nitric oxide lowers blood pressure when it enters the bloodstream. Although the reduction is small, it could make a big difference.

Weller writes, "High blood pressure is the world's leading cause of premature death and disease because it leads to stroke and heart disease. Even a small reduction in blood pressure across the whole population will reduce overall rates of stroke and heart attack." quote

RISKS OF PROLONGED SUN EXPOSURE
While moderate exposure to the sun may contribute to an improved immune system and a reduced risk for stroke and heart attack by increasing the body's production of vitamin D and nitric oxide, excessive exposure to ultraviolet rays has been linked to negative health effects. Some of the negative side effects of too much sun exposure include sunburn, a depressed immune system, and an increased risk of skin cancer. Furthermore, excessive sun exposure is considered to be the single biggest cause of visible aging, so while bronzed skin may be attractive to some, the cumulative, long-term effects are certainly not. The unsightly signs of aging that are always complained about, such as loss of skin elasticity, uneven skin tone, and wrinkles, are all a result of overzealous sun worshiping or cumulative sun exposure.

While some people possess the ability to tan with ease, others do not have the genetic benefit of producing the rich, golden-brown tones that ultimately serve to protect the DNA from the damaging effects of the sun. For those individuals who fall into the lower classifications on the Fitzpatrick scale, they should be warned that though they may desire the appearance of bronzed skin, they are at an increased risk of developing the negative side effects related to sun exposure and should take extra precaution when outdoors.

Fears surrounding the risks of tanning were confirmed in 2009 when it was found that rates of malignant melanoma in the United Kingdom had more than quadrupled in the past 30 years and that it is the most common form of cancer among those between the ages of 15 and 34. Furthermore, the World Health Organization has found that people who use tanning devices before age 30 are 75 percent more likely to develop melanoma.

The Sunbed (Regulation) Act, introduced in the United Kingdom in 2010 with much help from Girls Aloud singer and ex-tanner Nicola Roberts, made it illegal for any business to allow people under the age of 18 to use tanning beds or any electrically powered device that emits ultraviolet radiation to produce a tan. However, there is no regulation on how often an adult can use a sunbed. backshot

In December 2015, the FDA proposed tanning bed age restrictions in the United States in an effort to protect consumers. Stephen Ostroff, M.D., the acting FDA commissioner at the time, stated, "Today's action is intended to help protect young people from a known and preventable cause of skin cancer and other harms.

 

tanningbedIndividuals under 18 years are at greatest risk of the adverse health consequences of indoor tanning." While the United States is still lacking a federal age restriction on tanning beds, many states have adopted their own policies on the subject that range from completely prohibiting tanning bed use for those under the age of 18 to needing parental consent to use the tanning bed if the consumer is under the age of 17 to requiring anyone under the age of 14 to be accompanied by a parent or guardian. Thus far, 13 states have completely banned the use of tanning beds for all minors under the age of 18, with California being the first state to do so in January 2012. Furthermore, some cities and counties, such as Chicago and Howard County, Maryland, have also begun to regulate the use of tanning beds.

THE SKIN'S UNIQUE RESPONSE TO THE SUN
A person's skin color and their ability to tan is determined by their genetics. Natural, unsunned skin can be appreciated in a range of colors from dark brown to nearly translucent. In 1975, Harvard dermatologist Thomas B. Fitzpatrick devised the Fitzpatrick scale, which described the common tanning behavior of various skin types.

REVERSING SUN DAMAGE
More than likely, almost everyone has gone outdoors unprepared and suffered the negative consequences of the sun. For those who have been or still are repeat offenders, the battle with uneven skin color, rough skin texture, and brown spots, at a minimum, is seemingly constant. Before giving up, remember that there are therapeutic interventions available, including professional skin treatments and homecare products, that can reverse the damage and restore the skin to a more youthful, refined quality. Of course, consistency is key and diligence in the application of these beneficial skin care product is crucial to turning back the damage.

Some of the ingredients that should be looked for when treating sun damage are alpha and beta hydroxy acids, such as glycolic, lactic, citric, mandelic, and salicylic acids; these ingredients not only smooth the skin's surface for a more refined quality, but have also been proven to reverse the visible signs of sun damage. Vitamin A ingredients, such as tretinoin and retinaldehyde are also effective, although they can be irritating to the skin and cause erythema.

Other peptide ingredients like tyranostat can also serve to modulate pigment production for a more even skin tone and ingredients such as licorice, arbutin, bearberry, mulberry, and kojic acid are effective natural skin lightening agents that are safe for the entire body.

faceschart

The products that are applied to the skin on a daily basis can make a big difference in the quality of the skin and in repairing the sun damage of times past. In order to make a great improvement in repairing the effect sun damage has played on the skin, incorporate a series of professionally administered treatments, including chemical resurfacing treatments, IPL, fractionated erbium, and CO2 laser therapies, which collectively work to reduce the sun damage and restore the skin to a healthier complexion.

PREVENTION AND PROTECTION
Ingredients and garments to protect the skin, such as pants, SPF, and hats, should be utilized when spending time outside. Nothing that can be applied topically or performed at a skin care professional treatment facility can outweigh the benefits that can only be achieved through the prevention of sun damage. To guard against the damaging effects of overexposure to ultraviolet rays, protect the skin by taking a few moments to prepare before going outdoors. Pack lightweight clothing to wear during the peak sunlight hours of the day and slather on a broad spectrum physical sunscreen that contains either one or both of the accepted natural sun-shielding ingredients, such as zinc oxide and titanium dioxide. Enjoy the protective benefits of antioxidants such as topical vitamin C; for a double dose of protection, eat nuts, berries, and dark green, leafy vegetables. If golden skin is desired, rather than chasing the sun or spending time in tanning salons, opt for self-tanners that are free of dihydroxyacetone – which is under suspicion of altering DNA, damaging mucous membranes, and even causing cancer – to achieve a bronze look.

While the adequate amount of sun is still debatable, enjoying modest amounts of sunshine also provides wellness-enhancing benefits that regulate circadian rhythm and improve sleep and the body's immune system. With recurrent damage caused by sunburns, the body is at increased risk for developing skin cancer.

Because of the vast natural shades of skin color and the body's genetic predisposition to tanning, there may not be any singular right answer for the appropriate amount of sunshine or protection for all people. By following the Fitzpatrick scale and identifying their skin type, people can easily select the amount of solar protection that is right for them and prevent damage before it begins. If skin damage has already occurred, there are aesthetic and medical interventions that can be utilized to restore the skin to a more healthy, vibrant, youthful-looking complexion. face

References
United States Food and Drug Administration. (2015). FDA proposes tanning bed age restrictions and other important safety measures [News release]. Retrieved from http://www.fda.gov/NewsEvents/Newsroom/PressAnnouncements/ucm477434.htm
Weller, R. (2015). Shunning the sun may be killing you in more ways than you think. New Scientist, (3025).

devonperryDevon Perry is a leading visionary, entrepreneur, aesthetic educator, results coach, and the founder of Veritas Bioactive Cosmetics. She has been featured in Austin Monthly Magazine, Austin American Statesman, American Spa Magazine, Spa Canada Magazine, DERMASCOPE Magazine, Celebrity Style Guide, and The Fredericksburg Standard. Perry specializes in education and the administration of multi-modality treatments for a global approach to acne and age prevention. She also developed Veritas Bioactive Cosmetics skin care formulations, professional resurfacing solutions, and step-by-step protocols for spas, skin clinics, and cosmetic retail counters.



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