Rachelle Dupree

Rachelle Dupree

Serene Solutions: Natural Therapies for Stressed Skin

Skin is responsible for clearing toxins, retaining moisture, and defending against environmental stressors. External and internal stressors can result in a myriad of skin responses, including acne, hyperpigmentation, eczema, psoriasis, rosacea, dehydration, and excessive oil production. Inflammation, under-eye bags, dark eye circles, flaky skin, and wrinkles can also be visible when the body or its environment is out of balance.

The first thing good skin care professionals may tell a client with stressed-out skin is to evaluate and fine-tune their diet and try holistic skin treatments. Healing and preventing stressed skin holistically mirrors what has already been proven by the medical community for long-term skin health and vitality.

Besides advising clients to adopt a healthy lifestyle, the second line of defense includes a number of at-home holistic treatments that can provide temporary reduction of facial stress responses such as tea bags, herbal facials, chilled stone rollers, or detoxifying baths and facial steams. The following remedies work as relaxing options for clients in between spa visits.

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Bottom-Line Boosters: Adding Holistic Spa Treatments

Recent COVID-19 restrictions have made staying afloat in the spa industry even more difficult than ever. Therefore, new and inventive treatments are needed to increase revenue. Aside from offering the traditional spa therapies such as massages and facials, consider incorporating one or two holistic healing modalities either as a single treatment or as an upsell to already booked appointments.

Holistic or alternative and natural treatments have gained popularity and acceptance in recent years and are slowly being incorporated along with traditional therapies as clients learn the benefits of these lesser-known options. The following are some of the top holistic treatment options available in alphabetical order.

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Rachelle DupreeRachelle Dupree has over 20 years of experience in marketing, media, communications, and design. She studied with a Denver-based herbalist and naturopath for four years, combining her marketing knowledge with her love of natural remedies and skin care. She currently contracts as a marketing and communications director for Vivoderm Natural Skincare and various design clients. 

 

Is Bakuchiol Better Than Retinol?

In recent years, a new player in the antiaging game has come onto the field and is growing in popularity –bakuchiol. Bakuchiol is a natural chemical compound extracted from the seeds of the bakuchi plant (psoralea corylifolia) and has been used in Ayurveda and traditional Chinese medicine for centuries. It was first introduced for commercial use in topical applications around 2007 and recent research proves it to be a gentler alternative to the harsh vitamin A-derived retinols.

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A variety of products can now be found on the market containing bakuchiol in varying levels of concentrations. For those who want the benefits of both retinol and bakuchiol, there are a few combination treatments available as well.

Creating Signage and Assuring Spa Safety

Who would have believed less than a year ago the world would be transformed so dramatically, and life would become practically unrecognizable? The threat of COVID-19 has now infiltrated every level of most people’s daily lives as they struggle to stay at home, social distance, sanitize, and wear face masks.

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Practices that seemed alien and unthinkable last January have now become common place, as individuals continue to ride this wave of safety to assure their health and those of their loved ones and neighbors.

The spa service industry has been the hardest hit with continued closures and increased sanitation practices that have pushed most businesses outside onto sidewalks and parking lots.

As the closures are slowly lifting, spa owners can finally get back to the business of pampering and treating their clients. 

Projected infection rates are predicted to continue well through the mid-year. Following expert guidelines has never been more important to keep spas safe and clean, as well as welcoming clients back in an inviting manner.

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Occupational Safety and Health Administrationand the World Health Organization are among many entities that offer resources massage therapists and spas can utilize. This includes new OSHA guidelines published in May 2020 to help massage therapists and spas better protect themselves and clients from infection.

SIGNAGE AND BEST PRACTICES

Signs instructing clients how to proceed through the spa facility need not be unsightly or gawdy. Feel free to get creativeMatch signage with spa décor and brochure style, including typefaces and color schemes. Make signs humorous or fun. Don’t forget to update websites and social media accounts with all of this information. Clear communication is key.

ACTION PLAN

Before any client can enter the spa, they must pass an intake procedure confirming they have not been in contact with any person who has COVID-19 or preferably have been tested as well.Place signage at the front entrance explaining all of these new policies and procedures.Many states are still requiring masks for both employees and clients. Consider policies for clients who visit without a mask or are unable to wear a mask. Determine ahead of time if you will provide masks free of charge or as part of a service fee. If a client refuses to wear a mask, most states mandate that the client return only when the mask ban has been lifted.Spas are required to take the temperature of all who enter the facility with a thermal or ear thermometer. Anyone with a temperature above 99.9 degrees Fahrenheit will be asked to stay at home.Most spas are opening at a 25% capacity. If a client needs assistance entering or dressing, their companion also needs to be screened.Once a client has been cleared for treatment, have a designated safe-zone waiting area for them to allow social distancing or ask the client to wait in their own vehicles until their skin care professional is ready. Use text messaging options with personal cell phones to stay in contact if possible.The spa facility itself should have clear boundaries marking the six feet apart measurements, either with floor signage or plexiglass separators.Have clearly marked sanitation stations available, including no-touch hand sanitizer, tissues, gloves, and masks if your spa provides them. Also keep waste bins no-touch or use foot peddle access with lids.

Until strict sanitation protocols are lifted or relaxed, all commonly touched items, like magazines, business cards, brochures, and product samples must be removed. You can offer these sanitized items in clear plastic containers or bags and distribute them to clients upon request. This is also a good opportunity to update all product and services information on the spa’s website or social media.Restrooms and high-touch areas must be cleaned and disinfected after use, and a schedule kept indicating when they were last cleaned. This includes areas such as doorknobs, light switches, counters, chairs, and more. This cleaning schedule can be posted for clients to see.Products and samples should be staff accessible only. Place signage requesting staff to help clients with selecting items. Gloves should be used when touching products and changed between clients and disinfected. Ensure each item a client touches is cleaned or provide disposable individual samples. 

The world we once knew has changed, and we may never get back to the “old normal” but by following the safety guidelines and posting proper signage, the “new normal” will make client’s spa visit a true success.

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rachelle dupree

 

Rachelle Dupree has over 20 years of experience in marketing, media, communications, and design. She studied with a Denver-based herbalist and naturopath for four years, combining her marketing knowledge with her love of natural remedies and skin care. She currently contracts as a marketing and communications director for Vivoderm Natural Skincare and various design clients. 

Excellent Exteriors: The Curb Appeal of the Spa

Curb appeal is the first impression in real estate, and a spa business should also be doubly mindful of this fact. As a spa owner, presenting a clean, accessible, and inviting storefront speaks volumes to what treatments or pampering clients should expect when they walk in the door.

As the number of spas and medical spas increases, it is vital to find a design theme that can not only stand out from the competition but invite new clients in.

Attention should be given to spa interiors and treatment rooms, color pallets, lighting, sound, and furniture. It can be a real detriment to not continue that level of attention to the exterior.

Not every spa can be located on acres of lush woodlands or sandy beaches tucked away in a private retreat. In fact, many of them are right next door in urban locations, such as shopping strip malls and small storefronts. While there may be some limitations to what can be built out or designed in a congregated shopping center, there are still plenty of small ways to make a big impact and draw more people to the spa’s location.

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CLEANLINESS & ACCESSIBILITY 

A successful spa-front should be clean, well-designed, on-trend, and accessible. Consider all aspects of that first-impression, including parking availability, sidewalks or paths, plants or foliage, and overall design. 

One of the more frustrating experiences in urban living is to drive by a new restaurant or business you would love to visit only to discover, they only offer street or two-hour metered parking. Many potential clients will keep on driving or go looking for a better location. If parking is an issue, try to find alternatives nearby. Perhaps the spa can offer valet or rent space from another local business or parking garage. The ability to allow clients to stay longer if they so choose is a big plus.

Once parking is situated, pay attention to the condition of the sidewalks and walkways. Are they cracked and uprooted? Are they a tripping hazard? Are they accessible and navigable by anyone with a handicap? Are they littered with trash or debris? If possible, can a custom-stamped sidewalk or pathway be done? The dollars are in the details. Spending even a little bit more of the budget for a slightly higher end landscape or walkway will make all the difference. 

SIGNAGE & OVERALL DESIGNS 

You probably will spend hours if not weeks deciding on the interior design theme of the spa. Making sure the color pallets were exactly right – soothing and calm or bold and glossy. Whatever the style, don’t forget to carry that theme outdoors. It will tell clients what they can expect when they go inside. If there is space for planters, greenery, or fountains, use every inch to the spa’s advantage. Outdoor patios can become great gathering places for socializing while offering a calm environment sheltered from the noise and traffic with affordable facades, such as screens or noise-cancelling fountains. Outdoor speakers can also be incorporated to bring soothing music outside and create another potential draw for clients looking for a little retreat. Crafting a multi-use space that merges a lounge, retail, or juice and tea area establishes an environment that feels social but still makes money.

Signage is also a big draw or detractor. Does it match the overall theme and color palette of the interior? Is it loud and noisy, with overly bold colors and giant lettering? Does it look more like a relaxing spa or a busy nightclub? Keep signage simple and to a minimum, including informational signs, like specials and pricing. Help draw a potential client in to ask more questions about services. Cleary mark the address, store hours, and contact info on a window or tent sign. Also, don’t forget to post signs indicating if the spa is open or closed.

EVOLVING WITH TRENDS & COMPETITION 

Perhaps the spa is just starting out on a very small budget, and the owner is doing most of the work themself. Maybe they have been in the spa business for years and have a reliable team of experts at their disposal. Whatever the situation, one thing is for sure in a world surrounded by the latest, newest treatments and on-trend styles – spas cannot get lazy and let storefront designs fall years behind competitors. 

To be successful, spas must know the size of the customer bases, the size of the spa, and what the competition is doing. Spas need their own distinction in the marketplace. The brand and design should also reflect the location and the culture or tastes in which the spa resides. Choosing certain materials, woods, plants, and so forth based on the local climate or from local sources is an eco-friendly option and will usually cost less. A spa that looks like a beach resort might not do so well high in the mountains or in a cold climate for instance. Do the research first whenever possible. Once the design is implemented, check in once a year or so to monitor, measure results, and make changes as needed. 

With the right plan, incorporating the same design style inside and outside, and paying attention to the details, a spa is sure to hit the mark and help the professional build a successful spa business.

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rachelle dupree

 

 

Rachelle Dupree has over 20 years of experience in marketing, media, communications, and design. She studied with a Denver-based herbalist and naturopath for four years, combining her marketing knowledge with her love of natural remedies and skincare. She currently contracts as a marketing and communications director for Vivoderm Natural Skincare and various design clients.

Treating Teenage Acne: Acne Cosmedica & Best Makeup Practices

Increased androgens, sebum production, lifestyle, genes, and hygiene practices can all contribute to teenage acne. Yet another possibility could be due to excessive or poor makeup usage. This type of acne is known as acne cosmetica.

 

 

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rachelle dupree

 

 

 

Rachelle Dupree has over 20 years of experience in marketing, media, communications, and design. She studied with a Denver-based herbalist and naturopath for four years, combining her marketing knowledge with her love of natural remedies and skin care. She currently contracts as a marketing and communications director for Vivoderm Natural Skincare and various design clients.